Scooby-Doo Camp Scare Wiki
Advertisement
Swing_Out_Sister_-_10._Who_Let_The_Love_Out_(Medley)_(Live_at_the_Jazz_Cafe)

Swing Out Sister - 10. Who Let The Love Out (Medley) (Live at the Jazz Cafe)

Rugrats and Speed Racer: The Next Generation: Difference between pages From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (Difference between pages) Jump to navigationJump to search Revision as of 21:23, 19 August 2007 (view source) 68.44.92.82 (talk)

Revision as of 12:59, 17 August 2008 (edit) Wikialexdx (talk | contribs)

Line 1: Line 1: − Template:Dablink Template:For

	{{Infobox Television
	

{{Infobox Television − | show_name = Rugrats +

| show_name = Speed Racer: The Next Generation
	+	
| creator = Larry Schwarz
(based on the original series created by Tatsuo Yoshida)

− | image = Rugrats

	+	
| format = Animated sitcom science-fiction

− | caption = The Rugrats intertitle

	+	
| starring = Kurt Csolak
Sahra Mellesse
Carter Jackson
Peter Fernandez
Michael Sinterniklaas
Robbie Sublett
David Zen Mansley

− | format = Children's television series

	+	
| producer = Larry Schwarz
Ken Katsumoto
James Rocknowski
John Rocknowski
Sergei Aniskov
Sean Lahey
Christopher Fauci
Michael Gold
Doug MacLennon

− | runtime = 22 minutes approx

	+	
| writer = Ben Gruber
Allan Neuwirth
Marv Wolfman
Susan Kim
Justin Gray
Jimmy Palmiotti
Aaron Bergeron
Daniel Schofield
Mike Yank

− | creator = Arlene Klasky
Gabor Csupo
Paul Germain

	+	
| director =  Stephen Moverley
John Holt

− | voices = Elizabeth Daily
Christine Cavanaugh
Nancy Cartwright
Kath Soucie
Cheryl Chase
Tara Strong
Cree Summer
Dionne Quan
Melanie Chartoff
Jack Riley
Michael Bell
Tress MacNeille
David Doyle
Joe Alaskey
Philip Proctor
Julia Kato

	+	
| opentheme = "Go Speed Racer Go!", rearranged by John Angier

− | country = Template:Flagcountry

	+	
| endtheme = "Go Speed Racer Go!" (w/o vocals)

− | network = Nickelodeon

	+	
| composer = John Angier

− | first_aired = August 8, 1991

	+	
| country = Template:USA

− | last_aired = June 8, 2004

− | status = +

| num_seasons = 1

− | num_episodes = 172 +

| num_episodes = 12
	+	
| status = Currently Airing

− | imdb_id = 0101188

	+	
| runtime = 23 minutes (approx.)
	+	
| developer = Nickelodeon Studios
	+	
| network = Nickelodeon (2008)
Nicktoons Network (2008-present) + | executive_producer= Larry Schwarz
James Rocknowski
John Rocknowski + | preceded_by = Speed Racer
Speed Racer X + | related = Three Delivery
(2008-present)
Kappa Mikey
(2006-present) + | first_aired = May 2, 2008 + | last_aired = Present + | website = http://www.lionsgate.com/speedracer/ + | imdb_id = 1055136 + | tv_com_id = 75604

}}

}}

	+	

Speed Racer: The Next Generation is an American animated children's television series based on the classic Speed Racer franchise, in which the internal events take place decades after those in the 1967 Japanese series. It is the third television adaptation of the franchise, and is executive produced by Lions Gate Entertainment, Larry Schwarz, and Ken Katsumoto. It is the first Nicktoon not to be based on an original property. Animation Collective produces the series. Lionsgate is marketing this show as a direct continuation of the Japanese 1967 show, but whether or not this is an accurate, canonical succeeder is debatable. − Rugrats is an animated television series that ran on Nickelodeon and it was one of the first three Nicktoons: after Doug and before Ren & Stimpy.

	+	
	+	

This series was partly made to promote the live-action film, and the pilot movie premiered on Nicktoons Network on May 2, a week before the feature film adaptation was released in theatres.[1] However, both projects are produced independently from one another and feature different generations of "Speed Racers" (with the film featuring the original generation), though both feature a Mach 6.

	+	
	

Contents

Premise[]

Premise[]

− The show revolves around four toddlers, Tommy Pickles, Chuckie Finster and the twins Phillip (Phil) and Lillian (Lil) DeVille, who are able to communicate to each other in baby speak (although viewers can understand them, because it is supposedly 'translated'). Often, they mispronounce words or use poor grammar. Despite the toddlers' inability and lack of desire to communicate with adults, they can understand their parents' speaking, although they often misunderstand what they hear, usually by taking metaphors literally and speaking in malapropisms. Angelica Pickles, at age three, is able to communicate and understand language from both the toddlers and the adults, which she often uses as an advantage when she wants to manipulate either party.


	+	

This series takes place either in the present, or in the near future. Prior to the events of the series, the original Speed Racer has disappeared for unknown reasons, but the main characters know that he is alive. Only one of the original characters, Spritle, has a major role in this show. Speed Racer is seen briefly at the end of "The Note". The rest of the original cast are unseen, and their whereabouts are unknown. −

Production[]

− It was the network's second Nicktoon. The series was in production from 1991 to 1994, and again from 1996 to 2004. It aired in Nickelodeon's Snick block from 1997-2000 and it also aired on Nick Jr's block. It is the longest lasting Nicktoon to date at thirteen years of longevity. Rugrats received a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame in a ceremony on June 28, 2001.


	+	

The series follows the adventures of an orphan teenager named Speed who dreams of being a famed car racer like the one he is named after. He takes a bus to the elite Racing Academy, founded by the Racer family, and soon experiences the difficulties of fitting in and competing with X, the best racer/student in the school, and Speed Racer's son. Spritle himself is now the headmaster. − The show airs in the UK on CITV and Nickelodeon UK as well as in Canada on YTV. In Australia, it can be seen on Nickelodeon Australia.


− After the introduction of SpongeBob SquarePants, popularity for Rugrats declined. The Rugrats never had a rival this strong in popularity (many shows were produced during the Rugrats lifetime, but none were as successful as SpongeBob SquarePants). In order to keep its popularity, the studios released several movies and specials, such as the introduction of Dil Pickles and Kimi Finster. Ironically, after these introductions, fans determined that Rugrats jumped the shark.


	+	

In the pilot movie, Speed discovers that he is the other son of Speed Racer, meaning that X is his brother. Through the rest of the series, Speed and his new allies set out on a quest to get through the courses, discover the mystery of Speed Racer's disappearance, and try and build the Mach Six, a car that captures the spirit and gadgets of the Mach 5 for new generations, and the first car to contain a gasless engine. − When Nickelodeon declined to renew any more new episodes of Rugrats and All Grown Up, Klasky-Csupo (the studios responsible for Rugrats) closed down most of its operations. At the time of their cancellation, those series were the only Klasky-Csupo series on the Nickelodeon schedule.


	+	

The most pivotal plot device is the virtual track, a race track that transports racers to virtual racing environments known as the Virtual World. School faculty can have the ability to add their own obstacles and as many obstacles as they wish, complying to school safety regulations. Whenever a racer is defeated in the track, they automatically get dispensed back onto the real one, unharmed. However, like all programs, the virtual track can be infested with viruses and/or hacked, causing anyone trapped in the Virtual World to be affected. −

Characters[]

Main article: List of Rugrats characters


	+	

Main Characters[]

Episodes[]

	+	

Speed Racer Jr.[]

Main article: List of Rugrats episodes
	+	

Voiced by: Kurt Colak

	+	

The main character of the series, Speed Jr. is the second son of the original Speed Racer from the 1967 Japanese anime series. He was hidden from the public by both his father and Trixie, for unknown reasons. Speed grew up in an orphanage for the majority of his childhood. His parents had left him a special key and a red racing bandanna, both of which he kept with him for sentimental reasons. He is often awkward and shy, but being behind the wheel brings out the best in him. Unlike his father, Speed doesn't get into any perilous trouble of fighting thugs and gang members, therefore instead of fighting, Speed uses his racing skill. In the pilot movie, Conor mentions that he made it onto the leader boards, but it is still unclear where he is currently ranked. −

Films[]

Main article: The Rugrats Movie

Main article: Rugrats in Paris: The Movie

Main article: Rugrats Go Wild


	+	

Speed's skills on the racetrack are on par with those of the top ranking students at the Racing Academy. His skills are somewhat inherited, with Speed knowing the right timing, and maneuvers during racing. Despite his amazing talent, he is generally quite modest about his abilities and claims that his maneuvers are a result of instinct rather than skill. He is not in it for money or fame - he just wants to be "the best in the world", and to have fun. He befriends two of the school's students, Conor and Lucy. Together, they work as a team both inside and outside school grounds. −

Spinoffs[]

Main article: All Grown Up

Main article: Angelica and Susie's Pre-School Daze

  • The Carmichaels was a spin-off planned to see Susie move away from California to Atlanta, where she apparently has relatives.


	+	

Casually, Speed wears a blue long sleeve shirt with red stars embroidered on both sleeves. When racing, he dons a white and blue racing helmet with a large, stylized red "M" (which stands for Mifune Motors) atop the visor and a racing jacket that contains several references to the original anime and manga series. The jacket's collar is red, an homage to the red racing ascot tie the original Speed Racer had worn. The jacket's color scheme is mostly blue with white accents, a homage to the color scheme of the original Speed's outfit. Lastly, the jacket features several patches which contain references to the Japanese show, including the names such as "Go" and "Daisuke", the Japanese names of Speed and Pops Racer, respectively. At formal events such as the school dance, he wears a pale light blue shirt and light brown jacket and pants. −

Broadcast history[]

  • USA

    • Nickelodeon (1991-2005) (Original Run), (2006-2007)

    • Nicktoons Network (2002-present) (Reruns)

    • Boomerang


	+	

X Racer[]

  • UK
	+	

Voiced by: Robbie Sublett

    • Children's BBC (Including Live & Kicking) (1993-2004)

    • Nickelodeon (1994-Present)

    • Nicktoons (2002-Present)

    • CITV (2005-present)


	+	

Unknown whether "X" is his real or nickname, he is the oldest son of the original Speed Racer, and the number one racer at the Racing Academy. Known for his skills and abilities on the track, he is slick, handsome, and popular among the girls at school. While X appears to be a tough guy on the outside, he has a more kind-hearted personality than he leads other people to believe. He is initially shocked to find out that Speed is his younger brother, but becomes more accepting of the fact and develops a tough, brotherly bond with him and is always there to give advice. But just because Speed's his brother, doesn't mean X is willing to go easy on him. They are constantly each others' rivals on the track. He usually hangs out with Jared, Jesse, and his girlfriend, Annalise. He wears a gray A-Shirt and has a large "X" tattoo on his right arm. −

  • Australia

    • Nickelodeon (1995-Present)

    • ABC TV

    • ABC2, a digital rerun channel of ABC TV

    • ABC Kids, a short lived digital channel containing the Kids programming from ABC TV

    • Network Ten


	+	

His car's name is the Shooting Star, a homage to X's uncle's (Rex Racer, known as Racer X) racing vehicle. Though the car retains none of the original Shooting Star's original color scheme, the vehicle dons the number 9 on both sides. It is unknown whether the original Speed Racer named him after Racer X, or if the Racing Academy had given the name to him. X had the Shooting Star rigged to activate an ejector chair which could transform into a mini helicopter. −

  • Ireland

    • RTÉ Two

    • Nickelodeon (1994-Present)

    • Nicktoons (2002-Present)

    • CITV (2005-present)

    • Children's BBC (Including Live & Kicking) (1993-2004)


	+	

Spritle Racer[]

  • Canada
	+	

Voiced by: Peter Fernandez

    • Treehouse

    • YTV


	+	

He and Speed Racer are the only members of the original cast from the Japanese series in a major role. Spritle now runs the Academy founded by the Racer Family as the headmaster. While he is Speed and X's uncle and provides fatherly wisdom from time to time, he never bends the school rules for his nephews' sake. He is shown as a matured person in contrast to his childlike attitude in the original series, therefore, Spritle doesn't seem to be suspicious of anybody around him. Spritle remains clueless about Zile Zazic's evil scheme and usually sits behind the scenes during the climax of a given episode. −

  • Malaysia

    • Nickelodeon

    • TV3 (199?-2006)


	+	

Lucy[]

  • Netherlands
	+	

Voiced by: Sahra Mellesse

    • Nickelodeon


	+	

A good friend of Speed and Conor, Lucy is the sensible one of the group. She wears a light blue mechanic’s uniform with the Racing Academy logo on it. Strict, open-minded, and studious, she often assists Conor with his work, but is a little bit bossy at times. While she is generally a friendly and calm individual, Lucy will occasionally insult Conor and bombard Speed with criticism. She always makes up for it by helping her friends. Lucy has formed a crush on Speed, as she has shown jealousy for any other girl who shows Speed affection in “Be Cruel To Your School” and “The Dance”. It is still unknown whether Speed knows these feelings, but since "The Dance", there is a good chance he might. −

See also[]

Template:Portalpar

  • Klasky-Csupo


	+	

Trixie, Speed Sr.'s girlfriend, can be compared to Lucy, because her attitude and role in the series are very similar. Lucy doesn't appear to drive her own car, but in one episode, she pilots a small helicopter transformed from X's ejector seat. −

External links[]

Template:Wikiquote

  • Rugrats at the Big Cartoon DataBase

  • Template:Imdb title

  • Template:Tv.com show


	+	

Conor[]

Template:RugratsNav

	+	

Voiced by: Carter Jackson

	+	

A poor racer, but a great mechanic, Conor is good friends with Speed and Lucy. One of his most defining characteristics is that he is a huge fan of Speed Racer Sr. to the point where his interest borders on obsession. He often cosplays in his Speed Racer outfit, has tons of memorabilia and merchandise in his dorm room, and knows everything there is to know about him and the Mach 5. His nerdish, hyperactive behavior and interests prevent him from making many friends- when Speed accepts him as one, he is eternally grateful and proves to be a reliable companion. Conor clearly has a crush on Annalise, despite of her being completely out of his league, and never having the feeling returned. − Template:Nicktoons


	+	

Chim-Chim[]

	+	

Conor built this robot based on the pet chimpanzee the headmaster used to own, but added countless gadgets and professional engineering skills. He is entirely loyal to Conor, and by extension, Speed and Lucy. Chim-Chim has a seemingly unlimited amount of uses, from transforming into a scooter, to storing anything inside the compartment in his stomach, to repairing the Mach Six while it's moving. However, that doesn't stop him from eating necessary car parts, or creating the usual kind of mischief all monkeys make. His belly has a lining of lead material, encasing the contents within the storage area, and protecting them from radiation, and magnetic deterioration. His control panel is behind the lid on his back. As a pantomime character, like R2-D2, he talks in electronic beeps. In "The Dance", he was modified into a date for Conor named "Chimantha". Conor's rival Ronald built a monkey similar to Chim-Chim, which he named Mich-Mich. − tr:Rugrats

	+	

de:Rugrats

	+	

Annalise Zazic[]

es:Rugrats

	+	

Voiced by: Michal Friedmanfr:Les Razmoket

	+	

he:ראגרטס

	+	

Annalise is X's girlfriend, and the second best racer in the school. A spoiled, selfish, whiny material girl, Annalise gets whatever she wants from her father, Zile Zazic, since they come from a rich family. She immediately dislikes Speed upon meeting him, since he's the new kid who gets picked upon in every school, and calls him "Newb" and "Speed Bump". Her discovery of him being X's brother only heightens her animosity for him, as he could be a possible competition for her own boyfriend, and becomes one of Speed's top enemies. But it seems that she has warmed up to Speed, making her boyfriend, X, jealous whenever she comes to Speed for help. − ms:Rugrats

	+	

nl:Ratjetoe (tekenfilmserie)

	+	

Snake Oiler, Speed Sr's racing rival in the original series can be compared to Annalise. His car number, 12, and attitude are very similar. − pl:Rugrats

	+	

pt:Rugrats

	+	

Zile Zazic[]

ru:Неугомонные детки

	+	

Voiced by: Dave Skigen

	+	
	+	

The academy would be nothing without Zile Zazic- he paid for, designed, and had the Academy's racing track "built for him". He also donated many buildings and additions to the school, and is on great terms with the headmaster and views X as the star student of the school. However, he has a vague, mysterious vendetta against Speed Racer from long ago, and once he discovers "Little Speed Jr." has built the Mach 6 from the Mach 5, he becomes his enemy in secret, carrying out undercover hits on him from his lair. This makes sense, since he is a rich oil tycoon, and the Mach 6's eco-friendly design could ruin him. He now not only wants to destroy the Mach 6, but Speed too.

	+	
	+	

Minor Characters[]

	+	

Speed Racer[]

	+	

Voiced By: Peter Fernandez

	+	
	+	

Speed Racer is the father of Speed and X, which makes him the second known cast member from the 1967 Japanese show to appear here. He first appeared for a brief moment in the episode, "The Note". He states that he is not able to see Speed and X now, but he hopes to see them soon. They currently know that Speed Racer is not dead or missing, but is waiting for the right time to meet them face-to-face, when the time comes.

	+	
	+	

Jared and Jesse[]

	+	

Voiced by: Michael Sinterniklaas

	+	
	+	

Two twins who are part of X's student entourage, Jared and Jesse act as a team, and share the rank as the third best racers in the school. Normally rude and unpleasant, they often act as Annalise's bullish lackies. While they do their best to get the job done, both twins are equally incompetent. On the track, Jared and Jesse are a fearsome team. Although they race together in a single vehicle, the actual car has the ability to split into two pieces which both of them can operate separately for periods of time. They use this technique to surround a single opponent from both sides on the race track.

	+	
	+	

Stan[]

	+	

Voiced by: David "Zen" Mansley

	+	
	+	

Stan is Zile's personal assistant and second-in-command, despite being clumsy and dimwitted most of the time. His large, monstrous size and gentle composure almost makes him look like a jolly giant, often getting in the way of the evil plans he is supposed to carry out. He is overly polite to everyone, and is deeply apologetic whenever he disobeys his boss. However, Stan is still serious about the job, and his mind is always on Zile's side.

	+	
	+	

Armand Aniskov[]

	+	

Voiced by: David "Zen" Mansley

	+	
	+	

Professor Aniskov is an instructor at the Racing Academy who teaches the class on offensive driving techniques. Stern and aloof, he rarely shows any signs of favoritism, and treats all of his students with the same air of indifference. He is probably one of the more critical instructors that the academy has to offer, and is not particularly well-liked by any of his students because of this. His behavior also appears to spread beyond the student body, as he once made a snide remark towards Headmaster Spritle after Speed's first qualifying race. The students often describe him as a mean professor, particularly Conor.

	+	
	+	

Susan Winn[]

	+	

Voiced by: Mami Kimura

	+	
	+	

Susan Winn is an intelligent and level-headed woman who teaches the class on defensive driving techniques at the Racing Academy. She is handicapped, and travels around in a sleek, motorized wheel-chair. Professor Winn is generally much kinder and more accepting of her students than Professor Aniskov, and is respected because of this. While displaying a sense of strict guidelines and acceptable conduct in her classes, she is a very fair individual.

	+	
	+	

Mach Five and Mach Six[]

	+	
	+	

The second episode features the rebuilt Mach 5 designed as it appeared in the original anime, only animated in CGI, like all of the other cars in the show's racing sequences. Minor changes have occurred in the Mach Five in this series. Although the function for the homing robot is present, it is redesigned to resemble more of a metal peacock than a sleek, futuristic robot dove. The Deflector is used as the roof of the Mach Five. Also revealed in this show is an ejector's seat underneath the driver's seat in case of emergencies. A parachute was made, but was forgotten to be installed at the time.

	+	
	+	

Its return is brief, as one of the antagonists destroys it successfully. However, plans for a new car are discovered and soon the protagonists retool the Mach Five to form the Mach 6. The Mach 6's engine is not designed to run on gas, which is a crucial story point, even though gas is still used for it through most of the series. It has all the features of the Mach Five, but redesigned or changed in some form or another. For example, the rotary saws are kept, but they're turned into laser saws. The new car features a transparent, holographic screen over the dashboard that the driver can use to interact live with his crew, and with other racers. Apparently, Speed mentions it can dispense rubber spiders out the back, and also real spiders, but he has not confirmed this.

	+	
	+	

The Mach 6 succeeds the Mach 5 for the rest of the series, and more of the original gadgets will be gradually revealed (such as the sludge slick) and used in future episodes.

	+	
	+	

Episodes[]

	+	

Season 1: 2008-present[]

	+	
	+	
+ # Title Director Writer Original Release Date Production code
	+	

{{Episode list

	+	
EpisodeNumber=1
	+	
Title=The Beginning, Part 1
	+	
WrittenBy= Justin Gray, James Palmiotti
	+	
DirectedBy= Stephen Moverley
	+	
OriginalAirDate=April 27, 2008[2]
	+	
ProdCode=101
	+	
ShortSummary=Speed arrives at the Racing Academy and meets all of the main cast. With no race car of his own, Conor lets him use a junky, spare one for the Qualifying Race. Having destroyed the car, his key, which was left to him by his mysterious father, glows, and leads him to find the Mach Five's hood disassembled from the other pieces of the car.
	+	
LineColor=0000FF
	+	

}}{{Episode list

	+	
EpisodeNumber=2
	+	
Title=The Beginning, Part 2
	+	
WrittenBy= Justin Gray, James Palmiotti
	+	
DirectedBy= Stephen Moverley
	+	
OriginalAirDate=May 2, 2008
	+	
ProdCode=102
	+	
ShortSummary=Speed and his friends rebuild the Mach 5 and test it out. However, Annalise, under Zile's orders, destroys it in a match against X. Spritle reveals a shocking suprise to Speed that he is Speed Racer's son, and is X's long lost Brother.
	+	
LineColor=0000FF
	+	

}}{{Episode list

	+	
EpisodeNumber=3
	+	
Title=The Beginning, Part 3
	+	
WrittenBy= Justin Gray, James Palmiotti
	+	
DirectedBy= Stephen Moverley
	+	
OriginalAirDate=May 2, 2008
	+	
ProdCode=103
	+	
ShortSummary=Speed and his friends discover the secret plans to build the Mach 6 and its unique engine from the remains of the Mach 5. Speed uses the new car to race once again against Annalise, and wins.
	+	
LineColor=0000FF
	+	

}}{{Episode list

	+	
EpisodeNumber=4
	+	
Title=Low Price of Fame
	+	
WrittenBy=Gerry Duggan
	+	
DirectedBy= John Holt
	+	
OriginalAirDate=May 9, 2008
	+	
ProdCode=104
	+	
ShortSummary=Speed takes advice from X on how to deal with the fame of being Speed Racer's son from his classmates. A crazy stalker student named Mitch spreads a rumor that Speed will have a rivalry race with his brother, X, which spirals into a real race. When Annalise sees X not taking this seriously, she stands up and sabotages Speed's car so X can win.
	+	
LineColor=0000FF
	+	

}}{{Episode list

	+	
EpisodeNumber=5
	+	
Title=Be Cruel To Your School
	+	
WrittenBy= Marv Wolfman
	+	
DirectedBy= John Holt
	+	
OriginalAirDate=May 16, 2008
	+	
ProdCode=105
	+	
ShortSummary=Speed and X must work together as a team in order to win a multi-school racing tournament. Meanwhile, Zile plans to ruin Speed and X's teamwork during the tournament to also destroy the Mach 6.
	+	
LineColor=0000FF
	+	

}}{{Episode list

	+	
EpisodeNumber=6
	+	
Title=The Note
	+	
WrittenBy= Aaron Bergeron
	+	
DirectedBy= John Holt
	+	
OriginalAirDate=May 23, 2008
	+	
ProdCode=106
	+	
ShortSummary=Speed gradually receives mysterious notes signed by his father, but he suspects that they could be false. When he receives another letter asking for Speed to come meet him, Speed goes to figure out who the imposter is. Meanwhile, Zile plans to have his birthday party. At the end of the episode, Speed receives what he and X believe is a real note from their father.
	+	
LineColor=0000FF
	+	

}}

	+	

{{Episode list

	+	
EpisodeNumber=7
	+	
Title=The Fast Track, Part 1
	+	
WrittenBy= Ben Gruber
	+	
DirectedBy= John Holt
	+	
OriginalAirDate= June 27, 2008[3]
	+	
ProdCode=107
	+	
ShortSummary=Thanks to Joel the lab technician, Zile takes over the virtual track to mess up Speed's race at the Redwood Rally so he doesn't survive. After Speed suspects whats going on, he decides to investigate, but in the process, Speed, Annalise and the Mach 6 all get sucked into the virtual track.
	+	
LineColor=0000FF
	+	

}}

	+	

{{Episode list

	+	
EpisodeNumber=8
	+	
Title=The Fast Track Part, 2
	+	
WrittenBy= Ben Gruber
	+	
DirectedBy= John Holt
	+	
OriginalAirDate= July 4, 2008[4]
	+	
ProdCode=108
	+	
ShortSummary=While Speed and Annalise are still stuck in the virtual track, they must put their differences aside to survive. Meanwhile, Conor, Lucy, and X must find a way to get them out before the track eats itself up due to the virus, or they'll be stuck there forever. Two vehicles from the original show- the Mammoth Car (from episodes 7 and 8) and the X3- make cameos in this episode.
	+	
LineColor=0000FF
	+	

}}

	+	

{{Episode list

	+	
EpisodeNumber=9
	+	
Title=The Fast Track, Part 3
	+	
WrittenBy= Ben Gruber
	+	
DirectedBy= John Holt
	+	
OriginalAirDate= July 11, 2008[5]
	+	
ProdCode=109
	+	
ShortSummary= Speed and Annalise make it out of the track. Delighted, Zile finds out Joel installed the virus, and decides to promote him to make the track more deadly for Speed and the Mach 6. One thing Zile is not aware of is that the Mammoth Car, the X3, and Jungle Conor invade the real world to wreck more havoc.
	+	
LineColor=0000FF
	+	

}}

	+	

{{Episode list

	+	
EpisodeNumber=10
	+	
Title= Honor Code
	+	
WrittenBy= Rob Klein
	+	
DirectedBy= John Holt
	+	
OriginalAirDate= July 25, 2008
	+	
ProdCode=110
	+	
ShortSummary= Speed is faced with expulsion when it appears he cheated in a race. Knowing that he was framed, Speed sets out to find the real culprit. Meanwhile, Chim-Chim has mysterious glitches.
	+	
LineColor=0000FF
	+	

}}

	+	

{{Episode list

	+	
EpisodeNumber=11
	+	
Title= The Dance
	+	
WrittenBy= Mike Yank
	+	
DirectedBy= John Holt
	+	
OriginalAirDate= August 1, 2008
	+	
ProdCode=111
	+	
ShortSummary= Annalise’s cousin, Elsa, arrives at the campus as an exchange student, in order to seduce Speed into giving out information about the Mach 6… just in time for the school dance. Lucy is suspicious of the girl's motives in wanting to date Speed. Meanwhile, with no date of his own, Conor takes drastic measures.
	+	
LineColor=0000FF
	+	

}}

	+	

{{Episode list

	+	
EpisodeNumber=12
	+	
Title= Top Car
	+	
WrittenBy= Daniel Schofield
	+	
DirectedBy= John Holt
	+	
OriginalAirDate= August 8, 2008
	+	
ProdCode=112
	+	
ShortSummary= Ronald Multon, an esteemed car designing prodigy and old rival of Conor’s, comes to the school as a guest lecturer. Furious that Ronald is in fact a complete hack, and stole all of his ideas, Conor challenges him to a design face-off, where they both bet each of their cars.
	+	
LineColor=0000FF
	+	

}}

	+	
	+	
	+	

DVD Releases[]

	+	

Season 1[]

	+	

The first DVD of the new series was released on May 6, 2008 by Lionsgate. It contains the first movie of the new series. The DVD was released on May 6, 2008 in NTSC ares. The PAL release date is unknown so far.

	+	

	+	
	+	
Volume Name
	+	
Release Date
	+	
Contains
	+	
+ Speed Racer: The Next Generation: The Beginning[6]
	+	
NTSC: May 6, 2008[6]
	+	

PAL: TBA

	+	
	+	

"The Beginning, Part 1"
"The Beginning, Part 2"
"The Beginning, Part 3"

	+	

Interactive Racing Game
Creating the Next Speed Racer Featurette
Bloopers and Stills[7]

	+	
+
	+	
	+	

References[]

	+	
	+	
	+	

External links[]

	+	
	+	
  • Template:Imdb title
	+	
	+	
	+	
	+	
	+	

Template:Nicktoons

	+	

Template:Speed Racer

	+	
	+	
	+	
	+	
	+	
	+	

Revision as of 12:59, 17 August 2008 Speed Racer: The Next Generation Created by Larry Schwarz (based on the original series created by Tatsuo Yoshida) Developed by Nickelodeon Studios Written by Ben Gruber Allan Neuwirth Marv Wolfman Susan Kim Justin Gray Jimmy Palmiotti Aaron Bergeron Daniel Schofield Mike Yank Directed by Stephen Moverley John Holt Starring Kurt Csolak Sahra Mellesse Carter Jackson Peter Fernandez Michael Sinterniklaas Robbie Sublett David Zen Mansley Opening theme "Go Speed Racer Go!", rearranged by John Angier Ending theme "Go Speed Racer Go!" (w/o vocals) Composer John Angier Country of origin United States No. of seasons 1 No. of episodes 12 Production Executive producers Larry Schwarz James Rocknowski John Rocknowski Producers Larry Schwarz Ken Katsumoto James Rocknowski John Rocknowski Sergei Aniskov Sean Lahey Christopher Fauci Michael Gold Doug MacLennon Running time 23 minutes (approx.) Release Original network Nickelodeon (2008) Nicktoons Network (2008-present) Original release May 2, 2008 – Present Chronology Preceded by Speed Racer Speed Racer X Related shows Three Delivery (2008-present) Kappa Mikey (2006-present) External links Website Speed Racer: The Next Generation is an American animated children's television series based on the classic Speed Racer franchise, in which the internal events take place decades after those in the 1967 Japanese series. It is the third television adaptation of the franchise, and is executive produced by Lions Gate Entertainment, Larry Schwarz, and Ken Katsumoto. It is the first Nicktoon not to be based on an original property. Animation Collective produces the series. Lionsgate is marketing this show as a direct continuation of the Japanese 1967 show, but whether or not this is an accurate, canonical succeeder is debatable.

This series was partly made to promote the live-action film, and the pilot movie premiered on Nicktoons Network on May 2, a week before the feature film adaptation was released in theatres.[1] However, both projects are produced independently from one another and feature different generations of "Speed Racers" (with the film featuring the original generation), though both feature a Mach 6.


Contents 1 Premise 2 Main Characters 2.1 Speed Racer Jr. 2.2 X Racer 2.3 Spritle Racer 2.4 Lucy 2.5 Conor 2.6 Chim-Chim 2.7 Annalise Zazic 2.8 Zile Zazic 3 Minor Characters 3.1 Speed Racer 3.2 Jared and Jesse 3.3 Stan 3.4 Armand Aniskov 3.5 Susan Winn 4 Mach Five and Mach Six 5 Episodes 5.1 Season 1: 2008-present 6 DVD Releases 6.1 Season 1 7 References 8 External links Premise This series takes place either in the present, or in the near future. Prior to the events of the series, the original Speed Racer has disappeared for unknown reasons, but the main characters know that he is alive. Only one of the original characters, Spritle, has a major role in this show. Speed Racer is seen briefly at the end of "The Note". The rest of the original cast are unseen, and their whereabouts are unknown.

The series follows the adventures of an orphan teenager named Speed who dreams of being a famed car racer like the one he is named after. He takes a bus to the elite Racing Academy, founded by the Racer family, and soon experiences the difficulties of fitting in and competing with X, the best racer/student in the school, and Speed Racer's son. Spritle himself is now the headmaster.

In the pilot movie, Speed discovers that he is the other son of Speed Racer, meaning that X is his brother. Through the rest of the series, Speed and his new allies set out on a quest to get through the courses, discover the mystery of Speed Racer's disappearance, and try and build the Mach Six, a car that captures the spirit and gadgets of the Mach 5 for new generations, and the first car to contain a gasless engine.

The most pivotal plot device is the virtual track, a race track that transports racers to virtual racing environments known as the Virtual World. School faculty can have the ability to add their own obstacles and as many obstacles as they wish, complying to school safety regulations. Whenever a racer is defeated in the track, they automatically get dispensed back onto the real one, unharmed. However, like all programs, the virtual track can be infested with viruses and/or hacked, causing anyone trapped in the Virtual World to be affected.

Main Characters Speed Racer Jr. Voiced by: Kurt Colak

The main character of the series, Speed Jr. is the second son of the original Speed Racer from the 1967 Japanese anime series. He was hidden from the public by both his father and Trixie, for unknown reasons. Speed grew up in an orphanage for the majority of his childhood. His parents had left him a special key and a red racing bandanna, both of which he kept with him for sentimental reasons. He is often awkward and shy, but being behind the wheel brings out the best in him. Unlike his father, Speed doesn't get into any perilous trouble of fighting thugs and gang members, therefore instead of fighting, Speed uses his racing skill. In the pilot movie, Conor mentions that he made it onto the leader boards, but it is still unclear where he is currently ranked.

Speed's skills on the racetrack are on par with those of the top ranking students at the Racing Academy. His skills are somewhat inherited, with Speed knowing the right timing, and maneuvers during racing. Despite his amazing talent, he is generally quite modest about his abilities and claims that his maneuvers are a result of instinct rather than skill. He is not in it for money or fame - he just wants to be "the best in the world", and to have fun. He befriends two of the school's students, Conor and Lucy. Together, they work as a team both inside and outside school grounds.

Casually, Speed wears a blue long sleeve shirt with red stars embroidered on both sleeves. When racing, he dons a white and blue racing helmet with a large, stylized red "M" (which stands for Mifune Motors) atop the visor and a racing jacket that contains several references to the original anime and manga series. The jacket's collar is red, an homage to the red racing ascot tie the original Speed Racer had worn. The jacket's color scheme is mostly blue with white accents, a homage to the color scheme of the original Speed's outfit. Lastly, the jacket features several patches which contain references to the Japanese show, including the names such as "Go" and "Daisuke", the Japanese names of Speed and Pops Racer, respectively. At formal events such as the school dance, he wears a pale light blue shirt and light brown jacket and pants.

X Racer Voiced by: Robbie Sublett

Unknown whether "X" is his real or nickname, he is the oldest son of the original Speed Racer, and the number one racer at the Racing Academy. Known for his skills and abilities on the track, he is slick, handsome, and popular among the girls at school. While X appears to be a tough guy on the outside, he has a more kind-hearted personality than he leads other people to believe. He is initially shocked to find out that Speed is his younger brother, but becomes more accepting of the fact and develops a tough, brotherly bond with him and is always there to give advice. But just because Speed's his brother, doesn't mean X is willing to go easy on him. They are constantly each others' rivals on the track. He usually hangs out with Jared, Jesse, and his girlfriend, Annalise. He wears a gray A-Shirt and has a large "X" tattoo on his right arm.

His car's name is the Shooting Star, a homage to X's uncle's (Rex Racer, known as Racer X) racing vehicle. Though the car retains none of the original Shooting Star's original color scheme, the vehicle dons the number 9 on both sides. It is unknown whether the original Speed Racer named him after Racer X, or if the Racing Academy had given the name to him. X had the Shooting Star rigged to activate an ejector chair which could transform into a mini helicopter.

Spritle Racer Voiced by: Peter Fernandez

He and Speed Racer are the only members of the original cast from the Japanese series in a major role. Spritle now runs the Academy founded by the Racer Family as the headmaster. While he is Speed and X's uncle and provides fatherly wisdom from time to time, he never bends the school rules for his nephews' sake. He is shown as a matured person in contrast to his childlike attitude in the original series, therefore, Spritle doesn't seem to be suspicious of anybody around him. Spritle remains clueless about Zile Zazic's evil scheme and usually sits behind the scenes during the climax of a given episode.

Lucy Voiced by: Sahra Mellesse

A good friend of Speed and Conor, Lucy is the sensible one of the group. She wears a light blue mechanic’s uniform with the Racing Academy logo on it. Strict, open-minded, and studious, she often assists Conor with his work, but is a little bit bossy at times. While she is generally a friendly and calm individual, Lucy will occasionally insult Conor and bombard Speed with criticism. She always makes up for it by helping her friends. Lucy has formed a crush on Speed, as she has shown jealousy for any other girl who shows Speed affection in “Be Cruel To Your School” and “The Dance”. It is still unknown whether Speed knows these feelings, but since "The Dance", there is a good chance he might.

Trixie, Speed Sr.'s girlfriend, can be compared to Lucy, because her attitude and role in the series are very similar. Lucy doesn't appear to drive her own car, but in one episode, she pilots a small helicopter transformed from X's ejector seat.

Conor Voiced by: Carter Jackson

A poor racer, but a great mechanic, Conor is good friends with Speed and Lucy. One of his most defining characteristics is that he is a huge fan of Speed Racer Sr. to the point where his interest borders on obsession. He often cosplays in his Speed Racer outfit, has tons of memorabilia and merchandise in his dorm room, and knows everything there is to know about him and the Mach 5. His nerdish, hyperactive behavior and interests prevent him from making many friends- when Speed accepts him as one, he is eternally grateful and proves to be a reliable companion. Conor clearly has a crush on Annalise, despite of her being completely out of his league, and never having the feeling returned.

Chim-Chim Conor built this robot based on the pet chimpanzee the headmaster used to own, but added countless gadgets and professional engineering skills. He is entirely loyal to Conor, and by extension, Speed and Lucy. Chim-Chim has a seemingly unlimited amount of uses, from transforming into a scooter, to storing anything inside the compartment in his stomach, to repairing the Mach Six while it's moving. However, that doesn't stop him from eating necessary car parts, or creating the usual kind of mischief all monkeys make. His belly has a lining of lead material, encasing the contents within the storage area, and protecting them from radiation, and magnetic deterioration. His control panel is behind the lid on his back. As a pantomime character, like R2-D2, he talks in electronic beeps. In "The Dance", he was modified into a date for Conor named "Chimantha". Conor's rival Ronald built a monkey similar to Chim-Chim, which he named Mich-Mich.

Annalise Zazic Voiced by: Michal Friedman

Annalise is X's girlfriend, and the second best racer in the school. A spoiled, selfish, whiny material girl, Annalise gets whatever she wants from her father, Zile Zazic, since they come from a rich family. She immediately dislikes Speed upon meeting him, since he's the new kid who gets picked upon in every school, and calls him "Newb" and "Speed Bump". Her discovery of him being X's brother only heightens her animosity for him, as he could be a possible competition for her own boyfriend, and becomes one of Speed's top enemies. But it seems that she has warmed up to Speed, making her boyfriend, X, jealous whenever she comes to Speed for help.

Snake Oiler, Speed Sr's racing rival in the original series can be compared to Annalise. His car number, 12, and attitude are very similar.

Zile Zazic Voiced by: Dave Skigen

The academy would be nothing without Zile Zazic- he paid for, designed, and had the Academy's racing track "built for him". He also donated many buildings and additions to the school, and is on great terms with the headmaster and views X as the star student of the school. However, he has a vague, mysterious vendetta against Speed Racer from long ago, and once he discovers "Little Speed Jr." has built the Mach 6 from the Mach 5, he becomes his enemy in secret, carrying out undercover hits on him from his lair. This makes sense, since he is a rich oil tycoon, and the Mach 6's eco-friendly design could ruin him. He now not only wants to destroy the Mach 6, but Speed too.

Minor Characters Speed Racer Voiced By: Peter Fernandez

Speed Racer is the father of Speed and X, which makes him the second known cast member from the 1967 Japanese show to appear here. He first appeared for a brief moment in the episode, "The Note". He states that he is not able to see Speed and X now, but he hopes to see them soon. They currently know that Speed Racer is not dead or missing, but is waiting for the right time to meet them face-to-face, when the time comes.

Jared and Jesse Voiced by: Michael Sinterniklaas

Two twins who are part of X's student entourage, Jared and Jesse act as a team, and share the rank as the third best racers in the school. Normally rude and unpleasant, they often act as Annalise's bullish lackies. While they do their best to get the job done, both twins are equally incompetent. On the track, Jared and Jesse are a fearsome team. Although they race together in a single vehicle, the actual car has the ability to split into two pieces which both of them can operate separately for periods of time. They use this technique to surround a single opponent from both sides on the race track.

Stan Voiced by: David "Zen" Mansley

Stan is Zile's personal assistant and second-in-command, despite being clumsy and dimwitted most of the time. His large, monstrous size and gentle composure almost makes him look like a jolly giant, often getting in the way of the evil plans he is supposed to carry out. He is overly polite to everyone, and is deeply apologetic whenever he disobeys his boss. However, Stan is still serious about the job, and his mind is always on Zile's side.

Armand Aniskov Voiced by: David "Zen" Mansley

Professor Aniskov is an instructor at the Racing Academy who teaches the class on offensive driving techniques. Stern and aloof, he rarely shows any signs of favoritism, and treats all of his students with the same air of indifference. He is probably one of the more critical instructors that the academy has to offer, and is not particularly well-liked by any of his students because of this. His behavior also appears to spread beyond the student body, as he once made a snide remark towards Headmaster Spritle after Speed's first qualifying race. The students often describe him as a mean professor, particularly Conor.

Susan Winn Voiced by: Mami Kimura

Susan Winn is an intelligent and level-headed woman who teaches the class on defensive driving techniques at the Racing Academy. She is handicapped, and travels around in a sleek, motorized wheel-chair. Professor Winn is generally much kinder and more accepting of her students than Professor Aniskov, and is respected because of this. While displaying a sense of strict guidelines and acceptable conduct in her classes, she is a very fair individual.

Mach Five and Mach Six The second episode features the rebuilt Mach 5 designed as it appeared in the original anime, only animated in CGI, like all of the other cars in the show's racing sequences. Minor changes have occurred in the Mach Five in this series. Although the function for the homing robot is present, it is redesigned to resemble more of a metal peacock than a sleek, futuristic robot dove. The Deflector is used as the roof of the Mach Five. Also revealed in this show is an ejector's seat underneath the driver's seat in case of emergencies. A parachute was made, but was forgotten to be installed at the time.

Its return is brief, as one of the antagonists destroys it successfully. However, plans for a new car are discovered and soon the protagonists retool the Mach Five to form the Mach 6. The Mach 6's engine is not designed to run on gas, which is a crucial story point, even though gas is still used for it through most of the series. It has all the features of the Mach Five, but redesigned or changed in some form or another. For example, the rotary saws are kept, but they're turned into laser saws. The new car features a transparent, holographic screen over the dashboard that the driver can use to interact live with his crew, and with other racers. Apparently, Speed mentions it can dispense rubber spiders out the back, and also real spiders, but he has not confirmed this.

The Mach 6 succeeds the Mach 5 for the rest of the series, and more of the original gadgets will be gradually revealed (such as the sludge slick) and used in future episodes.

Episodes Season 1: 2008-present

  1. Title Director Writer Original Release Date Production code

1 "The Beginning, Part 1" Stephen Moverley Justin Gray, James Palmiotti April 27, 2008[2] 101 Speed arrives at the Racing Academy and meets all of the main cast. With no race car of his own, Conor lets him use a junky, spare one for the Qualifying Race. Having destroyed the car, his key, which was left to him by his mysterious father, glows, and leads him to find the Mach Five's hood disassembled from the other pieces of the car. 2 "The Beginning, Part 2" Stephen Moverley Justin Gray, James Palmiotti May 2, 2008 102 Speed and his friends rebuild the Mach 5 and test it out. However, Annalise, under Zile's orders, destroys it in a match against X. Spritle reveals a shocking suprise to Speed that he is Speed Racer's son, and is X's long lost Brother. 3 "The Beginning, Part 3" Stephen Moverley Justin Gray, James Palmiotti May 2, 2008 103 Speed and his friends discover the secret plans to build the Mach 6 and its unique engine from the remains of the Mach 5. Speed uses the new car to race once again against Annalise, and wins. 4 "Low Price of Fame" John Holt Gerry Duggan May 9, 2008 104 Speed takes advice from X on how to deal with the fame of being Speed Racer's son from his classmates. A crazy stalker student named Mitch spreads a rumor that Speed will have a rivalry race with his brother, X, which spirals into a real race. When Annalise sees X not taking this seriously, she stands up and sabotages Speed's car so X can win. 5 "Be Cruel To Your School" John Holt Marv Wolfman May 16, 2008 105 Speed and X must work together as a team in order to win a multi-school racing tournament. Meanwhile, Zile plans to ruin Speed and X's teamwork during the tournament to also destroy the Mach 6. 6 "The Note" John Holt Aaron Bergeron May 23, 2008 106 Speed gradually receives mysterious notes signed by his father, but he suspects that they could be false. When he receives another letter asking for Speed to come meet him, Speed goes to figure out who the imposter is. Meanwhile, Zile plans to have his birthday party. At the end of the episode, Speed receives what he and X believe is a real note from their father. 7 "The Fast Track, Part 1" John Holt Ben Gruber June 27, 2008[3] 107 Thanks to Joel the lab technician, Zile takes over the virtual track to mess up Speed's race at the Redwood Rally so he doesn't survive. After Speed suspects whats going on, he decides to investigate, but in the process, Speed, Annalise and the Mach 6 all get sucked into the virtual track. 8 "The Fast Track Part, 2" John Holt Ben Gruber July 4, 2008[4] 108 While Speed and Annalise are still stuck in the virtual track, they must put their differences aside to survive. Meanwhile, Conor, Lucy, and X must find a way to get them out before the track eats itself up due to the virus, or they'll be stuck there forever. Two vehicles from the original show- the Mammoth Car (from episodes 7 and 8) and the X3- make cameos in this episode. 9 "The Fast Track, Part 3" John Holt Ben Gruber July 11, 2008[5] 109 Speed and Annalise make it out of the track. Delighted, Zile finds out Joel installed the virus, and decides to promote him to make the track more deadly for Speed and the Mach 6. One thing Zile is not aware of is that the Mammoth Car, the X3, and Jungle Conor invade the real world to wreck more havoc. 10 "Honor Code" John Holt Rob Klein July 25, 2008 110 Speed is faced with expulsion when it appears he cheated in a race. Knowing that he was framed, Speed sets out to find the real culprit. Meanwhile, Chim-Chim has mysterious glitches. 11 "The Dance" John Holt Mike Yank August 1, 2008 111 Annalise’s cousin, Elsa, arrives at the campus as an exchange student, in order to seduce Speed into giving out information about the Mach 6… just in time for the school dance. Lucy is suspicious of the girl's motives in wanting to date Speed. Meanwhile, with no date of his own, Conor takes drastic measures. 12 "Top Car" John Holt Daniel Schofield August 8, 2008 112 Ronald Multon, an esteemed car designing prodigy and old rival of Conor’s, comes to the school as a guest lecturer. Furious that Ronald is in fact a complete hack, and stole all of his ideas, Conor challenges him to a design face-off, where they both bet each of their cars. DVD Releases Season 1 The first DVD of the new series was released on May 6, 2008 by Lionsgate. It contains the first movie of the new series. The DVD was released on May 6, 2008 in NTSC ares. The PAL release date is unknown so far.

Volume Name Release Date Contains Speed Racer: The Next Generation: The Beginning[6] NTSC: May 6, 2008[6] PAL: TBA

"The Beginning, Part 1" "The Beginning, Part 2" "The Beginning, Part 3" Interactive Racing Game Creating the Next Speed Racer Featurette Bloopers and Stills[7]

References

AWN Headline News
Nickelodeon aired P1 to show a sneek peak of the new series.
http://www.tvguide.com/detail/tv-show.aspx?tvobjectid=293428&more=ucepisodelist&episodeid=8012157 Speed Racer: TNG s1 ep7
Speed Racer: The Next Generation Episodes | TVGuide.com
Speed Racer: The Next Generation Episodes | TVGuide.com
"New Speed Racer Movie released on May 6th, 2008". Lionsgate. Retrieved 2008-05-24.
http://www.lionsgateshop.com/product.asp?Id=11137&TitleParentId=4996&View=SpecialFeatures Special Features from the DVD

External links Official Speed Racer site Speed Racer: The Next Generation on IMDb Speed Racer Deals Cross Finish Line NYCC 08: Speed Racer's Next Generation Revealed TV Guide's Speed Racer: The Next Generation episodes Template:Nicktoons

vte Speed Racer by Tatsuo Yoshida Franchise MangaAnimeThe New AdventuresXThe Next Generation episodescharactersFilm soundtrackRace to the Future Video games The Challenge of Racer XMy Most Dangerous AdventuresSpeed Racer (1995)Speed Racer (1996)Speed Racer (2008) Miscellaneous Mach FiveRacer XLego Speed Racer Categories: Speed RacerAnimated television seriesAnime-influenced animation2008 television series debutsTelevision series by Lionsgate Television Navigation menu Not logged in Talk Contributions Create account Log in ArticleTalk ReadView sourceView historySearch Search Wikipedia Main page Contents Current events Random article About Wikipedia Contact us Donate Contribute Help Learn to edit Community portal Recent changes Upload file Tools What links here Related changes Special pages Permanent link Page information Cite this page Wikidata item Print/export Download as PDF Printable version

Languages Español עברית Magyar Português Русский ไทย Edit links This page was last edited on 17 August 2008, at 12:59 (UTC). This version of the page has been revised. Besides normal editing, the reason for revision may have been that this version contains factual inaccuracies, vandalism, or material not compatible with the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License. Privacy policyAbout WikipediaDisclaimersContact WikipediaMobile viewDevelopersStatisticsCookie statementEnable previews Wikimedia FoundationPowered by MediaWiki Rugrats and Speed Racer: The Next Generation: Difference between pages From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (Difference between pages) Jump to navigationJump to search Revision as of 10:23, 19 August 2008 (view source) Hmr (talk | contribs) (→‎Broadcast history)

Revision as of 12:59, 17 August 2008 (edit) Wikialexdx (talk | contribs)

Line 1: Line 1:

	+	

{{Infobox Television − Template:Unreferenced

	+	
| show_name = Speed Racer: The Next Generation

Template:For Template:For

	+	
| creator = Larry Schwarz
(based on the original series created by Tatsuo Yoshida)

− {{infobox Television

	+	
| format = Animated sitcom science-fiction

 | show_name     = Rugrats

	+	
| starring = Kurt Csolak
Sahra Mellesse
Carter Jackson
Peter Fernandez
Michael Sinterniklaas
Robbie Sublett
David Zen Mansley

 | image = 256px

	+	
| producer = Larry Schwarz
Ken Katsumoto
James Rocknowski
John Rocknowski
Sergei Aniskov
Sean Lahey
Christopher Fauci
Michael Gold
Doug MacLennon

 | caption = "Rugrats" Title Card

	+	
| writer = Ben Gruber
Allan Neuwirth
Marv Wolfman
Susan Kim
Justin Gray
Jimmy Palmiotti
Aaron Bergeron
Daniel Schofield
Mike Yank

 | format        = Children's television series

	+	
| director =  Stephen Moverley
John Holt

 | runtime       = 22 minutes approx

	+	
| opentheme = "Go Speed Racer Go!", rearranged by John Angier

 | creator       = Arlene Klasky
Gabor Csupo
Paul Germain
+ | endtheme = "Go Speed Racer Go!" (w/o vocals)

 | starring      = E.G. Daily 
Christine Cavanaugh
Kath Soucie
Cheryl Chase
Tara Strong
Cree Summer
Dionne Quan
Melanie Chartoff
Jack Riley
Michael Bell
Tress MacNeille
David Doyle
Philip Proctor
Joe Alaskey
Julia Kato + | composer = John Angier

 | country       = Template:Flagcountry 

	+	
| country = Template:USA

 | network       = Nickelodeon

	+	
| num_seasons = 1

 | first_aired   = August 11, 1991

	+	
| num_episodes = 12

 | last_aired    = May 29, 1994, & December 6, 1996 - June 8, 2004

 | status        = 

+

| status = Currently Airing
	+	
| runtime = 23 minutes (approx.)

 | num_seasons   = 12

	+	
| developer = Nickelodeon Studios

 | num_episodes  = 172

	+	
| network = Nickelodeon (2008)
Nicktoons Network (2008-present)

 | list_episodes = List of Rugrats episodes

	+	
| executive_producer= Larry Schwarz
James Rocknowski
John Rocknowski

 | followed_by   = All Grown Up!
(2003-2008) + | preceded_by = Speed Racer
Speed Racer X

 | imdb_id = 

	+	
| related = Three Delivery
(2008-present)
Kappa Mikey
(2006-present)

− }}

	+	
| first_aired = May 2, 2008 

− {{Infobox TV ratings

− | show_name = Rugrats +

| last_aired = Present
	+	
| website = http://www.lionsgate.com/speedracer/

− | usa_tv = TV-Y
E/I (CBS only)

− | uk_tv = Uc +

| imdb_id = 1055136

− | can_tv = C +

| tv_com_id = 75604

− | jp_tv =

− | dt_tv =

− | aus_tv = G

− | ms_tv = U

− | nz_tv =


}}

}}

	+	

Speed Racer: The Next Generation is an American animated children's television series based on the classic Speed Racer franchise, in which the internal events take place decades after those in the 1967 Japanese series. It is the third television adaptation of the franchise, and is executive produced by Lions Gate Entertainment, Larry Schwarz, and Ken Katsumoto. It is the first Nicktoon not to be based on an original property. Animation Collective produces the series. Lionsgate is marketing this show as a direct continuation of the Japanese 1967 show, but whether or not this is an accurate, canonical succeeder is debatable.

	+	

This series was partly made to promote the live-action film, and the pilot movie premiered on Nicktoons Network on May 2, a week before the feature film adaptation was released in theatres.[1] However, both projects are produced independently from one another and feature different generations of "Speed Racers" (with the film featuring the original generation), though both feature a Mach 6. − Rugrats is a Daytime Emmy award winning American animated television series that aired from August 11, 1991 to June 8, 2004 on Nickelodeon. At 14 years, Rugrats is Nickelodeon's longest running show. According to Nickelodeon producers, Rugrats is the show that put them on top in the 90's. [2]


Premise[]

+

Premise[]

− The show originally revolved around a group of toddlers, Thomas (Tommy) Pickles, Charles (Chuckie) Finster, and the twins Phillip (Phil) and Lillian (Lil) DeVille. The toddlers are able to communicate with each other through baby speak, although viewers can understand them, because it is 'translated'. Often, they mispronounce words or use poor grammar and their speaking is full of malapropisms. The group is often reluctantly joined by Tommy's cousin, Angelica Pickles. At age three years old, Angelica is able to communicate and understand language from both the toddlers and the adults, which she often uses as an advantage when she wants to manipulate either party. Susie Carmichael, who lives across the street from the Pickles, is also able to communicate on the same level as Angelica, though she isn't manipulative. As a result, Angelica and Susie often clash.[2]


	+	

This series takes place either in the present, or in the near future. Prior to the events of the series, the original Speed Racer has disappeared for unknown reasons, but the main characters know that he is alive. Only one of the original characters, Spritle, has a major role in this show. Speed Racer is seen briefly at the end of "The Note". The rest of the original cast are unseen, and their whereabouts are unknown. − In 1998, a new character was introduced. After The Rugrats Movie, in which Tommy's baby brother Dylan (Dil) Pickles is born, he is soon added as a character on the show. As a three month old baby, Dil is not able to communicate with anyone. Later, after Rugrats in Paris: The Movie is released, Kimi Finster is added as a character as Chuckie's step sister.[2]


	+	

The series follows the adventures of an orphan teenager named Speed who dreams of being a famed car racer like the one he is named after. He takes a bus to the elite Racing Academy, founded by the Racer family, and soon experiences the difficulties of fitting in and competing with X, the best racer/student in the school, and Speed Racer's son. Spritle himself is now the headmaster. −

Characters[]

Main article: List of Rugrats characters


	+	

In the pilot movie, Speed discovers that he is the other son of Speed Racer, meaning that X is his brother. Through the rest of the series, Speed and his new allies set out on a quest to get through the courses, discover the mystery of Speed Racer's disappearance, and try and build the Mach Six, a car that captures the spirit and gadgets of the Mach 5 for new generations, and the first car to contain a gasless engine. −

Production[]

− Rugrats was Nickelodeon's second Nicktoon. The series was in production from 1991 to 1994, and again from 1996 to 2004. It aired in Nickelodeon's Snick block from 1997-2000. It is the longest lasting Nicktoon to date, at over fourteen years longevity. The Rugrats received a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame in a ceremony on June 28, 2001.


	+	

The most pivotal plot device is the virtual track, a race track that transports racers to virtual racing environments known as the Virtual World. School faculty can have the ability to add their own obstacles and as many obstacles as they wish, complying to school safety regulations. Whenever a racer is defeated in the track, they automatically get dispensed back onto the real one, unharmed. However, like all programs, the virtual track can be infested with viruses and/or hacked, causing anyone trapped in the Virtual World to be affected. − The show airs in the UK on CITV and Nickelodeon UK as well as in Canada on YTV. In Australia, it can be seen on Nickelodeon Australia (and, for a period, ABC Television).


	+	

Main Characters[]

− On August 11, 2001, Rugrats celebrated its 10 year anniversary. The special "Rugrats: All Growed Up" was produced for the occasion. After the show, a special retrospective lookback aired, called "Rugrats: Still Babies After All These Years". It was narrated by Amanda Bynes.

	+	

Speed Racer Jr.[]

	+	

Voiced by: Kurt Colak

	+	

The main character of the series, Speed Jr. is the second son of the original Speed Racer from the 1967 Japanese anime series. He was hidden from the public by both his father and Trixie, for unknown reasons. Speed grew up in an orphanage for the majority of his childhood. His parents had left him a special key and a red racing bandanna, both of which he kept with him for sentimental reasons. He is often awkward and shy, but being behind the wheel brings out the best in him. Unlike his father, Speed doesn't get into any perilous trouble of fighting thugs and gang members, therefore instead of fighting, Speed uses his racing skill. In the pilot movie, Conor mentions that he made it onto the leader boards, but it is still unclear where he is currently ranked. −

Movies[]

− In 1998, the first Rugrats film was released, entitled "The Rugrats Movie", which introduced baby Dil, Tommy's little brother, onto the show. In 2000 the second movie, "Rugrats in Paris", was released, with two new characters introduced, Kimi and Kira. Kimi would become Chuckie's sister and Kira would become his new mother, after marrying his father. In 2003, the third movie, "Rugrats Go Wild!", was released. It was a crossover between the Rugrats and The Wild Thornberrys, characters from another popular Nickelodeon show. A TV movie was also made, in which the babies see the future, into the their young teen years. This spun off into the show All Grown Up, which takes place nine years into the future.


	+	

Speed's skills on the racetrack are on par with those of the top ranking students at the Racing Academy. His skills are somewhat inherited, with Speed knowing the right timing, and maneuvers during racing. Despite his amazing talent, he is generally quite modest about his abilities and claims that his maneuvers are a result of instinct rather than skill. He is not in it for money or fame - he just wants to be "the best in the world", and to have fun. He befriends two of the school's students, Conor and Lucy. Together, they work as a team both inside and outside school grounds. −

Episodes[]

Main article: List of Rugrats episodes


	+	

Casually, Speed wears a blue long sleeve shirt with red stars embroidered on both sleeves. When racing, he dons a white and blue racing helmet with a large, stylized red "M" (which stands for Mifune Motors) atop the visor and a racing jacket that contains several references to the original anime and manga series. The jacket's collar is red, an homage to the red racing ascot tie the original Speed Racer had worn. The jacket's color scheme is mostly blue with white accents, a homage to the color scheme of the original Speed's outfit. Lastly, the jacket features several patches which contain references to the Japanese show, including the names such as "Go" and "Daisuke", the Japanese names of Speed and Pops Racer, respectively. At formal events such as the school dance, he wears a pale light blue shirt and light brown jacket and pants. −

Other projects[]

Main article: All Grown Up

Main article: Angelica and Susie's Pre-School Daze


Broadcast history[]

+

X Racer[]

	+	

Voiced by: Robbie Sublett

  • USA

    • Nickelodeon (1991-2007)

    • Nicktoons Network (2002-present)


	+	

Unknown whether "X" is his real or nickname, he is the oldest son of the original Speed Racer, and the number one racer at the Racing Academy. Known for his skills and abilities on the track, he is slick, handsome, and popular among the girls at school. While X appears to be a tough guy on the outside, he has a more kind-hearted personality than he leads other people to believe. He is initially shocked to find out that Speed is his younger brother, but becomes more accepting of the fact and develops a tough, brotherly bond with him and is always there to give advice. But just because Speed's his brother, doesn't mean X is willing to go easy on him. They are constantly each others' rivals on the track. He usually hangs out with Jared, Jesse, and his girlfriend, Annalise. He wears a gray A-Shirt and has a large "X" tattoo on his right arm. −

  • UK

    • Children's BBC (Including Live & Kicking) (1993-2004)

    • Nickelodeon UK (1994-Present)

    • Nicktoons (2002-2008)

    • CITV (2005-2006)

    • Nicktoonsters (2008-Present)


	+	

His car's name is the Shooting Star, a homage to X's uncle's (Rex Racer, known as Racer X) racing vehicle. Though the car retains none of the original Shooting Star's original color scheme, the vehicle dons the number 9 on both sides. It is unknown whether the original Speed Racer named him after Racer X, or if the Racing Academy had given the name to him. X had the Shooting Star rigged to activate an ejector chair which could transform into a mini helicopter. −

  • Australia

    • Nickelodeon Australia (1995-Present)

    • ABC Television

    • Network Ten


	+	

Spritle Racer[]

  • New Zealand
	+	

Voiced by: Peter Fernandez

    • Nickelodeon NZ (199?-Present)

    • TV3 (199?-Present)


	+	

He and Speed Racer are the only members of the original cast from the Japanese series in a major role. Spritle now runs the Academy founded by the Racer Family as the headmaster. While he is Speed and X's uncle and provides fatherly wisdom from time to time, he never bends the school rules for his nephews' sake. He is shown as a matured person in contrast to his childlike attitude in the original series, therefore, Spritle doesn't seem to be suspicious of anybody around him. Spritle remains clueless about Zile Zazic's evil scheme and usually sits behind the scenes during the climax of a given episode. −

  • Ireland

    • RTÉ Two


	+	

Lucy[]

  • Canada
	+	

Voiced by: Sahra Mellesse

    • Treehouse

    • YTV


	+	

A good friend of Speed and Conor, Lucy is the sensible one of the group. She wears a light blue mechanic’s uniform with the Racing Academy logo on it. Strict, open-minded, and studious, she often assists Conor with his work, but is a little bit bossy at times. While she is generally a friendly and calm individual, Lucy will occasionally insult Conor and bombard Speed with criticism. She always makes up for it by helping her friends. Lucy has formed a crush on Speed, as she has shown jealousy for any other girl who shows Speed affection in “Be Cruel To Your School” and “The Dance”. It is still unknown whether Speed knows these feelings, but since "The Dance", there is a good chance he might. −

  • Malaysia

    • Nickelodeon Malaysia

    • TV3 (199?-2006)


	+	

Trixie, Speed Sr.'s girlfriend, can be compared to Lucy, because her attitude and role in the series are very similar. Lucy doesn't appear to drive her own car, but in one episode, she pilots a small helicopter transformed from X's ejector seat. −

  • Netherlands

    • Nickelodeon


	+	

Conor[]

  • Ukraine
	+	

Voiced by: Carter Jackson

    • ICTV (Ukraine)


	+	

A poor racer, but a great mechanic, Conor is good friends with Speed and Lucy. One of his most defining characteristics is that he is a huge fan of Speed Racer Sr. to the point where his interest borders on obsession. He often cosplays in his Speed Racer outfit, has tons of memorabilia and merchandise in his dorm room, and knows everything there is to know about him and the Mach 5. His nerdish, hyperactive behavior and interests prevent him from making many friends- when Speed accepts him as one, he is eternally grateful and proves to be a reliable companion. Conor clearly has a crush on Annalise, despite of her being completely out of his league, and never having the feeling returned. −

  • Italy'

    • Italia 1


Awards[]

+

Chim-Chim[]

Annie[]

  • 1995 - Nominated - Best Individual Achievement for Writing in the Field of Animation


	+	

Conor built this robot based on the pet chimpanzee the headmaster used to own, but added countless gadgets and professional engineering skills. He is entirely loyal to Conor, and by extension, Speed and Lucy. Chim-Chim has a seemingly unlimited amount of uses, from transforming into a scooter, to storing anything inside the compartment in his stomach, to repairing the Mach Six while it's moving. However, that doesn't stop him from eating necessary car parts, or creating the usual kind of mischief all monkeys make. His belly has a lining of lead material, encasing the contents within the storage area, and protecting them from radiation, and magnetic deterioration. His control panel is behind the lid on his back. As a pantomime character, like R2-D2, he talks in electronic beeps. In "The Dance", he was modified into a date for Conor named "Chimantha". Conor's rival Ronald built a monkey similar to Chim-Chim, which he named Mich-Mich. −

Artios[]

  • 2000 to 2003 - Nominated - Best Casting for Animated Voice Over, Television


Daytime Emmy[]

+

Annalise Zazic[]

	+	

Voiced by: Michal Friedman

  • 1994, 2003 - Won - Outstanding Animated Children's Program

  • 2004 - Nominated - Outstanding Animated Children's Program


	+	

Annalise is X's girlfriend, and the second best racer in the school. A spoiled, selfish, whiny material girl, Annalise gets whatever she wants from her father, Zile Zazic, since they come from a rich family. She immediately dislikes Speed upon meeting him, since he's the new kid who gets picked upon in every school, and calls him "Newb" and "Speed Bump". Her discovery of him being X's brother only heightens her animosity for him, as he could be a possible competition for her own boyfriend, and becomes one of Speed's top enemies. But it seems that she has warmed up to Speed, making her boyfriend, X, jealous whenever she comes to Speed for help. −

Emmy[]

  • 1997, 1999 to 2002 - Nominated - Outstanding Children's Program


	+	

Snake Oiler, Speed Sr's racing rival in the original series can be compared to Annalise. His car number, 12, and attitude are very similar. −

Genesis[]

  • 1999 - Won - Television - Children's Programming


World Animation Celebration[]

+

Zile Zazic[]

	+	

Voiced by: Dave Skigen

  • 1999 - Won - Best Director of Animation for a Daytime Series


	+	

The academy would be nothing without Zile Zazic- he paid for, designed, and had the Academy's racing track "built for him". He also donated many buildings and additions to the school, and is on great terms with the headmaster and views X as the star student of the school. However, he has a vague, mysterious vendetta against Speed Racer from long ago, and once he discovers "Little Speed Jr." has built the Mach 6 from the Mach 5, he becomes his enemy in secret, carrying out undercover hits on him from his lair. This makes sense, since he is a rich oil tycoon, and the Mach 6's eco-friendly design could ruin him. He now not only wants to destroy the Mach 6, but Speed too. −

Kids' Choice Awards[]

  • 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999 - Won - Favorite Cartoon


Games[]

+

Minor Characters[]

	+	

Speed Racer[]

	+	

Voiced By: Peter Fernandez

	+	

Speed Racer is the father of Speed and X, which makes him the second known cast member from the 1967 Japanese show to appear here. He first appeared for a brief moment in the episode, "The Note". He states that he is not able to see Speed and X now, but he hopes to see them soon. They currently know that Speed Racer is not dead or missing, but is waiting for the right time to meet them face-to-face, when the time comes. −

  • Rugrats: Search for Reptar (PlayStation)

  • Rugrats: Studio Tour (PlayStation)

  • Rugrats: Scavenger Hunt (Nintendo 64)

  • Rugrats in Paris - The Movie (Nintendo 64, Game Boy Advance, PC CD Rom, PlayStation)

  • Rugrats: Totally Angelica (PlayStation, Game Boy Advance)

  • Rugrats: Totally Angelica Boredom Busters (PC-CD Rom)

  • Rugrats: Go Wild (PC-CD Rom, Game Boy Advance)

  • Rugrats: All Growed Up - Older and Bolder (PC-CD Rom)

  • Rugrats: Castle Capers (Game Boy Advance)

  • Rugrats: Royal Ransom (PlayStation 2, Nintendo GameCube)

  • Rugrats: I Gotta Go Party (Game Boy Advance)

  • Rugrats: The Movie (Game Boy Color)

  • Rugrats: Time Travellers (Game Boy Color)

  • Rugrats Activity Challenge (PC-CD Rom)

  • Rugrats Adventure Game (PC-CD Rom)

  • Rugrats Food Fight (Mobile Phone)

  • Rugrats Muchin Land (PC-CD Rom)

  • The Rugrats Mystery Adventures (PC-CD Rom)

  • Nicktoons Racing (Tommy and Angelica playable)

  • Nicktoons: Attack of the Toybots (Tommy and Angelica are seen, but are not playable characters.)

  • SpongeBob SquarePants featuring Nicktoons: Globs of Doom (PlayStation 2, Nintendo DS, Wii)


See also[]

+

Jared and Jesse[]

	+	

Voiced by: Michael SinterniklaasTemplate:Portalpar

  • Klasky-Csupo


	+	

Two twins who are part of X's student entourage, Jared and Jesse act as a team, and share the rank as the third best racers in the school. Normally rude and unpleasant, they often act as Annalise's bullish lackies. While they do their best to get the job done, both twins are equally incompetent. On the track, Jared and Jesse are a fearsome team. Although they race together in a single vehicle, the actual car has the ability to split into two pieces which both of them can operate separately for periods of time. They use this technique to surround a single opponent from both sides on the race track. −

References[]

	+	

	+	

Stan[]

	+	

Voiced by: David "Zen" Mansley

	+	
	+	

Stan is Zile's personal assistant and second-in-command, despite being clumsy and dimwitted most of the time. His large, monstrous size and gentle composure almost makes him look like a jolly giant, often getting in the way of the evil plans he is supposed to carry out. He is overly polite to everyone, and is deeply apologetic whenever he disobeys his boss. However, Stan is still serious about the job, and his mind is always on Zile's side.

	+	
	+	

Armand Aniskov[]

	+	

Voiced by: David "Zen" Mansley

	+	
	+	

Professor Aniskov is an instructor at the Racing Academy who teaches the class on offensive driving techniques. Stern and aloof, he rarely shows any signs of favoritism, and treats all of his students with the same air of indifference. He is probably one of the more critical instructors that the academy has to offer, and is not particularly well-liked by any of his students because of this. His behavior also appears to spread beyond the student body, as he once made a snide remark towards Headmaster Spritle after Speed's first qualifying race. The students often describe him as a mean professor, particularly Conor.

	+	
	+	

Susan Winn[]

	+	

Voiced by: Mami Kimura

	+	
	+	

Susan Winn is an intelligent and level-headed woman who teaches the class on defensive driving techniques at the Racing Academy. She is handicapped, and travels around in a sleek, motorized wheel-chair. Professor Winn is generally much kinder and more accepting of her students than Professor Aniskov, and is respected because of this. While displaying a sense of strict guidelines and acceptable conduct in her classes, she is a very fair individual.

	+	
	+	

Mach Five and Mach Six[]

	+	
	+	

The second episode features the rebuilt Mach 5 designed as it appeared in the original anime, only animated in CGI, like all of the other cars in the show's racing sequences. Minor changes have occurred in the Mach Five in this series. Although the function for the homing robot is present, it is redesigned to resemble more of a metal peacock than a sleek, futuristic robot dove. The Deflector is used as the roof of the Mach Five. Also revealed in this show is an ejector's seat underneath the driver's seat in case of emergencies. A parachute was made, but was forgotten to be installed at the time.

	+	
	+	

Its return is brief, as one of the antagonists destroys it successfully. However, plans for a new car are discovered and soon the protagonists retool the Mach Five to form the Mach 6. The Mach 6's engine is not designed to run on gas, which is a crucial story point, even though gas is still used for it through most of the series. It has all the features of the Mach Five, but redesigned or changed in some form or another. For example, the rotary saws are kept, but they're turned into laser saws. The new car features a transparent, holographic screen over the dashboard that the driver can use to interact live with his crew, and with other racers. Apparently, Speed mentions it can dispense rubber spiders out the back, and also real spiders, but he has not confirmed this.

	+	
	+	

The Mach 6 succeeds the Mach 5 for the rest of the series, and more of the original gadgets will be gradually revealed (such as the sludge slick) and used in future episodes.

	+	
	+	

Episodes[]

	+	

Season 1: 2008-present[]

	+	
	+	
+ # Title Director Writer Original Release Date Production code
	+	

{{Episode list

	+	
EpisodeNumber=1
	+	
Title=The Beginning, Part 1
	+	
WrittenBy= Justin Gray, James Palmiotti
	+	
DirectedBy= Stephen Moverley
	+	
OriginalAirDate=April 27, 2008[1]
	+	
ProdCode=101
	+	
ShortSummary=Speed arrives at the Racing Academy and meets all of the main cast. With no race car of his own, Conor lets him use a junky, spare one for the Qualifying Race. Having destroyed the car, his key, which was left to him by his mysterious father, glows, and leads him to find the Mach Five's hood disassembled from the other pieces of the car.
	+	
LineColor=0000FF
	+	

}}{{Episode list

	+	
EpisodeNumber=2
	+	
Title=The Beginning, Part 2
	+	
WrittenBy= Justin Gray, James Palmiotti
	+	
DirectedBy= Stephen Moverley
	+	
OriginalAirDate=May 2, 2008
	+	
ProdCode=102
	+	
ShortSummary=Speed and his friends rebuild the Mach 5 and test it out. However, Annalise, under Zile's orders, destroys it in a match against X. Spritle reveals a shocking suprise to Speed that he is Speed Racer's son, and is X's long lost Brother.
	+	
LineColor=0000FF
	+	

}}{{Episode list

	+	
EpisodeNumber=3
	+	
Title=The Beginning, Part 3
	+	
WrittenBy= Justin Gray, James Palmiotti
	+	
DirectedBy= Stephen Moverley
	+	
OriginalAirDate=May 2, 2008
	+	
ProdCode=103
	+	
ShortSummary=Speed and his friends discover the secret plans to build the Mach 6 and its unique engine from the remains of the Mach 5. Speed uses the new car to race once again against Annalise, and wins.
	+	
LineColor=0000FF
	+	

}}{{Episode list

	+	
EpisodeNumber=4
	+	
Title=Low Price of Fame
	+	
WrittenBy=Gerry Duggan
	+	
DirectedBy= John Holt
	+	
OriginalAirDate=May 9, 2008
	+	
ProdCode=104
	+	
ShortSummary=Speed takes advice from X on how to deal with the fame of being Speed Racer's son from his classmates. A crazy stalker student named Mitch spreads a rumor that Speed will have a rivalry race with his brother, X, which spirals into a real race. When Annalise sees X not taking this seriously, she stands up and sabotages Speed's car so X can win.
	+	
LineColor=0000FF
	+	

}}{{Episode list

	+	
EpisodeNumber=5
	+	
Title=Be Cruel To Your School
	+	
WrittenBy= Marv Wolfman
	+	
DirectedBy= John Holt
	+	
OriginalAirDate=May 16, 2008
	+	
ProdCode=105
	+	
ShortSummary=Speed and X must work together as a team in order to win a multi-school racing tournament. Meanwhile, Zile plans to ruin Speed and X's teamwork during the tournament to also destroy the Mach 6.
	+	
LineColor=0000FF
	+	

}}{{Episode list

	+	
EpisodeNumber=6
	+	
Title=The Note
	+	
WrittenBy= Aaron Bergeron
	+	
DirectedBy= John Holt
	+	
OriginalAirDate=May 23, 2008
	+	
ProdCode=106
	+	
ShortSummary=Speed gradually receives mysterious notes signed by his father, but he suspects that they could be false. When he receives another letter asking for Speed to come meet him, Speed goes to figure out who the imposter is. Meanwhile, Zile plans to have his birthday party. At the end of the episode, Speed receives what he and X believe is a real note from their father.
	+	
LineColor=0000FF
	+	

}}

	+	

{{Episode list

	+	
EpisodeNumber=7
	+	
Title=The Fast Track, Part 1
	+	
WrittenBy= Ben Gruber
	+	
DirectedBy= John Holt
	+	
OriginalAirDate= June 27, 2008[2]
	+	
ProdCode=107
	+	
ShortSummary=Thanks to Joel the lab technician, Zile takes over the virtual track to mess up Speed's race at the Redwood Rally so he doesn't survive. After Speed suspects whats going on, he decides to investigate, but in the process, Speed, Annalise and the Mach 6 all get sucked into the virtual track.
	+	
LineColor=0000FF
	+	

}}

	+	

{{Episode list

	+	
EpisodeNumber=8
	+	
Title=The Fast Track Part, 2
	+	
WrittenBy= Ben Gruber
	+	
DirectedBy= John Holt
	+	
OriginalAirDate= July 4, 2008[3]
	+	
ProdCode=108
	+	
ShortSummary=While Speed and Annalise are still stuck in the virtual track, they must put their differences aside to survive. Meanwhile, Conor, Lucy, and X must find a way to get them out before the track eats itself up due to the virus, or they'll be stuck there forever. Two vehicles from the original show- the Mammoth Car (from episodes 7 and 8) and the X3- make cameos in this episode.
	+	
LineColor=0000FF
	+	

}}

	+	

{{Episode list

	+	
EpisodeNumber=9
	+	
Title=The Fast Track, Part 3
	+	
WrittenBy= Ben Gruber
	+	
DirectedBy= John Holt
	+	
OriginalAirDate= July 11, 2008[4]
	+	
ProdCode=109
	+	
ShortSummary= Speed and Annalise make it out of the track. Delighted, Zile finds out Joel installed the virus, and decides to promote him to make the track more deadly for Speed and the Mach 6. One thing Zile is not aware of is that the Mammoth Car, the X3, and Jungle Conor invade the real world to wreck more havoc.
	+	
LineColor=0000FF
	+	

}}

	+	

{{Episode list

	+	
EpisodeNumber=10
	+	
Title= Honor Code
	+	
WrittenBy= Rob Klein
	+	
DirectedBy= John Holt
	+	
OriginalAirDate= July 25, 2008
	+	
ProdCode=110
	+	
ShortSummary= Speed is faced with expulsion when it appears he cheated in a race. Knowing that he was framed, Speed sets out to find the real culprit. Meanwhile, Chim-Chim has mysterious glitches.
	+	
LineColor=0000FF
	+	

}}

	+	

{{Episode list

	+	
EpisodeNumber=11
	+	
Title= The Dance
	+	
WrittenBy= Mike Yank
	+	
DirectedBy= John Holt
	+	
OriginalAirDate= August 1, 2008
	+	
ProdCode=111
	+	
ShortSummary= Annalise’s cousin, Elsa, arrives at the campus as an exchange student, in order to seduce Speed into giving out information about the Mach 6… just in time for the school dance. Lucy is suspicious of the girl's motives in wanting to date Speed. Meanwhile, with no date of his own, Conor takes drastic measures.
	+	
LineColor=0000FF
	+	

}}

	+	

{{Episode list

	+	
EpisodeNumber=12
	+	
Title= Top Car
	+	
WrittenBy= Daniel Schofield
	+	
DirectedBy= John Holt
	+	
OriginalAirDate= August 8, 2008
	+	
ProdCode=112
	+	
ShortSummary= Ronald Multon, an esteemed car designing prodigy and old rival of Conor’s, comes to the school as a guest lecturer. Furious that Ronald is in fact a complete hack, and stole all of his ideas, Conor challenges him to a design face-off, where they both bet each of their cars.
	+	
LineColor=0000FF
	+	

}}

	+	
	+	
	+	

DVD Releases[]

	+	

Season 1[]

	+	

The first DVD of the new series was released on May 6, 2008 by Lionsgate. It contains the first movie of the new series. The DVD was released on May 6, 2008 in NTSC ares. The PAL release date is unknown so far.

	+	

	+	
	+	
Volume Name
	+	
Release Date
	+	
Contains
	+	
+ Speed Racer: The Next Generation: The Beginning[5]
	+	
NTSC: May 6, 2008[5]
	+	

PAL: TBA

	+	
	+	

"The Beginning, Part 1"
"The Beginning, Part 2"
"The Beginning, Part 3"

	+	

Interactive Racing Game
Creating the Next Speed Racer Featurette
Bloopers and Stills[6]

	+	
+
	+	
	+	

References[]

	+	


External links[]

External links[]

	+	

Template:Wikiquote

	+	
  • Template:Imdb title

	+	

  • Rugrats at the Big Cartoon DataBase

+

	+	

  • Template:Imdb title

  • Template:Tv.com show


Template:RugratsNav

Template:TEENick


Template:Nicktoons

Template:Nicktoons

	+	

Template:Speed Racer

− + −


− + − + − + −

− − de:Rugrats

es:Rugrats

fr:Les Razmoket

it:Rugrats

he:ראגרטס

ms:Rugrats

nl:Ratjetoe (tekenfilmserie)

ja:ラグラッツ

pl:Pełzaki (serial animowany)

pt:Rugrats

ru:Неугомонные детки

simple:Rugrats

fi:Ipanat

tl:Rugrats

tr:Rugrats

Revision as of 12:59, 17 August 2008 Speed Racer: The Next Generation Created by Larry Schwarz (based on the original series created by Tatsuo Yoshida) Developed by Nickelodeon Studios Written by Ben Gruber Allan Neuwirth Marv Wolfman Susan Kim Justin Gray Jimmy Palmiotti Aaron Bergeron Daniel Schofield Mike Yank Directed by Stephen Moverley John Holt Starring Kurt Csolak Sahra Mellesse Carter Jackson Peter Fernandez Michael Sinterniklaas Robbie Sublett David Zen Mansley Opening theme "Go Speed Racer Go!", rearranged by John Angier Ending theme "Go Speed Racer Go!" (w/o vocals) Composer John Angier Country of origin United States No. of seasons 1 No. of episodes 12 Production Executive producers Larry Schwarz James Rocknowski John Rocknowski Producers Larry Schwarz Ken Katsumoto James Rocknowski John Rocknowski Sergei Aniskov Sean Lahey Christopher Fauci Michael Gold Doug MacLennon Running time 23 minutes (approx.) Release Original network Nickelodeon (2008) Nicktoons Network (2008-present) Original release May 2, 2008 – Present Chronology Preceded by Speed Racer Speed Racer X Related shows Three Delivery (2008-present) Kappa Mikey (2006-present) External links Website Speed Racer: The Next Generation is an American animated children's television series based on the classic Speed Racer franchise, in which the internal events take place decades after those in the 1967 Japanese series. It is the third television adaptation of the franchise, and is executive produced by Lions Gate Entertainment, Larry Schwarz, and Ken Katsumoto. It is the first Nicktoon not to be based on an original property. Animation Collective produces the series. Lionsgate is marketing this show as a direct continuation of the Japanese 1967 show, but whether or not this is an accurate, canonical succeeder is debatable.

This series was partly made to promote the live-action film, and the pilot movie premiered on Nicktoons Network on May 2, a week before the feature film adaptation was released in theatres.[1] However, both projects are produced independently from one another and feature different generations of "Speed Racers" (with the film featuring the original generation), though both feature a Mach 6.


Contents 1 Premise 2 Main Characters 2.1 Speed Racer Jr. 2.2 X Racer 2.3 Spritle Racer 2.4 Lucy 2.5 Conor 2.6 Chim-Chim 2.7 Annalise Zazic 2.8 Zile Zazic 3 Minor Characters 3.1 Speed Racer 3.2 Jared and Jesse 3.3 Stan 3.4 Armand Aniskov 3.5 Susan Winn 4 Mach Five and Mach Six 5 Episodes 5.1 Season 1: 2008-present 6 DVD Releases 6.1 Season 1 7 References 8 External links Premise This series takes place either in the present, or in the near future. Prior to the events of the series, the original Speed Racer has disappeared for unknown reasons, but the main characters know that he is alive. Only one of the original characters, Spritle, has a major role in this show. Speed Racer is seen briefly at the end of "The Note". The rest of the original cast are unseen, and their whereabouts are unknown.

The series follows the adventures of an orphan teenager named Speed who dreams of being a famed car racer like the one he is named after. He takes a bus to the elite Racing Academy, founded by the Racer family, and soon experiences the difficulties of fitting in and competing with X, the best racer/student in the school, and Speed Racer's son. Spritle himself is now the headmaster.

In the pilot movie, Speed discovers that he is the other son of Speed Racer, meaning that X is his brother. Through the rest of the series, Speed and his new allies set out on a quest to get through the courses, discover the mystery of Speed Racer's disappearance, and try and build the Mach Six, a car that captures the spirit and gadgets of the Mach 5 for new generations, and the first car to contain a gasless engine.

The most pivotal plot device is the virtual track, a race track that transports racers to virtual racing environments known as the Virtual World. School faculty can have the ability to add their own obstacles and as many obstacles as they wish, complying to school safety regulations. Whenever a racer is defeated in the track, they automatically get dispensed back onto the real one, unharmed. However, like all programs, the virtual track can be infested with viruses and/or hacked, causing anyone trapped in the Virtual World to be affected.

Main Characters Speed Racer Jr. Voiced by: Kurt Colak

The main character of the series, Speed Jr. is the second son of the original Speed Racer from the 1967 Japanese anime series. He was hidden from the public by both his father and Trixie, for unknown reasons. Speed grew up in an orphanage for the majority of his childhood. His parents had left him a special key and a red racing bandanna, both of which he kept with him for sentimental reasons. He is often awkward and shy, but being behind the wheel brings out the best in him. Unlike his father, Speed doesn't get into any perilous trouble of fighting thugs and gang members, therefore instead of fighting, Speed uses his racing skill. In the pilot movie, Conor mentions that he made it onto the leader boards, but it is still unclear where he is currently ranked.

Speed's skills on the racetrack are on par with those of the top ranking students at the Racing Academy. His skills are somewhat inherited, with Speed knowing the right timing, and maneuvers during racing. Despite his amazing talent, he is generally quite modest about his abilities and claims that his maneuvers are a result of instinct rather than skill. He is not in it for money or fame - he just wants to be "the best in the world", and to have fun. He befriends two of the school's students, Conor and Lucy. Together, they work as a team both inside and outside school grounds.

Casually, Speed wears a blue long sleeve shirt with red stars embroidered on both sleeves. When racing, he dons a white and blue racing helmet with a large, stylized red "M" (which stands for Mifune Motors) atop the visor and a racing jacket that contains several references to the original anime and manga series. The jacket's collar is red, an homage to the red racing ascot tie the original Speed Racer had worn. The jacket's color scheme is mostly blue with white accents, a homage to the color scheme of the original Speed's outfit. Lastly, the jacket features several patches which contain references to the Japanese show, including the names such as "Go" and "Daisuke", the Japanese names of Speed and Pops Racer, respectively. At formal events such as the school dance, he wears a pale light blue shirt and light brown jacket and pants.

X Racer Voiced by: Robbie Sublett

Unknown whether "X" is his real or nickname, he is the oldest son of the original Speed Racer, and the number one racer at the Racing Academy. Known for his skills and abilities on the track, he is slick, handsome, and popular among the girls at school. While X appears to be a tough guy on the outside, he has a more kind-hearted personality than he leads other people to believe. He is initially shocked to find out that Speed is his younger brother, but becomes more accepting of the fact and develops a tough, brotherly bond with him and is always there to give advice. But just because Speed's his brother, doesn't mean X is willing to go easy on him. They are constantly each others' rivals on the track. He usually hangs out with Jared, Jesse, and his girlfriend, Annalise. He wears a gray A-Shirt and has a large "X" tattoo on his right arm.

His car's name is the Shooting Star, a homage to X's uncle's (Rex Racer, known as Racer X) racing vehicle. Though the car retains none of the original Shooting Star's original color scheme, the vehicle dons the number 9 on both sides. It is unknown whether the original Speed Racer named him after Racer X, or if the Racing Academy had given the name to him. X had the Shooting Star rigged to activate an ejector chair which could transform into a mini helicopter.

Spritle Racer Voiced by: Peter Fernandez

He and Speed Racer are the only members of the original cast from the Japanese series in a major role. Spritle now runs the Academy founded by the Racer Family as the headmaster. While he is Speed and X's uncle and provides fatherly wisdom from time to time, he never bends the school rules for his nephews' sake. He is shown as a matured person in contrast to his childlike attitude in the original series, therefore, Spritle doesn't seem to be suspicious of anybody around him. Spritle remains clueless about Zile Zazic's evil scheme and usually sits behind the scenes during the climax of a given episode.

Lucy Voiced by: Sahra Mellesse

A good friend of Speed and Conor, Lucy is the sensible one of the group. She wears a light blue mechanic’s uniform with the Racing Academy logo on it. Strict, open-minded, and studious, she often assists Conor with his work, but is a little bit bossy at times. While she is generally a friendly and calm individual, Lucy will occasionally insult Conor and bombard Speed with criticism. She always makes up for it by helping her friends. Lucy has formed a crush on Speed, as she has shown jealousy for any other girl who shows Speed affection in “Be Cruel To Your School” and “The Dance”. It is still unknown whether Speed knows these feelings, but since "The Dance", there is a good chance he might.

Trixie, Speed Sr.'s girlfriend, can be compared to Lucy, because her attitude and role in the series are very similar. Lucy doesn't appear to drive her own car, but in one episode, she pilots a small helicopter transformed from X's ejector seat.

Conor Voiced by: Carter Jackson

A poor racer, but a great mechanic, Conor is good friends with Speed and Lucy. One of his most defining characteristics is that he is a huge fan of Speed Racer Sr. to the point where his interest borders on obsession. He often cosplays in his Speed Racer outfit, has tons of memorabilia and merchandise in his dorm room, and knows everything there is to know about him and the Mach 5. His nerdish, hyperactive behavior and interests prevent him from making many friends- when Speed accepts him as one, he is eternally grateful and proves to be a reliable companion. Conor clearly has a crush on Annalise, despite of her being completely out of his league, and never having the feeling returned.

Chim-Chim Conor built this robot based on the pet chimpanzee the headmaster used to own, but added countless gadgets and professional engineering skills. He is entirely loyal to Conor, and by extension, Speed and Lucy. Chim-Chim has a seemingly unlimited amount of uses, from transforming into a scooter, to storing anything inside the compartment in his stomach, to repairing the Mach Six while it's moving. However, that doesn't stop him from eating necessary car parts, or creating the usual kind of mischief all monkeys make. His belly has a lining of lead material, encasing the contents within the storage area, and protecting them from radiation, and magnetic deterioration. His control panel is behind the lid on his back. As a pantomime character, like R2-D2, he talks in electronic beeps. In "The Dance", he was modified into a date for Conor named "Chimantha". Conor's rival Ronald built a monkey similar to Chim-Chim, which he named Mich-Mich.

Annalise Zazic Voiced by: Michal Friedman

Annalise is X's girlfriend, and the second best racer in the school. A spoiled, selfish, whiny material girl, Annalise gets whatever she wants from her father, Zile Zazic, since they come from a rich family. She immediately dislikes Speed upon meeting him, since he's the new kid who gets picked upon in every school, and calls him "Newb" and "Speed Bump". Her discovery of him being X's brother only heightens her animosity for him, as he could be a possible competition for her own boyfriend, and becomes one of Speed's top enemies. But it seems that she has warmed up to Speed, making her boyfriend, X, jealous whenever she comes to Speed for help.

Snake Oiler, Speed Sr's racing rival in the original series can be compared to Annalise. His car number, 12, and attitude are very similar.

Zile Zazic Voiced by: Dave Skigen

The academy would be nothing without Zile Zazic- he paid for, designed, and had the Academy's racing track "built for him". He also donated many buildings and additions to the school, and is on great terms with the headmaster and views X as the star student of the school. However, he has a vague, mysterious vendetta against Speed Racer from long ago, and once he discovers "Little Speed Jr." has built the Mach 6 from the Mach 5, he becomes his enemy in secret, carrying out undercover hits on him from his lair. This makes sense, since he is a rich oil tycoon, and the Mach 6's eco-friendly design could ruin him. He now not only wants to destroy the Mach 6, but Speed too.

Minor Characters Speed Racer Voiced By: Peter Fernandez

Speed Racer is the father of Speed and X, which makes him the second known cast member from the 1967 Japanese show to appear here. He first appeared for a brief moment in the episode, "The Note". He states that he is not able to see Speed and X now, but he hopes to see them soon. They currently know that Speed Racer is not dead or missing, but is waiting for the right time to meet them face-to-face, when the time comes.

Jared and Jesse Voiced by: Michael Sinterniklaas

Two twins who are part of X's student entourage, Jared and Jesse act as a team, and share the rank as the third best racers in the school. Normally rude and unpleasant, they often act as Annalise's bullish lackies. While they do their best to get the job done, both twins are equally incompetent. On the track, Jared and Jesse are a fearsome team. Although they race together in a single vehicle, the actual car has the ability to split into two pieces which both of them can operate separately for periods of time. They use this technique to surround a single opponent from both sides on the race track.

Stan Voiced by: David "Zen" Mansley

Stan is Zile's personal assistant and second-in-command, despite being clumsy and dimwitted most of the time. His large, monstrous size and gentle composure almost makes him look like a jolly giant, often getting in the way of the evil plans he is supposed to carry out. He is overly polite to everyone, and is deeply apologetic whenever he disobeys his boss. However, Stan is still serious about the job, and his mind is always on Zile's side.

Armand Aniskov Voiced by: David "Zen" Mansley

Professor Aniskov is an instructor at the Racing Academy who teaches the class on offensive driving techniques. Stern and aloof, he rarely shows any signs of favoritism, and treats all of his students with the same air of indifference. He is probably one of the more critical instructors that the academy has to offer, and is not particularly well-liked by any of his students because of this. His behavior also appears to spread beyond the student body, as he once made a snide remark towards Headmaster Spritle after Speed's first qualifying race. The students often describe him as a mean professor, particularly Conor.

Susan Winn Voiced by: Mami Kimura

Susan Winn is an intelligent and level-headed woman who teaches the class on defensive driving techniques at the Racing Academy. She is handicapped, and travels around in a sleek, motorized wheel-chair. Professor Winn is generally much kinder and more accepting of her students than Professor Aniskov, and is respected because of this. While displaying a sense of strict guidelines and acceptable conduct in her classes, she is a very fair individual.

Mach Five and Mach Six The second episode features the rebuilt Mach 5 designed as it appeared in the original anime, only animated in CGI, like all of the other cars in the show's racing sequences. Minor changes have occurred in the Mach Five in this series. Although the function for the homing robot is present, it is redesigned to resemble more of a metal peacock than a sleek, futuristic robot dove. The Deflector is used as the roof of the Mach Five. Also revealed in this show is an ejector's seat underneath the driver's seat in case of emergencies. A parachute was made, but was forgotten to be installed at the time.

Its return is brief, as one of the antagonists destroys it successfully. However, plans for a new car are discovered and soon the protagonists retool the Mach Five to form the Mach 6. The Mach 6's engine is not designed to run on gas, which is a crucial story point, even though gas is still used for it through most of the series. It has all the features of the Mach Five, but redesigned or changed in some form or another. For example, the rotary saws are kept, but they're turned into laser saws. The new car features a transparent, holographic screen over the dashboard that the driver can use to interact live with his crew, and with other racers. Apparently, Speed mentions it can dispense rubber spiders out the back, and also real spiders, but he has not confirmed this.

The Mach 6 succeeds the Mach 5 for the rest of the series, and more of the original gadgets will be gradually revealed (such as the sludge slick) and used in future episodes.

Episodes Season 1: 2008-present

  1. Title Director Writer Original Release Date Production code

1 "The Beginning, Part 1" Stephen Moverley Justin Gray, James Palmiotti April 27, 2008[2] 101 Speed arrives at the Racing Academy and meets all of the main cast. With no race car of his own, Conor lets him use a junky, spare one for the Qualifying Race. Having destroyed the car, his key, which was left to him by his mysterious father, glows, and leads him to find the Mach Five's hood disassembled from the other pieces of the car. 2 "The Beginning, Part 2" Stephen Moverley Justin Gray, James Palmiotti May 2, 2008 102 Speed and his friends rebuild the Mach 5 and test it out. However, Annalise, under Zile's orders, destroys it in a match against X. Spritle reveals a shocking suprise to Speed that he is Speed Racer's son, and is X's long lost Brother. 3 "The Beginning, Part 3" Stephen Moverley Justin Gray, James Palmiotti May 2, 2008 103 Speed and his friends discover the secret plans to build the Mach 6 and its unique engine from the remains of the Mach 5. Speed uses the new car to race once again against Annalise, and wins. 4 "Low Price of Fame" John Holt Gerry Duggan May 9, 2008 104 Speed takes advice from X on how to deal with the fame of being Speed Racer's son from his classmates. A crazy stalker student named Mitch spreads a rumor that Speed will have a rivalry race with his brother, X, which spirals into a real race. When Annalise sees X not taking this seriously, she stands up and sabotages Speed's car so X can win. 5 "Be Cruel To Your School" John Holt Marv Wolfman May 16, 2008 105 Speed and X must work together as a team in order to win a multi-school racing tournament. Meanwhile, Zile plans to ruin Speed and X's teamwork during the tournament to also destroy the Mach 6. 6 "The Note" John Holt Aaron Bergeron May 23, 2008 106 Speed gradually receives mysterious notes signed by his father, but he suspects that they could be false. When he receives another letter asking for Speed to come meet him, Speed goes to figure out who the imposter is. Meanwhile, Zile plans to have his birthday party. At the end of the episode, Speed receives what he and X believe is a real note from their father. 7 "The Fast Track, Part 1" John Holt Ben Gruber June 27, 2008[3] 107 Thanks to Joel the lab technician, Zile takes over the virtual track to mess up Speed's race at the Redwood Rally so he doesn't survive. After Speed suspects whats going on, he decides to investigate, but in the process, Speed, Annalise and the Mach 6 all get sucked into the virtual track. 8 "The Fast Track Part, 2" John Holt Ben Gruber July 4, 2008[4] 108 While Speed and Annalise are still stuck in the virtual track, they must put their differences aside to survive. Meanwhile, Conor, Lucy, and X must find a way to get them out before the track eats itself up due to the virus, or they'll be stuck there forever. Two vehicles from the original show- the Mammoth Car (from episodes 7 and 8) and the X3- make cameos in this episode. 9 "The Fast Track, Part 3" John Holt Ben Gruber July 11, 2008[5] 109 Speed and Annalise make it out of the track. Delighted, Zile finds out Joel installed the virus, and decides to promote him to make the track more deadly for Speed and the Mach 6. One thing Zile is not aware of is that the Mammoth Car, the X3, and Jungle Conor invade the real world to wreck more havoc. 10 "Honor Code" John Holt Rob Klein July 25, 2008 110 Speed is faced with expulsion when it appears he cheated in a race. Knowing that he was framed, Speed sets out to find the real culprit. Meanwhile, Chim-Chim has mysterious glitches. 11 "The Dance" John Holt Mike Yank August 1, 2008 111 Annalise’s cousin, Elsa, arrives at the campus as an exchange student, in order to seduce Speed into giving out information about the Mach 6… just in time for the school dance. Lucy is suspicious of the girl's motives in wanting to date Speed. Meanwhile, with no date of his own, Conor takes drastic measures. 12 "Top Car" John Holt Daniel Schofield August 8, 2008 112 Ronald Multon, an esteemed car designing prodigy and old rival of Conor’s, comes to the school as a guest lecturer. Furious that Ronald is in fact a complete hack, and stole all of his ideas, Conor challenges him to a design face-off, where they both bet each of their cars. DVD Releases Season 1 The first DVD of the new series was released on May 6, 2008 by Lionsgate. It contains the first movie of the new series. The DVD was released on May 6, 2008 in NTSC ares. The PAL release date is unknown so far.

Volume Name Release Date Contains Speed Racer: The Next Generation: The Beginning[6] NTSC: May 6, 2008[6] PAL: TBA

"The Beginning, Part 1" "The Beginning, Part 2" "The Beginning, Part 3" Interactive Racing Game Creating the Next Speed Racer Featurette Bloopers and Stills[7]

References

AWN Headline News
Nickelodeon aired P1 to show a sneek peak of the new series.
http://www.tvguide.com/detail/tv-show.aspx?tvobjectid=293428&more=ucepisodelist&episodeid=8012157 Speed Racer: TNG s1 ep7
Speed Racer: The Next Generation Episodes | TVGuide.com
Speed Racer: The Next Generation Episodes | TVGuide.com
"New Speed Racer Movie released on May 6th, 2008". Lionsgate. Retrieved 2008-05-24.
http://www.lionsgateshop.com/product.asp?Id=11137&TitleParentId=4996&View=SpecialFeatures Special Features from the DVD

External links Official Speed Racer site Speed Racer: The Next Generation on IMDb Speed Racer Deals Cross Finish Line NYCC 08: Speed Racer's Next Generation Revealed TV Guide's Speed Racer: The Next Generation episodes Template:Nicktoons

vte Speed Racer by Tatsuo Yoshida Franchise MangaAnimeThe New AdventuresXThe Next Generation episodescharactersFilm soundtrackRace to the Future Video games The Challenge of Racer XMy Most Dangerous AdventuresSpeed Racer (1995)Speed Racer (1996)Speed Racer (2008) Miscellaneous Mach FiveRacer XLego Speed Racer Categories: Speed RacerAnimated television seriesAnime-influenced animation2008 television series debutsTelevision series by Lionsgate Television Navigation menu Not logged in Talk Contributions Create account Log in ArticleTalk ReadView sourceView historySearch Search Wikipedia Main page Contents Current events Random article About Wikipedia Contact us Donate Contribute Help Learn to edit Community portal Recent changes Upload file Tools What links here Related changes Special pages Permanent link Page information Cite this page Wikidata item Print/export Download as PDF Printable version

Languages Español עברית Magyar Português Русский ไทย Edit links This page was last edited on 17 August 2008, at 12:59 (UTC). This version of the page has been revised. Besides normal editing, the reason for revision may have been that this version contains factual inaccuracies, vandalism, or material not compatible with the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License. Privacy policyAbout WikipediaDisclaimersContact WikipediaMobile viewDevelopersStatisticsCookie statementEnable previews Wikimedia FoundationPowered by MediaWiki Rugrats and Speed Racer: The Next Generation: Difference between pages From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (Difference between pages) Jump to navigationJump to search Revision as of 13:11, 16 August 2009 (view source) Marcus2 (talk | contribs) (this can change as SpongeBob is still going strong)

Revision as of 22:55, 9 August 2009 (edit) Bearcat (talk | contribs) (recat using AWB)

Line 1: Line 1: − Template:Dablink

Template:For

{{Infobox Television

{{Infobox Television − | show_name = Rugrats +

| show_name = Speed Racer: The Next Generation

− | image = 250px +

| image = 250px
	+	
| creator = Larry Schwarz
(based on the original series created by Tatsuo Yoshida)

− | caption = "Rugrats" Title card

	+	
| format = Animated sitcom science-fiction

− | show_name_2 =

	+	
| starring = Kurt Csolak
Sahra Mellesse
Carter Jackson
Peter Fernandez
Michael Sinterniklaas
Robbie Sublett
David Zen Mansley

− | genre = Animation / Comedy / Family / Fantasy

	+	
| producer = Larry Schwarz
Ken Katsumoto
James Rocknowski
John Rocknowski
Sergei Aniskov
Sean Lahey
Christopher Fauci
Michael Gold
Doug MacLennon

− | format = Animated TV series

	+	
| writer = Ben Gruber
Allan Neuwirth
Marv Wolfman
Susan Kim
Justin Gray
Jimmy Palmiotti
Aaron Bergeron
Daniel Schofield
Mike Yank
Walt Gardner
James Harvey

− | creator = Arlene Klasky
Gabor Csupo
Paul Germain

	+	
| director = Stephen Moverley
John Holt

− | writer = Joe Ansolabehere
Craig Bartlett
Kate Boutilier
Michael Ferris
Peter Gaffney
Paul Germain
Jonathan Greenberg
Rachel Lipman
Jeffrey Townsend
Steve Viksten
Tom Mason
Dan Danko
Jeff Wynne
Melody Fox

	+	
| opentheme = "Go Speed Racer Go!", rearranged by John Angier

− | director = Howard Baker
Rick Bugental
Jim Duffy
Steve Moore
Steve Socki
Dan Thompson
Norton Virgien

	+	
| endtheme = "Go Speed Racer Go!" (w/o vocals)

− | creative_director = Paul Germain

	+	
| composer = John Angier

− | starring =

	+	
| country = Template:USA

− | voices = E.G. Daily
Christine Cavanaugh
Nancy Cartwright
Kath Soucie
Cheryl Chase
Tara Strong
Cree Summer
Dionne Quan
Melanie Chartoff
Jack Riley
Michael Bell
Tress MacNeille
David Doyle
Philip Proctor
Joe Alaskey
Julia Kato

	+	
| num_seasons = 1

− | narrated =

	+	
| num_episodes = 26

− | theme_music_composer = Denis Hannigan

	+	
| list_episodes = List of Speed Racer: The Next Generation episodes

− | opentheme = The Rugrats Theme

	+	
| status = Currently Airing

− | endtheme = The Rugrats Theme (Speed Up and Remixed)

	+	
| runtime = 30 minutes (approx.)

− | composer = Mark Mothersbaugh
Robert Mothersbaugh
Denis Hannigan
Rusty Andrews

− | country = United States +

| developer = Nickelodeon Studios
	+	
| network = Nickelodeon (2008)
Nicktoons Network (2008-present)
(Other Network)
Template:FlagiconCartoon Network (Pakistan)
Template:FlagiconTemplate:FlagiconTemplate:FlagiconTemplate:FlagiconTemplate:FlagiconTemplate:Flagicon Nickelodeon Latin America

− | language = English

	+	
| executive_producer= Larry Schwarz
James Rocknowski
John Rocknowski

− | num_seasons = 12 seasons

	+	
| preceded_by = Speed Racer
Speed Racer X

− | num_episodes = 172 episodes

	+	
| related = Three Delivery
(2008-present)
Kappa Mikey
(2006-2008)

− | list_episodes = List of Rugrats episodes

	+	
| first_aired = May 2, 2008 

− | executive_producer = Vanessa Coffey
Gabor Csupo
Arlene Klasky

	+	
| last_aired = Present

− | producer = Cella Nichols Harris
Geraldine Clarke
David Blum
Paul Germain
Kate Boutilier

	+	
| website = http://www.lionsgate.com/speedracer/

− | editor = Karl Garabedian

	+	
}}

− | location = Universal Studios Florida

	+	

Speed Racer: The Next Generation is an American animated television series based on the classic Japanese Speed Racer franchise, in which the internal events take place decades after those in the 1967 Japanese series. It is the third television adaptation of the franchise, and is executive produced by Lions Gate Entertainment, Larry Schwarz, and Ken Katsumoto. It is the first Nicktoon not to be based on an original property, a pattern that Nicktoons appears to be adapting with Wolverine and the X-Men and Iron Man: Armored Adventures. Animation Collective produced the series, while the Flash character animation was handled by the now-defunct Collideascope Studios as their very last project. Regardless as to whether or not this is a canonical succeeder, references to the original show are amazingly accurate. The last episode features the voice of NASCAR racer Jeff Gordon, who plays Turbo McCalister. − | cinematography = Animation

− | camera = Single-camera

− | runtime = 30 min

− | company = Klasky Csupo

− | distributor = Paramount Home Entertainment

− | channel = Nickelodeon

− | picture_format = NTSC

− | audio_format = Surround

− | first_aired = August 11, 1991

− | last_aired = May 29, 1994, & December 6, 1996 - June 8, 2004

− | status =

− | preceded_by =

− | followed_by = All Grown Up!
(2003-2008)

− | related =

− | website = http://www.cooltoons2.com/rugrats/

− | production_website = http://www.nick.com/shows/rugrats/index.jhtml

− }}

− − Rugrats is an American animated television series created by Arlene Klasky, Gábor Csupó, and Paul Germain for Nickelodeon. The series premiered on Sunday August 11, 1991 and aired its last episode on Tuesday June 8, 2004.

− The show centers around four babies and their day-to-day lives, usually involving common life experiences that become adventures in the babies' imaginations. It was one of the first three Nicktoons and also aired on Nick Jr. in 1996.

− −

Premise[]

− The show originally revolved around a group of toddlers, Thomas "Tommy" Pickles (whose family moved from Akron, Ohio to their current location in California[1]), Charles "Chuckie" Finster, and the twins Phillip "Phil" and Lillian "Lil" DeVille. The toddlers are able to communicate with each other through baby speak, although viewers can understand them, because it is 'translated'. Often, they mispronounce words or use poor grammar and their speaking is full of malapropisms. An example of this is using the word "poopetrator" instead of "perpetrator." The group is often reluctantly joined by Tommy's cousin, Angelica Pickles. At age three years old, Angelica is able to communicate and understand language from both the toddlers and the adults, which she often uses as an advantage when she wants to manipulate either party. She is usually very mean to the babies. Susie Carmichael, who lives across the street from the Pickles, is also able to communicate on the same level as Angelica, though she isn't manipulative. As a result, Angelica and Susie often clash.[2]

− − In 1998, a new character was introduced. After The Rugrats Movie, in which Tommy's baby brother Dylan "Dil" Pickles is born, he was soon added as a character on the show. As a four month old baby, Dil is not able to communicate with anyone. Later in 2000, after Rugrats in Paris: The Movie was released, Kimi Finster was added as a character. She is Chuckie's stepsister.[2]

− −

Characters[]

Main article: List of Rugrats characters

File:Rugrats.JPG

The main babies. Clockwise from top: Tommy, Chuckie, Angelica, Lil, Phil, Dil, Kimi, and Susie.

− The Pickles are a mixed Jewish-Christian family. There are two episodes that reflect the Pickles' Jewish heritage, one episode deals with the Passover holiday and the other with Hanukkah (in addition to episodes about Christmas, Easter, Kwanzaa, etc.). These episodes have been praised by Jewish groups and are re-run every year on Nick at the appropriate holiday times and can also be purchased on VHS or DVD.

− −

Production[]

− Rugrats was Nickelodeon's second Nicktoon. The series was in production from 1991 to 1994, and again from 1996 to 2004. It aired in Nickelodeon's Snick block from 1997-2000. It is the longest lasting Nicktoon to date, at over fourteen years longevity. The Rugrats received a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame in a ceremony on June 28, 2001.

− − The show airs in the UK on CBBC, CITV, Nicktoons, Nickelodeon UK and Nicktoonsters as well as in Canada on YTV. In Australia, it can be seen on Nickelodeon Australia (and, for a period, ABC Television).

− − On August 11, 2001, Rugrats celebrated its 10 year anniversary. The special/TV movie, "Rugrats: All Growed Up" was produced for the occasion. After the show, a special retrospective lookback aired, entitled Rugrats: Still Babies After All These Years. It was narrated by Amanda Bynes.

− − The show ended in 2004 then afterwards, two fairy tale themed direct-to-video films based on the original series under the title, "Rugrats: Tales from the Crib" were planned and then released separately in 2005 and in 2006.

− −

Theatrical films[]

− In 1998, the first Rugrats film was released, entitled The Rugrats Movie, which introduced baby Dil, Tommy's little brother, onto the show. In 2000 the second movie, Rugrats in Paris, was released, with two new characters introduced, Kimi and Kira. Kimi would become Chuckie's sister and Kira would become his new mother, after marrying his father. In 2003, the third movie, Rugrats Go Wild, was released. It was a crossover between the Rugrats and The Wild Thornberrys.

− −

Reception[]

− In a 1995 interview Steven Spielberg referred to Rugrats as one of several shows that are the best children's programming at the time. Spielberg described Rugrats as "sort of a TV Peanuts of our time."[3] It was named the 92nd best animated series by IGN.[4]

− −

Episodes[]

Main article: List of Rugrats episodes

− −

Other projects[]

Main article: All Grown Up!

Main article: Angelica and Susie's Pre-School Daze

− −

DVD Release[]

− Nickelodeon and Amazon.com have struck a deal to produce DVDs of new and old Nickelodeon shows, through the CreateSpace service. Using a concept similar to print on demand, Amazon will be making the discs, cover art, and disc art itself. The first and second seasons of Rugrats are on sale.[5]

− −

Broadcast history[]

  • Template:Flagicon USA

    • Nickelodeon (1991-2007)

    • Nicktoons Network (2002-present)

− −

  • Template:Flagicon UK

    • Children's BBC (Including Live & Kicking) (1993-2004)

    • Nickelodeon (1994-2009)

    • Nicktoons (2002-2008)

    • CITV (2005-2006)

    • Nicktoonsters (August 2008-July 2009)

− −

  • Template:Flagicon Argentina

    • The Big Channel

    • Magic Kids

    • Nickelodeon

    • Canal 9

− −

  • Template:Flagicon Australia

    • Nickelodeon Australia (1995-Present)

    • ABC Television

    • Network Ten


	+	

This series was partly made to promote the live-action film, and the pilot movie premiered on Nicktoons Network on May 2, a week before the feature film adaptation was released in theatres.[6] However, both projects were produced independently from one another and featured different generations of "Speed Racers" (with the film featuring the original generation), though both featured a Mach 6. −

  • Template:Flagicon New Zealand

    • Nickelodeon NZ (199?-Present)

    • TV3 (199?-Present)


	+	

Premise[]

  • Template:Flagicon Philippines

    • TV5

    • Nickelodeon South East Asia

    • Studio 23


	+	

Prior to the events of the series, the original Speed Racer has disappeared for unknown reasons, but the main characters know that he is alive. Only one of the original characters, Spritle, has a major role in this show. Speed Racer is seen briefly at the end of The Note and more recently in Plot for Teacher. The rest of the original cast are unseen, and their whereabouts are currently unknown. −

  • Template:Flagicon Ireland

    • RTÉ Two (199? - Present)


	+	

The series follows the adventures of an orphan teenager named Speed who dreams of being a famed car racer like the one he is named after. He takes a bus to the elite Racing Academy, founded by the Racer family, and soon experiences the difficulties of fitting in and competing with X, the best racer/student in the school, and Speed Racer's son. Spritle himself is now the headmaster. −

  • Template:Flagicon Canada

    • YTV


	+	

In the pilot movie, Speed discovers that he is the other son of Speed Racer, meaning that X is his brother. Through the rest of the series, Speed and his new allies set out on a quest to get through the courses, discover the mystery of Speed Racer's disappearance, and try and build the Mach 6, a car that captures the spirit and gadgets of the Mach 5 for new generations, and the first car to contain a gasless engine. −

  • Template:Flagicon Malaysia

    • Nickelodeon South East Asia

    • TV3 (1992-1994)

    • MetroVision (1996-1998)

    • NTV7 (2001-2004)


	+	

The most pivotal plot device is the virtual track, a race track that transports racers to virtual racing environments known as the Virtual World. School faculty have the ability to add as many of their own obstacles as they wish, complying to school safety regulations. Whenever a racer is defeated in the track, they automatically get dispensed back onto the real one, unharmed. However, like all programs, the virtual track can be infested with viruses and/or hacked, causing anyone trapped in the Virtual World to be affected. −

  • Template:Flagicon Netherlands

    • Nickelodeon


	+	

Characters[]

  • Template:Flagicon Ukraine
	+	
Main article: List of Speed Racer: The Next Generation Characters

    • ICTV (Ukraine)


	+	

Mach Five and Mach Six[]

  • Template:Flagicon Italy

    • Italia 1


	+	

The second episode features the rebuilt Mach 5 designed as it appeared in the original anime, only animated in CGI, like all of the other cars in the show's racing sequences. Minor changes have occurred in the Mach Five in this series. Although the function for the homing robot is present, it is redesigned to resemble more of a metal peacock than a sleek, futuristic robot dove. The Deflector is used as the roof of the Mach Five. Also revealed in this show is an ejector's seat underneath the driver's seat in case of emergencies. A parachute was made, but was forgotten to be installed at the time. −

  • Template:Flagicon Mexico'

    • Nickelodeon Latin America 1996 - 2006

    • XHGC-TV Canal 5 (1997 - 2001), repeats episodes sometimes.


	+	

Its return is brief, as Zile Zazic destroys it successfully- the original makes a cameo in Plot for Teacher. However, plans for a new car are discovered and soon the protagonists rebuild the Mach Five to form the Mach 6. The Mach 6's engine is not designed to run on gas, which is a crucial story point, even though gas is still used for it through most of the series. It has all the features of the Mach Five, but redesigned or changed in some form or another. For example, the rotary saws are kept, but they're turned into laser saws. Also, the car has become more of a silver color with a fan in front and also includes two functional jets in the back where the fans were, and are used to get out of situations like a tornado ( as seen in the episode 'The Dance') or to help with acceleration. The new car features a transparent, holographic screen (better known as the 'comp') over the dashboard that the driver can use to interact live with his crew, and with other racers. Apparently, Speed mentions it can dispense rubber spiders out the back, and also real spiders, but he has not confirmed this. −

Awards[]

− −

Year

Association

Award Category

Result

1993

Daytime Emmy Award

Outstanding Animated Children's Program

Won

1995

Annie Award

Best Individual Achievement for Writing in the Field of Animation

Nominated

1996

Kids' Choice Awards

Favorite Cartoon

Won

1997

Emmy Award

Outstanding Children's Program

Nominated

Kids' Choice Awards

Favorite Cartoon

Won

1998

Kids' Choice Awards

Favorite Cartoon

Won

1999

Emmy Award

Outstanding Children's Program

Nominated

Genesis Award

Television - Children's Programming

Won

Kids' Choice Awards

Favorite Cartoon

Won

World Animation Celebration

Best Director of Animation for a Daytime Series

Won

2000

Artios Award

Best Casting for Animated Voice Over - Television

Nominated

Emmy Award

Outstanding Children's Program

Nominated

2001

Artios Award

Best Casting for Animated Voice Over - Television

Nominated

Emmy Award

Outstanding Children's Program

Nominated

2002

Artios Award

Best Casting for Animated Voice Over - Television

Nominated

Emmy Award

Outstanding Children's Program

Nominated

2003

Artios Award

Best Casting for Animated Voice Over - Television

Nominated

Daytime Emmy Award

Outstanding Animated Children's Program

Won

2004

Daytime Emmy Award

Outstanding Animated Children's Program

Nominated


	+	

The Mach 6 succeeds the Mach 5 for the rest of the series, and more of the original gadgets will be gradually revealed (such as the sludge slick) and used in future episodes. −

Video games[]

  • Rugrats: Search for Reptar (PlayStation)

  • Rugrats: Studio Tour (PlayStation)

  • Rugrats: Scavenger Hunt (Nintendo 64)

  • Rugrats in Paris - The Movie (Nintendo 64, Game Boy Advance, PC CD Rom, PlayStation)

  • Rugrats: Totally Angelica (PlayStation, Game Boy Advance)

  • Rugrats: Totally Angelica Boredom Busters (PC CD Rom)

  • Rugrats: Go Wild (PC CD Rom, Game Boy Advance)

  • Rugrats: All Growed Up - Older and Bolder (PC CD Rom)

  • Rugrats: Castle Capers (Game Boy Advance)

  • Rugrats: Royal Ransom (PlayStation 2, Nintendo GameCube)

  • Rugrats: I Gotta Go Party (Game Boy Advance)

  • Rugrats: The Movie (Game Boy Color)

  • Rugrats: Time Travelers (Game Boy Color)

  • Rugrats Activity Challenge (PC CD Rom)

  • Rugrats Adventure Game (PC CD Rom)

  • Rugrats Food Fight (Mobile Phone)

  • Rugrats Muchin Land (PC CD Rom)

  • The Rugrats Mystery Adventures (PC CD Rom)

  • Rocket Power: Team Rocket Rescue (PlayStation) (Tommy & Angelica appear as guest characters)

  • Nicktoons Racing (PlayStation, Game Boy Advance, Game Boy Color, Microsoft Windows, Arcade) (Tommy and Angelica playable)

  • Nicktoons: Attack of the Toybots (Wii, Nintendo DS, PlayStation 2, Game Boy Advance) (Tommy and Angelica are seen, but are not playable characters.)

  • Nicktoons: The Videogame (possibly)


See also[]

+

Episodes & DVDs[]

	+	
Main article: List of Speed Racer: The Next Generation episodes

Template:Portalpar

  • Klasky-Csupo


References[]

References[]

Line 271: Line 58:


External links[]

External links[]

	+	

Template:Wikiquote

	+	
  • Template:Imdb title

	+	
  • Template:Tv.com

  • Template:Imdb title
	+	

  • Template:Tv.com show

+

	+	

  • Rugrats at the Big Cartoon DataBase


Template:Rugrats

Template:TEENick


Template:Nicktoons

Template:Nicktoons

	+	

Template:Speed Racer

− + − + − + − + − + −


	+	

es:Meteoro: La Nueva Generaciónda:Rollinger (filmserie)

	+	

pt:Speed Racer Nova Geraçãode:Rugrats

es:Rugrats

fr:Les Razmoket

it:Rugrats

he:ראגרטס

la:Rugrats

ms:Rugrats

nl:Ratjetoe (tekenfilmserie)

ja:ラグラッツ

pl:Pełzaki (serial animowany)

pt:Rugrats

ru:Ох уж эти детки (мультсериал)

simple:Rugrats

fi:Ipanat

sv:Rugrats

tl:Rugrats

tr:Rugrats

Revision as of 22:55, 9 August 2009 Speed Racer: The Next Generation 250px Created by Larry Schwarz (based on the original series created by Tatsuo Yoshida) Developed by Nickelodeon Studios Written by Ben Gruber Allan Neuwirth Marv Wolfman Susan Kim Justin Gray Jimmy Palmiotti Aaron Bergeron Daniel Schofield Mike Yank Walt Gardner James Harvey Directed by Stephen Moverley John Holt Starring Kurt Csolak Sahra Mellesse Carter Jackson Peter Fernandez Michael Sinterniklaas Robbie Sublett David Zen Mansley Opening theme "Go Speed Racer Go!", rearranged by John Angier Ending theme "Go Speed Racer Go!" (w/o vocals) Composer John Angier Country of origin United States No. of seasons 1 No. of episodes 26 (list of episodes) Production Executive producers Larry Schwarz James Rocknowski John Rocknowski Producers Larry Schwarz Ken Katsumoto James Rocknowski John Rocknowski Sergei Aniskov Sean Lahey Christopher Fauci Michael Gold Doug MacLennon Running time 30 minutes (approx.) Release Original network Nickelodeon (2008) Nicktoons Network (2008-present) (Other Network) PakistanCartoon Network (Pakistan) BrazilMexicoPanamaArgentinaChileVenezuela Nickelodeon Latin America Original release May 2, 2008 – Present Chronology Preceded by Speed Racer Speed Racer X Related shows Three Delivery (2008-present) Kappa Mikey (2006-2008) External links Website Speed Racer: The Next Generation is an American animated television series based on the classic Japanese Speed Racer franchise, in which the internal events take place decades after those in the 1967 Japanese series. It is the third television adaptation of the franchise, and is executive produced by Lions Gate Entertainment, Larry Schwarz, and Ken Katsumoto. It is the first Nicktoon not to be based on an original property, a pattern that Nicktoons appears to be adapting with Wolverine and the X-Men and Iron Man: Armored Adventures. Animation Collective produced the series, while the Flash character animation was handled by the now-defunct Collideascope Studios as their very last project. Regardless as to whether or not this is a canonical succeeder, references to the original show are amazingly accurate. The last episode features the voice of NASCAR racer Jeff Gordon, who plays Turbo McCalister.

This series was partly made to promote the live-action film, and the pilot movie premiered on Nicktoons Network on May 2, a week before the feature film adaptation was released in theatres.[1] However, both projects were produced independently from one another and featured different generations of "Speed Racers" (with the film featuring the original generation), though both featured a Mach 6.


Contents 1 Premise 2 Characters 3 Mach Five and Mach Six 4 Episodes & DVDs 5 References 6 External links Premise Prior to the events of the series, the original Speed Racer has disappeared for unknown reasons, but the main characters know that he is alive. Only one of the original characters, Spritle, has a major role in this show. Speed Racer is seen briefly at the end of The Note and more recently in Plot for Teacher. The rest of the original cast are unseen, and their whereabouts are currently unknown.

The series follows the adventures of an orphan teenager named Speed who dreams of being a famed car racer like the one he is named after. He takes a bus to the elite Racing Academy, founded by the Racer family, and soon experiences the difficulties of fitting in and competing with X, the best racer/student in the school, and Speed Racer's son. Spritle himself is now the headmaster.

In the pilot movie, Speed discovers that he is the other son of Speed Racer, meaning that X is his brother. Through the rest of the series, Speed and his new allies set out on a quest to get through the courses, discover the mystery of Speed Racer's disappearance, and try and build the Mach 6, a car that captures the spirit and gadgets of the Mach 5 for new generations, and the first car to contain a gasless engine.

The most pivotal plot device is the virtual track, a race track that transports racers to virtual racing environments known as the Virtual World. School faculty have the ability to add as many of their own obstacles as they wish, complying to school safety regulations. Whenever a racer is defeated in the track, they automatically get dispensed back onto the real one, unharmed. However, like all programs, the virtual track can be infested with viruses and/or hacked, causing anyone trapped in the Virtual World to be affected.

Characters Main article: List of Speed Racer: The Next Generation Characters Mach Five and Mach Six The second episode features the rebuilt Mach 5 designed as it appeared in the original anime, only animated in CGI, like all of the other cars in the show's racing sequences. Minor changes have occurred in the Mach Five in this series. Although the function for the homing robot is present, it is redesigned to resemble more of a metal peacock than a sleek, futuristic robot dove. The Deflector is used as the roof of the Mach Five. Also revealed in this show is an ejector's seat underneath the driver's seat in case of emergencies. A parachute was made, but was forgotten to be installed at the time.

Its return is brief, as Zile Zazic destroys it successfully- the original makes a cameo in Plot for Teacher. However, plans for a new car are discovered and soon the protagonists rebuild the Mach Five to form the Mach 6. The Mach 6's engine is not designed to run on gas, which is a crucial story point, even though gas is still used for it through most of the series. It has all the features of the Mach Five, but redesigned or changed in some form or another. For example, the rotary saws are kept, but they're turned into laser saws. Also, the car has become more of a silver color with a fan in front and also includes two functional jets in the back where the fans were, and are used to get out of situations like a tornado ( as seen in the episode 'The Dance') or to help with acceleration. The new car features a transparent, holographic screen (better known as the 'comp') over the dashboard that the driver can use to interact live with his crew, and with other racers. Apparently, Speed mentions it can dispense rubber spiders out the back, and also real spiders, but he has not confirmed this.

The Mach 6 succeeds the Mach 5 for the rest of the series, and more of the original gadgets will be gradually revealed (such as the sludge slick) and used in future episodes.

Episodes & DVDs Main article: List of Speed Racer: The Next Generation episodes References

AWN Headline News

External links Official Speed Racer site Speed Racer: The Next Generation on IMDb Please use a more specific TV.com template. See the documentation for available templates. Speed Racer Deals Cross Finish Line NYCC 08: Speed Racer's Next Generation Revealed TV Guide's Speed Racer: The Next Generation episodes Template:Nicktoons

vte Speed Racer by Tatsuo Yoshida Franchise MangaAnimeThe New AdventuresXThe Next Generation episodescharactersFilm soundtrackRace to the Future Video games The Challenge of Racer XMy Most Dangerous AdventuresSpeed Racer (1995)Speed Racer (1996)Speed Racer (2008) Miscellaneous Mach FiveRacer XLego Speed Racer Categories: Speed RacerAmerican animated television seriesAnime-influenced animation2008 television series debutsTelevision series by Lionsgate Television Navigation menu Not logged in Talk Contributions Create account Log in ArticleTalk ReadView sourceView historySearch Search Wikipedia Main page Contents Current events Random article About Wikipedia Contact us Donate Contribute Help Learn to edit Community portal Recent changes Upload file Tools What links here Related changes Special pages Permanent link Page information Cite this page Wikidata item Print/export Download as PDF Printable version

Languages Español עברית Magyar Português Русский ไทย Edit links This page was last edited on 9 August 2009, at 22:55 (UTC). This version of the page has been revised. Besides normal editing, the reason for revision may have been that this version contains factual inaccuracies, vandalism, or material not compatible with the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License. Privacy policyAbout WikipediaDisclaimersContact WikipediaMobile viewDevelopersStatisticsCookie statementEnable previews Wikimedia FoundationPowered by MediaWiki Rugrats and Speed Racer: The Next Generation: Difference between pages From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (Difference between pages) Jump to navigationJump to search Revision as of 04:34, 19 November 2009 (view source) BoogerD (talk | contribs)

Revision as of 17:21, 10 October 2009 (edit) 201.42.18.230 (talk)

Line 1: Line 1: − Template:Dablink

Template:For

{{Infobox Television

{{Infobox Television − | show_name = Rugrats +

| show_name = Speed Racer: The Next Generation
	+	
| image = 

− | image = 250px

	+	
| creator = Larry Schwarz
(based on the original series created by Tatsuo Yoshida)

− | caption = "Rugrats" Title card

	+	
| format = Animated sitcom science-fiction

− | show_name_2 =

	+	
| starring = Kurt Csolak
Sahra Mellesse
Carter Jackson
Peter Fernandez
Michael Sinterniklaas
Robbie Sublett
David Zen Mansley

− | genre = Animation / Comedy / Family / Fantasy

	+	
| producer = Larry Schwarz
Ken Katsumoto
James Rocknowski
John Rocknowski
Sergei Aniskov
Sean Lahey
Christopher Fauci
Michael Gold
Doug MacLennon

− | format = Animated TV series

	+	
| writer = Ben Gruber
Allan Neuwirth
Marv Wolfman
Susan Kim
Justin Gray
Jimmy Palmiotti
Aaron Bergeron
Daniel Schofield
Mike Yank
Walt Gardner
James Harvey

− | creator = Arlene Klasky
Gabor Csupo
Paul Germain

	+	
| director = Stephen Moverley
John Holt

− | writer = Joe Ansolabehere
Craig Bartlett
Kate Boutilier
Michael Ferris
Peter Gaffney
Paul Germain
Jonathan Greenberg
Rachel Lipman
Jeffrey Townsend
Steve Viksten
Tom Mason
Dan Danko
Jeff Wynne
Melody Fox

	+	
| opentheme = "Go Speed Racer Go!", rearranged by John Angier

− | director = Howard Baker
Rick Bugental
Jim Duffy
Steve Moore
Steve Socki
Dan Thompson
Norton Virgien

	+	
| endtheme = "Go Speed Racer Go!" (w/o vocals)

− | creative_director = Paul Germain

	+	
| composer = John Angier

− | starring =

	+	
| country = Template:USA

− | voices = E.G. Daily
Christine Cavanaugh
Nancy Cartwright
Kath Soucie
Cheryl Chase
Tara Strong
Cree Summer
Dionne Quan
Melanie Chartoff
Jack Riley
Michael Bell
Tress MacNeille
David Doyle
Philip Proctor
Joe Alaskey
Julia Kato

	+	
| num_seasons = 1

− | narrated =

	+	
| num_episodes = 26

− | theme_music_composer = Mark Mothersbaugh

	+	
| list_episodes = List of Speed Racer: The Next Generation episodes

− | opentheme = The Rugrats Theme

	+	
| status = Currently Airing

− | endtheme = The Rugrats Theme (Speed Up and Remixed)

	+	
| runtime = 30 minutes (approx.)

− | composer = Mark Mothersbaugh
Bob Mothersbaugh
Denis Hannigan
Rusty Andrews

− | country = United States +

| developer = Nickelodeon Studios
	+	
| network = Nickelodeon (2008)
Nicktoons Network (2008-present)
(Other Network)
Template:FlagiconCartoon Network (Pakistan)
Template:FlagiconTemplate:FlagiconTemplate:FlagiconTemplate:FlagiconTemplate:FlagiconTemplate:Flagicon Nickelodeon Latin America

− | language = English

	+	
| executive_producer= Larry Schwarz
James Rocknowski
John Rocknowski

− | num_seasons = 12 seasons

	+	
| preceded_by = Speed Racer
Speed Racer X

− | num_episodes = 172 episodes

	+	
| related = Three Delivery
(2008-present)
Kappa Mikey
(2006-2008)

− | list_episodes = List of Rugrats episodes

	+	
| first_aired = May 2, 2008 

− | executive_producer = Vanessa Coffey
Gabor Csupo
Arlene Klasky

	+	
| last_aired = Present

− | producer = Cella Nichols Harris
Geraldine Clarke
David Blum
Paul Germain
Kate Boutilier

	+	
| website = http://www.lionsgate.com/speedracer/

− | editor = Karl Garabedian

	+	
}}

− | location = Universal Studios Florida

	+	

Speed Racer: The Next Generation is an American animated television series based on the classic Japanese Speed Racer franchise, in which the internal events take place decades after those in the 1967 Japanese series. It is the fourth television adaptation of the franchise, and is executive produced by Lions Gate Entertainment, Larry Schwarz, and Ken Katsumoto. It is the first Nicktoon not to be based on an original property, a pattern that Nicktoons appears to be adapting with Wolverine and the X-Men and Iron Man: Armored Adventures. Animation Collective produced the series, while the Flash character animation was handled by the now-defunct Collideascope Studios as their very last project. The last episode features the voice of NASCAR racer Jeff Gordon, who plays Turbo McCalister. − | cinematography = Animation

− | camera = Single-camera

− | runtime = 30 min

− | company = Klasky Csupo

− | distributor = Paramount Home Entertainment

− | channel = Nickelodeon

− | picture_format = NTSC

− | audio_format = Surround

− | first_aired = August 11, 1991

− | last_aired = May 29, 1994, & December 6, 1996 - June 8, 2004

− | status =

− | preceded_by =

− | followed_by = All Grown Up!
(2003-2008)

− | related =

− | website = http://www.cooltoons2.com/rugrats/

− | production_website = http://www.nick.com/shows/rugrats

− }}

− − Rugrats is an American animated television series created by Arlene Klasky, Gábor Csupó, and Paul Germain for Nickelodeon. The series premiered on Sunday August 11, 1991 and aired its last episode on Tuesday June 8, 2004.

− The show centers around four babies and their day-to-day lives, usually involving common life experiences that become adventures in the babies' imaginations. It was one of the first three Nicktoons and also aired on Nick Jr. in 1996.

− −

Premise[]

− The show originally revolved around a group of toddlers, Thomas "Tommy" Pickles (whose family moved from Akron, Ohio to their current location in California[7]), Charles "Chuckie" Finster, and the twins Phillip "Phil" and Lillian "Lil" DeVille. The toddlers are able to communicate with each other through baby speak, although viewers can understand them, because it is 'translated'. Often, they mispronounce words or use poor grammar and their speaking is full of malapropisms. An example of this is using the word "poopetrator" instead of "perpetrator." The group is often reluctantly joined by Tommy's cousin, Angelica Pickles. At age three years old, Angelica is able to communicate and understand language from both the toddlers and the adults, which she often uses as an advantage when she wants to manipulate either party. She is usually very mean to the babies. Susie Carmichael, who lives across the street from the Pickles, is also able to communicate on the same level as Angelica, though she isn't manipulative. As a result, Angelica and Susie often clash.[2]

− − In 1998, a new character was introduced. After The Rugrats Movie, in which Tommy's baby brother Dylan "Dil" Pickles is born, he was soon added as a character on the show. As a four month old baby, Dil is not able to communicate with anyone. Later in 2000, after Rugrats in Paris: The Movie was released, Kimi Finster was added as a character. She is Chuckie's stepsister.[2]

− −

Characters[]

Main article: List of Rugrats characters

File:Rugrats.JPG

The main babies. Clockwise from top: Tommy, Chuckie, Angelica, Lil, Phil, Dil, Kimi, and Susie.Babies shaped like a heart because of Angelica sitting in the center.

− The Pickles are a mixed Jewish-Christian family. There are two episodes that reflect the Pickles' Jewish heritage, one episode deals with the Passover holiday and the other with Hanukkah (in addition to episodes about Christmas, Easter, Kwanzaa, etc.). These episodes have been praised by Jewish groups and are re-run every year on Nick at the appropriate holiday times and can also be purchased on VHS or DVD.

− −

Production[]

− Rugrats was Nickelodeon's second Nicktoon. The series was in production from 1991 to 1994, and again from 1996 to 2004. It aired in Nickelodeon's Snick block from 1997-2000. It is the longest lasting Nicktoon to date, at over fourteen years longevity. The Rugrats received a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame in a ceremony on June 28, 2001.

− − The show airs in the UK on CBBC, CITV, Nicktoons, Nickelodeon UK and Nicktoonsters as well as in Canada on YTV. In Australia, it can be seen on Nickelodeon Australia (and, for a period, ABC Television).

− − On August 11, 2001, Rugrats celebrated its 10 year anniversary. The special/TV movie, "Rugrats: All Growed Up" was produced for the occasion. After the show, a special retrospective lookback aired, entitled Rugrats: Still Babies After All These Years. It was narrated by Amanda Bynes.

− − The show ended in 2004 then afterwards, two fairy tale themed direct-to-video films based on the original series under the title, "Rugrats: Tales from the Crib" were planned and then released separately in 2005 and in 2006.

− −

Theatrical films[]

− In 1998, the first Rugrats film was released, entitled The Rugrats Movie, which introduced baby Dil, Tommy's little brother, onto the show. In 2000 the second movie, Rugrats in Paris, was released, with two new characters introduced, Kimi and Kira. Kimi would become Chuckie's sister and Kira would become his new mother, after marrying his father. In 2003, the third movie, Rugrats Go Wild, was released. It was a crossover between the Rugrats and The Wild Thornberrys.

− −

Reception[]

− In a 1995 interview Steven Spielberg referred to Rugrats as one of several shows that are the best children's programming at the time. Spielberg described Rugrats as "sort of a TV Peanuts of our time."[8] It was named the 92nd best animated series by IGN.[4]

− −

Episodes[]

Main article: List of Rugrats episodes

− −

Other projects[]

Main article: All Grown Up!

Main article: Angelica and Susie's Pre-School Daze

− −

DVD Release[]

− −

Nick DVD name Release date Discs Episodes

Season 1 (1991-92) June 2, 2009 3 13

Season 2 (1992-93) June 2, 2009 3 13

− − Nickelodeon and Amazon.com have struck a deal to produce DVDs of new and old Nickelodeon shows, through the CreateSpace service. Using a concept similar to print on demand, Amazon will be making the discs, cover art, and disc art itself. The first and second seasons of Rugrats are on sale.[9]

− −

Broadcast history[]

  • Template:Flagicon USA

    • Nickelodeon (1991-2007)

    • Nicktoons Network (2002-present)

− −

  • Template:Flagicon Canada

    • Nickelodeon (2009-present)

    • YTV

− −

  • Template:Flagicon UK

    • Children's BBC (Including Live & Kicking and Smile) (1993-2004)

    • Nickelodeon (1994-2009)

    • Nicktoons (2002-2008, September 2009-present)

    • CITV (2005-2006)

    • Nicktoonsters (August 2008-July 2009)

− −

  • Template:Flagicon Argentina

    • The Big Channel

    • Magic Kids

    • Nickelodeon

    • Canal 9


	+	

This series was partly made to promote the live-action film, and the pilot movie premiered on Nicktoons Network on May 2, a week before the feature film adaptation was released in theatres.[10] However, both projects were produced independently from one another and featured different generations of "Speed Racers" (with the film featuring the original generation), though both featured a Mach 6. −

  • Template:Flagicon Australia

    • Nickelodeon Australia (1995-present)

    • ABC Television

    • Network Ten


	+	

Premise[]

  • Template:Flagicon New Zealand

    • Nickelodeon NZ (199?-present)

    • TV3 (199?-present)


	+	

Prior to the events of the series, the original Speed Racer has disappeared for unknown reasons, but the main characters know that he is alive. Only one of the original characters, Spritle, has a major role in this show. Speed Racer is seen briefly at the end of The Note and more recently in Plot for Teacher. The rest of the original cast are unseen, and their whereabouts are currently unknown. −

  • Template:Flagicon Philippines

    • TV5

    • Nickelodeon South East Asia

    • Studio 23


	+	

The series follows the adventures of an orphan teenager named Speed who dreams of being a famed car racer like the one he is named after. He takes a bus to the elite Racing Academy, founded by the Racer family, and soon experiences the difficulties of fitting in and competing with X, the best racer/student in the school, and Speed Racer's son. Spritle himself is now the headmaster. −

  • Template:Flagicon Ireland

    • RTÉ Two (199?-present)


	+	

In the pilot movie, Speed discovers that he is the other son of Speed Racer, meaning that X is his brother. Through the rest of the series, Speed and his new allies set out on a quest to get through the courses, discover the mystery of Speed Racer's disappearance, and try and build the Mach 6, a car that captures the spirit and gadgets of the Mach 5 for new generations, and the first car to contain a gasless engine. −

  • Template:Flagicon Malaysia

    • Nickelodeon South East Asia

    • TV3 (1992-1994)

    • MetroVision (1996-1998)

    • NTV7 (2001-2004)


	+	

The most pivotal plot device is the virtual track, a race track that transports racers to virtual racing environments known as the Virtual World. School faculty have the ability to add as many of their own obstacles as they wish, complying to school safety regulations. Whenever a racer is defeated in the track, they automatically get dispensed back onto the real one, unharmed. However, like all programs, the virtual track can be infested with viruses and/or hacked, causing anyone trapped in the Virtual World to be affected. −

  • Template:Flagicon Netherlands

    • Nickelodeon


	+	

Characters[]

  • Template:Flagicon Ukraine
	+	
Main article: List of Speed Racer: The Next Generation Characters

    • ICTV (Ukraine)


	+	

Mach Five and Mach Six[]

  • Template:Flagicon Italy

    • Italia 1


	+	

The second episode features the rebuilt Mach 5 designed as it appeared in the original anime, only animated in CGI, like all of the other cars in the show's racing sequences. Minor changes have occurred in the Mach Five in this series. Although the function for the homing robot is present, it is redesigned to resemble more of a metal peacock than a sleek, futuristic robot dove. The Deflector is used as the roof of the Mach Five. Also revealed in this show is an ejector's seat underneath the driver's seat in case of emergencies. A parachute was made, but was forgotten to be installed at the time. −

  • Template:Flagicon Mexico'

    • Nickelodeon Latin America 1996 - 2006

    • XHGC-TV Canal 5 (1997 - 2001), repeats episodes sometimes.


	+	

Its return is brief, as Zile Zazic destroys it successfully- the original makes a cameo in Plot for Teacher. However, plans for a new car are discovered and soon the protagonists rebuild the Mach Five to form the Mach 6. The Mach 6's engine is not designed to run on gas, which is a crucial story point, even though gas is still used for it through most of the series. It has all the features of the Mach Five, but redesigned or changed in some form or another. For example, the rotary saws are kept, but they're turned into laser saws. Also, the car has become more of a silver color with a fan in front and also includes two functional jets in the back where the fans were, and are used to get out of situations like a tornado ( as seen in the episode 'The Dance') or to help with acceleration. The new car features a transparent, holographic screen (better known as the 'comp') over the dashboard that the driver can use to interact live with his crew, and with other racers. Apparently, Speed mentions it can dispense rubber spiders out the back, and also real spiders, but he has not confirmed this. −

Awards[]

− −

Year

Association

Award Category

Result

1993

Daytime Emmy Award

Outstanding Animated Children's Program

Won

1995

Annie Award

Best Individual Achievement for Writing in the Field of Animation

Nominated

1996

Kids' Choice Awards

Favorite Cartoon

Won

1997

Emmy Award

Outstanding Children's Program

Nominated

Kids' Choice Awards

Favorite Cartoon

Won

1998

Kids' Choice Awards

Favorite Cartoon

Won

1999

Emmy Award

Outstanding Children's Program

Nominated

Genesis Award

Television - Children's Programming

Won

Kids' Choice Awards

Favorite Cartoon

Won

World Animation Celebration

Best Director of Animation for a Daytime Series

Won

2000

Artios Award

Best Casting for Animated Voice Over - Television

Nominated

Emmy Award

Outstanding Children's Program

Nominated

2001

Artios Award

Best Casting for Animated Voice Over - Television

Nominated

Emmy Award

Outstanding Children's Program

Nominated

2002

Artios Award

Best Casting for Animated Voice Over - Television

Nominated

Emmy Award

Outstanding Children's Program

Nominated

2003

Artios Award

Best Casting for Animated Voice Over - Television

Nominated

Daytime Emmy Award

Outstanding Animated Children's Program

Won

2004

Daytime Emmy Award

Outstanding Animated Children's Program

Nominated


	+	

The Mach 6 succeeds the Mach 5 for the rest of the series, and more of the original gadgets will be gradually revealed (such as the sludge slick) and used in future episodes. −

Video games[]

  • Rugrats: Search for Reptar (PlayStation)

  • Rugrats: Studio Tour (PlayStation)

  • Rugrats: Scavenger Hunt (Nintendo 64)

  • Rugrats in Paris - The Movie (Nintendo 64, Game Boy Advance, PC CD Rom, PlayStation)

  • Rugrats: Totally Angelica (PlayStation, Game Boy Advance)

  • Rugrats: Totally Angelica Boredom Busters (PC CD Rom)

  • Rugrats: Go Wild (PC CD Rom, Game Boy Advance)

  • Rugrats: All Growed Up - Older and Bolder (PC CD Rom)

  • Rugrats: Castle Capers (Game Boy Advance)

  • Rugrats: Royal Ransom (PlayStation 2, Nintendo GameCube)

  • Rugrats: I Gotta Go Party (Game Boy Advance)

  • Rugrats: The Movie (Game Boy Color)

  • Rugrats: Time Travelers (Game Boy Color)

  • Rugrats Activity Challenge (PC CD Rom)

  • Rugrats Adventure Game (PC CD Rom)

  • Rugrats Food Fight (Mobile Phone)

  • Rugrats Muchin Land (PC CD Rom)

  • The Rugrats Mystery Adventures (PC CD Rom)

  • Rocket Power: Team Rocket Rescue (PlayStation) (Tommy & Angelica appear as guest characters)

  • Nicktoons Racing (PlayStation, Game Boy Advance, Game Boy Color, Microsoft Windows, Arcade) (Tommy and Angelica playable)

  • Nicktoons: Attack of the Toybots (Wii, Nintendo DS, PlayStation 2, Game Boy Advance) (Tommy and Angelica are seen, but are not playable characters.)

  • Nicktoons: The Videogame (possibly)


See also[]

+

Episodes & DVDs[]

	+	
Main article: List of Speed Racer: The Next Generation episodes

Template:Portalpar

  • Klasky-Csupo


References[]

References[]

Line 280: Line 58:


External links[]

External links[]

	+	

Template:Wikiquote

  • Template:Imdb title

+

  • Template:Imdb title

  • Template:Tv.com show

+

  • Template:Tv.com
	+	

  • Rugrats at the Big Cartoon DataBase

+

	+	


Template:Rugrats

Template:SNICK/TEENick


Template:Nicktoons

Template:Nicktoons

	+	

Template:Speed Racer

− + − + − + − + − + −


	+	

es:Meteoro: La Nueva Generaciónda:Rollinger (filmserie)

	+	

pt:Speed Racer Nova Geraçãode:Rugrats

es:Rugrats

fr:Les Razmoket

it:Rugrats

he:ראגרטס

la:Rugrats

ms:Rugrats

nl:Ratjetoe (tekenfilmserie)

ja:ラグラッツ

pl:Pełzaki (serial animowany)

pt:Rugrats

ru:Ох уж эти детки (мультсериал)

simple:Rugrats

fi:Ipanat

sv:Rugrats

tl:Rugrats

tr:Rugrats

Revision as of 17:21, 10 October 2009 Speed Racer: The Next Generation Created by Larry Schwarz (based on the original series created by Tatsuo Yoshida) Developed by Nickelodeon Studios Written by Ben Gruber Allan Neuwirth Marv Wolfman Susan Kim Justin Gray Jimmy Palmiotti Aaron Bergeron Daniel Schofield Mike Yank Walt Gardner James Harvey Directed by Stephen Moverley John Holt Starring Kurt Csolak Sahra Mellesse Carter Jackson Peter Fernandez Michael Sinterniklaas Robbie Sublett David Zen Mansley Opening theme "Go Speed Racer Go!", rearranged by John Angier Ending theme "Go Speed Racer Go!" (w/o vocals) Composer John Angier Country of origin United States No. of seasons 1 No. of episodes 26 (list of episodes) Production Executive producers Larry Schwarz James Rocknowski John Rocknowski Producers Larry Schwarz Ken Katsumoto James Rocknowski John Rocknowski Sergei Aniskov Sean Lahey Christopher Fauci Michael Gold Doug MacLennon Running time 30 minutes (approx.) Release Original network Nickelodeon (2008) Nicktoons Network (2008-present) (Other Network) PakistanCartoon Network (Pakistan) BrazilMexicoPanamaArgentinaChileVenezuela Nickelodeon Latin America Original release May 2, 2008 – Present Chronology Preceded by Speed Racer Speed Racer X Related shows Three Delivery (2008-present) Kappa Mikey (2006-2008) External links Website Speed Racer: The Next Generation is an American animated television series based on the classic Japanese Speed Racer franchise, in which the internal events take place decades after those in the 1967 Japanese series. It is the fourth television adaptation of the franchise, and is executive produced by Lions Gate Entertainment, Larry Schwarz, and Ken Katsumoto. It is the first Nicktoon not to be based on an original property, a pattern that Nicktoons appears to be adapting with Wolverine and the X-Men and Iron Man: Armored Adventures. Animation Collective produced the series, while the Flash character animation was handled by the now-defunct Collideascope Studios as their very last project. The last episode features the voice of NASCAR racer Jeff Gordon, who plays Turbo McCalister.

This series was partly made to promote the live-action film, and the pilot movie premiered on Nicktoons Network on May 2, a week before the feature film adaptation was released in theatres.[1] However, both projects were produced independently from one another and featured different generations of "Speed Racers" (with the film featuring the original generation), though both featured a Mach 6.


Contents 1 Premise 2 Characters 3 Mach Five and Mach Six 4 Episodes & DVDs 5 References 6 External links Premise Prior to the events of the series, the original Speed Racer has disappeared for unknown reasons, but the main characters know that he is alive. Only one of the original characters, Spritle, has a major role in this show. Speed Racer is seen briefly at the end of The Note and more recently in Plot for Teacher. The rest of the original cast are unseen, and their whereabouts are currently unknown.

The series follows the adventures of an orphan teenager named Speed who dreams of being a famed car racer like the one he is named after. He takes a bus to the elite Racing Academy, founded by the Racer family, and soon experiences the difficulties of fitting in and competing with X, the best racer/student in the school, and Speed Racer's son. Spritle himself is now the headmaster.

In the pilot movie, Speed discovers that he is the other son of Speed Racer, meaning that X is his brother. Through the rest of the series, Speed and his new allies set out on a quest to get through the courses, discover the mystery of Speed Racer's disappearance, and try and build the Mach 6, a car that captures the spirit and gadgets of the Mach 5 for new generations, and the first car to contain a gasless engine.

The most pivotal plot device is the virtual track, a race track that transports racers to virtual racing environments known as the Virtual World. School faculty have the ability to add as many of their own obstacles as they wish, complying to school safety regulations. Whenever a racer is defeated in the track, they automatically get dispensed back onto the real one, unharmed. However, like all programs, the virtual track can be infested with viruses and/or hacked, causing anyone trapped in the Virtual World to be affected.

Characters Main article: List of Speed Racer: The Next Generation Characters Mach Five and Mach Six The second episode features the rebuilt Mach 5 designed as it appeared in the original anime, only animated in CGI, like all of the other cars in the show's racing sequences. Minor changes have occurred in the Mach Five in this series. Although the function for the homing robot is present, it is redesigned to resemble more of a metal peacock than a sleek, futuristic robot dove. The Deflector is used as the roof of the Mach Five. Also revealed in this show is an ejector's seat underneath the driver's seat in case of emergencies. A parachute was made, but was forgotten to be installed at the time.

Its return is brief, as Zile Zazic destroys it successfully- the original makes a cameo in Plot for Teacher. However, plans for a new car are discovered and soon the protagonists rebuild the Mach Five to form the Mach 6. The Mach 6's engine is not designed to run on gas, which is a crucial story point, even though gas is still used for it through most of the series. It has all the features of the Mach Five, but redesigned or changed in some form or another. For example, the rotary saws are kept, but they're turned into laser saws. Also, the car has become more of a silver color with a fan in front and also includes two functional jets in the back where the fans were, and are used to get out of situations like a tornado ( as seen in the episode 'The Dance') or to help with acceleration. The new car features a transparent, holographic screen (better known as the 'comp') over the dashboard that the driver can use to interact live with his crew, and with other racers. Apparently, Speed mentions it can dispense rubber spiders out the back, and also real spiders, but he has not confirmed this.

The Mach 6 succeeds the Mach 5 for the rest of the series, and more of the original gadgets will be gradually revealed (such as the sludge slick) and used in future episodes.

Episodes & DVDs Main article: List of Speed Racer: The Next Generation episodes References

AWN Headline News

External links Official Speed Racer site Speed Racer: The Next Generation on IMDb Please use a more specific TV.com template. See the documentation for available templates. Speed Racer Deals Cross Finish Line NYCC 08: Speed Racer's Next Generation Revealed TV Guide's Speed Racer: The Next Generation episodes Template:Nicktoons

vte Speed Racer by Tatsuo Yoshida Franchise MangaAnimeThe New AdventuresXThe Next Generation episodescharactersFilm soundtrackRace to the Future Video games The Challenge of Racer XMy Most Dangerous AdventuresSpeed Racer (1995)Speed Racer (1996)Speed Racer (2008) Miscellaneous Mach FiveRacer XLego Speed Racer Categories: Speed RacerAmerican animated television seriesAnime-influenced animation2008 television series debutsTelevision series by Lionsgate Television Navigation menu Not logged in Talk Contributions Create account Log in ArticleTalk ReadView sourceView historySearch Search Wikipedia Main page Contents Current events Random article About Wikipedia Contact us Donate Contribute Help Learn to edit Community portal Recent changes Upload file Tools What links here Related changes Special pages Permanent link Page information Cite this page Wikidata item Print/export Download as PDF Printable version

Languages Español עברית Magyar Português Русский ไทย Edit links This page was last edited on 10 October 2009, at 17:21 (UTC). This version of the page has been revised. Besides normal editing, the reason for revision may have been that this version contains factual inaccuracies, vandalism, or material not compatible with the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License. Privacy policyAbout WikipediaDisclaimersContact WikipediaMobile viewDevelopersStatisticsCookie statementEnable previews Wikimedia FoundationPowered by MediaWiki Rugrats and Speed Racer: The Next Generation: Difference between pages From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (Difference between pages) Jump to navigationJump to search Revision as of 18:28, 15 February 2010 (view source) Rjwilmsi (talk | contribs) m (cite web cleanup using AWB)

Revision as of 15:44, 18 January 2010 (edit) Franko1212 (talk | contribs) m

Line 1: Line 1:

	+	

{{Infobox Television − Template:Dablink

	+	
| show_name = Speed Racer: The Next Generation

Template:For

	+	
| image = 
	+	
| creator = Larry Schwarz
(based on the original series created by Tatsuo Yoshida) + | format = Animated sitcom science-fiction + | starring = Kurt Csolak
Sahra Mellesse
Carter Jackson
Peter Fernandez
Michael Sinterniklaas
Robbie Sublett
David Zen Mansley + | producer = Larry Schwarz
Ken Katsumoto
James Rocknowski
John Rocknowski
Sergei Aniskov
Sean Lahey
Christopher Fauci
Michael Gold
Doug MacLennon + | writer = Ben Gruber
Allan Neuwirth
Marv Wolfman
Susan Kim
Justin Gray
Jimmy Palmiotti
Aaron Bergeron
Daniel Schofield
Mike Yank
Walt Gardner
James Harvey + | director = Stephen Moverley
John Holt + | opentheme = "Go Speed Racer Go!", rearranged by John Angier + | endtheme = "Go Speed Racer Go!" (w/o vocals) + | composer = John Angier + | country = Template:USA + | num_seasons = 1 + | num_episodes = 26 + | list_episodes = List of Speed Racer: The Next Generation episodes + | status = Ended + | runtime = 30 minutes (approx.) + | developer = Nickelodeon Studios + | network = Nickelodeon (2008)
Nicktoons Network (2008-present)
(Other Network)
Template:FlagiconCartoon Network (Pakistan)
Template:FlagiconTemplate:FlagiconTemplate:FlagiconTemplate:FlagiconTemplate:FlagiconTemplate:Flagicon Nickelodeon Latin America + | executive_producer= Larry Schwarz
James Rocknowski
John Rocknowski + | preceded_by = Speed Racer
Speed Racer X + | related = Three Delivery
(2008-2009)
Kappa Mikey
(2006-2008) + | first_aired = May 2, 2008 + | last_aired = July 5, 2009 + | website = http://www.lionsgate.com/speedracer/ + }} +

Speed Racer: The Next Generation is an American animated television series based on the classic Japanese Speed Racer franchise, in which the internal events take place decades after those in the 1967 Japanese series. It is the fourth television adaptation of the franchise, and is executive produced by Lions Gate Entertainment, Larry Schwarz, and Ken Katsumoto. It is the first Nicktoon not to be based on an original property, a pattern that Nicktoons appears to be adapting with Wolverine and the X-Men and Iron Man: Armored Adventures. Animation Collective produced the series, while the Flash character animation was handled by the now-defunct Collideascope Studios as their very last project. The last episode features the voice of NASCAR racer Jeff Gordon, who plays Turbo McCalister.

	+	

This series was partly made to promote the live-action film, and the pilot movie premiered on Nicktoons Network on May 2, a week before the feature film adaptation was released in theatres.[11] However, both projects were produced independently from one another and featured different generations of "Speed Racers" (with the film featuring the original generation), though both featured a Mach 6. − {{Infobox television

− | show_name = Rugrats

− | image = File:Rugrats-logo.jpg

− | caption = Title card

− | show_name_2 =

− | genre = Animation / Comedy / Family / Fantasy

− | format = Animated TV series

− | creator = Arlene Klasky
Gabor Csupo
Paul Germain

− | writer = Joe Ansolabehere
Craig Bartlett
Kate Boutilier
Michael Ferris
Peter Gaffney
Paul Germain
Jonathan Greenberg
Rachel Lipman
Jeffrey Townsend
Steve Viksten
Tom Mason
Dan Danko
Jeff Wynne
Melody Fox

− | director = Howard Baker
Rick Bugental
Jim Duffy
Steve Moore
Steve Socki
Dan Thompson
Norton Virgien
Dave Fontana
Tony Vian
Louie del Carmen
Chris Hermans
Anthony Bell
Bob Fuentes III
Carol Millican

− | creative_director = Paul Germain

− | starring =

− | voices = E.G. Daily
Christine Cavanaugh
Nancy Cartwright
Kath Soucie
Cheryl Chase
Tara Strong
Cree Summer
Dionne Quan
Melanie Chartoff
Jack Riley
Michael Bell
Tress MacNeille
David Doyle
Philip Proctor
Joe Alaskey
Julia Kato

− | narrated =

− | theme_music_composer = Mark Mothersbaugh

− | opentheme = The Rugrats Theme

− | endtheme = The Rugrats Theme (Speed Up and Remixed)

− | composer = Mark Mothersbaugh
Bob Mothersbaugh
Denis Hannigan
Rusty Andrews

− | voice director = Charlie Adler

− | country = United States

− | language = English

− | num_seasons = 9 seasons

− | num_episodes = 351 episodes

− | list_episodes = List of Rugrats episodes

− | executive_producer = Vanessa Coffey
Gabor Csupo
Arlene Klasky

− | producer = Cella Nichols Harris
Geraldine Clarke
David Blum
Paul Germain
Kate Boutilier

− | editor = Karl Garabedian
John Bryant

− | location = Universal Studios Florida

− | cinematography = Animation

− | camera = Single-camera

− | runtime = 22-24 minutes

− | company = Klasky Csupo

− | distributor = Paramount Home Entertainment

− | channel = Nickelodeon

− | picture_format = NTSC

− | audio_format = Surround

− | first_aired = Template:Start date

− | last_aired = Template:End date

− | status = Ended

− | preceded_by =

− | followed_by = All Grown Up!
(2003-2008)

− | related = Angelica and Susie's Pre-School Daze
(2005-2008)

− | website = http://www.cooltoons2.com/rugrats/

− | production_website = http://www.nick.com/shows/rugrats

− }}

− − Rugrats is an American animated television series created by Arlene Klasky, Gábor Csupó, and Paul Germain for Nickelodeon. The series premiered on Sunday August 11, 1991 and aired its last episode on Tuesday June 8, 2004.

− The show focuses on four babies and their day-to-day lives, usually involving common life experiences that become adventures in the babies' imaginations. It was one of the first three Nicktoons and also aired on Nick Jr. in 1995.


Premise[]

Premise[]

− The show originally revolved around a group of children, including infant Thomas "Tommy" Pickles (whose family moved from Akron, Ohio to their current location in California[12]), toddler Charles "Chuckie" Finster, and the twin-infants Phillip "Phil" and Lillian "Lil" DeVille. The toddlers are able to communicate with each other through baby speak, although viewers can understand them, because it is 'translated'. Often, they mispronounce words or use poor grammar and their speaking is full of malapropisms. An example of this is using the word "poopetrator" instead of "perpetrator." The group is often reluctantly joined by Tommy's cousin, Angelica Pickles. At age three years old, Angelica is able to communicate and understand language from both the toddlers and the adults, which she often uses as an advantage when she wants to manipulate either party. She is usually very mean to the babies. Susie Carmichael, who lives across the street from the Pickles, is also able to communicate on the same level as Angelica, though she isn't manipulative. As a result, Angelica and Susie often clash.[2]


	+	

Prior to the events of the series, the original Speed Racer has disappeared for unknown reasons, but the main characters know that he is alive. Only one of the original characters, Spritle, has a major role in this show. Speed Racer is seen briefly at the end of The Note and more recently in Plot for Teacher. The rest of the original cast are unseen, and their whereabouts are currently unknown. − In 1998, a new character was introduced. After The Rugrats Movie, in which Tommy's baby brother Dylan "Dil" Pickles is born, he was soon added as a character on the show. As a four month old baby, Dil is not able to communicate with anyone. Later in 2000, after Rugrats in Paris: The Movie was released, Kimi Finster was added as a character. She is Chuckie's stepsister.[2]


	+	

The series follows the adventures of an orphan teenager named Speed who dreams of being a famed car racer like the one he is named after. He takes a bus to the elite Racing Academy, founded by the Racer family, and soon experiences the difficulties of fitting in and competing with X, the best racer/student in the school, and Speed Racer's son. Spritle himself is now the headmaster. −

Characters[]

Main article: List of Rugrats characters

File:Rugrats.JPG

The main babies. Clockwise from top: Tommy, Chuckie, Angelica, Lil, Phil, Dil, Kimi, and Susie.

− The Pickles are a mixed Jewish-Christian family. There are two episodes that reflect the Pickles' Jewish heritage, one episode deals with the Passover holiday and the other with Hanukkah (in addition to episodes about Christmas, Easter, Kwanzaa, etc.). These episodes have been praised by Jewish groups and are re-run every year on Nick at the appropriate holiday times and can also be purchased on VHS or DVD.


	+	

In the pilot movie, Speed discovers that he is the other son of Speed Racer, meaning that X is his brother. Through the rest of the series, Speed and his new allies set out on a quest to get through the courses, discover the mystery of Speed Racer's disappearance, and try and build the Mach 6, a car that captures the spirit and gadgets of the Mach 5 for new generations, and the first car to contain a gasless engine. −

Production[]

Rugrats was Nickelodeon's second Nicktoon. The series was in production from 1991 to 2004. It aired in Nickelodeon's Snick block from 1997-2000. It is the longest lasting Nicktoon to date, at over fourteen years longevity. The Rugrats received a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame in a ceremony on June 28, 2001.


	+	

The most pivotal plot device is the virtual track, a race track that transports racers to virtual racing environments known as the Virtual World. School faculty have the ability to add as many of their own obstacles as they wish, complying to school safety regulations. Whenever a racer is defeated in the track, they automatically get dispensed back onto the real one, unharmed. However, like all programs, the virtual track can be infested with viruses and/or hacked, causing anyone trapped in the Virtual World to be affected. − The show airs in the UK on CBBC, CITV, Nicktoons, Nickelodeon UK and Nicktoonsters as well as in Canada on YTV. In Australia, it can be seen on Nickelodeon Australia (and, for a period, ABC Television).


	+	

Characters[]

− On August 11, 2001, Rugrats celebrated its 10 year anniversary. The special/TV movie, Rugrats: All Growed Up was produced for the occasion. After the show, a special retrospective lookback aired, entitled Rugrats: Still Babies After All These Years. It was narrated by Amanda Bynes.

	+	
Main article: List of Speed Racer: The Next Generation Characters

− − The show ended in 2004. Two fairy-tale themed direct-to-video films based on the original series under the title, Rugrats: Tales from the Crib were planned and then released separately in 2005 and in 2006. On August 11, 2011 the Rugrats will be celebrating its 20 year anniversary to celebrate its 20th birthday.

− −

Theatrical films[]

− In 1998, the first Rugrats film was released, entitled The Rugrats Movie, which introduced baby Dil, Tommy's little brother, onto the show. In 2000 the second movie, Rugrats in Paris, was released, with two new characters introduced, Kimi and Kira. Kimi would become Chuckie's sister and Kira would become his new mother, after marrying his father. In 2003, the third movie, Rugrats Go Wild, was released. It was a crossover between the Rugrats and The Wild Thornberrys.

− −

Reception[]

− In a 1995 interview, Steven Spielberg referred to Rugrats as one of several shows that are the best children's programming at the time. Spielberg described Rugrats as "sort of a TV Peanuts of our time."[13] It was named the 92nd best animated series by IGN.[4]

− −

Episodes[]

Main article: List of Rugrats episodes

− −

Other projects[]

Main article: All Grown Up!

Main article: Angelica and Susie's Pre-School Daze

− −

DVD release[]

− −

Nick DVD name Release date Discs Episodes

Season 1 (1991–92) June 2, 2009 3 13

Season 2 (1992–93) June 2, 2009 3 13

− − Nickelodeon and Amazon.com have struck a deal to produce DVDs of new and old Nickelodeon shows, through the CreateSpace service. Using a concept similar to print on demand, Amazon will be making the discs, cover art, and disc art itself. The first and second seasons of Rugrats are on sale.[14]

− −

Broadcast history[]

  • Template:Flagicon USA

    • Nickelodeon (1991–2007)

    • Nicktoons Network (2002–present)

− −

  • Template:Flagicon Canada

    • Nickelodeon (2009–present)

    • YTV

− −

  • Template:Flagicon UK

    • Children's BBC (Including Live & Kicking and Smile) (1993–2004)

    • Nickelodeon (1994–2009)

    • Nicktoons (2002–2008, September 2009–present)

    • CITV (2005–2006)

    • Nicktoonsters (August 2008-July 2009)

− −

  • Template:Flagicon Turkey

    • CNBC-E

    • Nickelodeon Turkey

    • TRT

− −

  • Template:Flagicon Argentina

    • The Big Channel

    • Magic Kids

    • Nickelodeon

    • Canal 9

  • Template:Flagicon Australia

    • Nickelodeon Australia (1995–present)

    • ABC Television

    • Network Ten

− −

  • Template:Flagicon New Zealand

    • Nickelodeon NZ (199?-present)

    • TV2 (2003–present)

− −

  • Template:Flagicon Philippines

    • TV5

    • Nickelodeon South East Asia

    • Studio 23

− −

  • Template:Flagicon Ireland

    • RTÉ Two (199?-present)

− −

  • Template:Flagicon Malaysia

    • Nickelodeon South East Asia

    • TV3 (1992–1994)

    • MetroVision (1996–1998)

    • NTV7 (2001–2004)

− −

  • Template:Flagicon Netherlands

    • Nickelodeon

− −

  • Template:Flagicon Ukraine

    • ICTV (Ukraine)


	+	

Mach Five and Mach Six[]

  • Template:Flagicon Italy

    • Italia 1


	+	

The second episode features the rebuilt Mach 5 designed as it appeared in the original anime, only animated in CGI, like all of the other cars in the show's racing sequences. Minor changes have occurred in the Mach Five in this series. Although the function for the homing robot is present, it is redesigned to resemble more of a metal peacock than a sleek, futuristic robot dove. The Deflector is used as the roof of the Mach Five. Also revealed in this show is an ejector's seat underneath the driver's seat in case of emergencies. A parachute was made, but was forgotten to be installed at the time. −

  • Template:Flagicon Mexico

    • Nickelodeon Latin America 1996 - 2006

    • XHGC-TV Canal 5 (1997–2001), repeats episodes sometimes.


	+	

Its return is brief, as Zile Zazic destroys it successfully- the original makes a cameo in Plot for Teacher. However, plans for a new car are discovered and soon the protagonists rebuild the Mach Five to form the Mach 6. The Mach 6's engine is not designed to run on gas, which is a crucial story point, even though gas is still used for it through most of the series. It has all the features of the Mach Five, but redesigned or changed in some form or another. For example, the rotary saws are kept, but they're turned into laser saws. Also, the car has become more of a silver color with a fan in front and also includes two functional jets in the back where the fans were, and are used to get out of situations like a tornado ( as seen in the episode 'The Dance') or to help with acceleration. The new car features a transparent, holographic screen (better known as the 'comp') over the dashboard that the driver can use to interact live with his crew, and with other racers. Apparently, Speed mentions it can dispense rubber spiders out the back, and also real spiders, but he has not confirmed this. −

Awards[]

File:Rugrats on the Hollywood Walk of Fame.jpg

The Rugrats' star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame.

− −

Year

Association

Award Category

Result

1992

Daytime Emmy Award

Outstanding Animated Program

Won

1993

Daytime Emmy Award

Outstanding Animated Children's Program

Won

1994

CableAce

Animated Programming Special or Series

Nominated

Daytime Emmy Award

Outstanding Animated Children's Program

Won

1995

Annie Award

Best Individual Achievement for Writing in the Field of Animation

Nominated

Humanitas Prize

Children's Animation Category

Nominated

1996

Kids' Choice Awards

Favorite Cartoon

Won

1997

Emmy Award

Outstanding Children's Program

Nominated

Kids' Choice Awards

Favorite Cartoon

Won

1998

Kids' Choice Awards

Favorite Cartoon

Won

1999

Emmy Award

Outstanding Children's Program

Nominated

Genesis Award

Television - Children's Programming

Won

Kids' Choice Awards

Favorite Cartoon

Won

Humanitas Prize

Children's Animation Category

Won

Humanitas Prize

Children's Animation Category

Nominated

TV Guide Award

Favorite Children's Show

Nominated

World Animation Celebration

Best Director of Animation for a Daytime Series

Won

2000

Artios Award

Best Casting for Animated Voice Over - Television

Nominated

Kid's Choice Awards

Favorite Cartoon

Won

Emmy Award

Outstanding Children's Program

Nominated

TV Guide Award

Favorite Children's Show

Won

2001

Artios Award

Best Casting for Animated Voice Over - Television

Nominated

Emmy Award

Outstanding Children's Program

Nominated

Kids' Choice Awards

Favorite Cartoon

Won

Television Critics Association Awards

Outstanding Achievement in Children's Programming

Nominated

2002

Artios Award

Best Casting for Animated Voice Over - Television

Nominated

Emmy Award

Outstanding Children's Program

Nominated

Kid's Choice Awards

Favorite Cartoon

Won

2003

Artios Award

Best Casting for Animated Voice Over - Television

Nominated

Kid's Choice Awards

Favorite Cartoon

Won

Daytime Emmy Award

Outstanding Animated Children's Program

Won

2004

Daytime Emmy Award

Outstanding Animated Children's Program

Nominated


	+	

The Mach 6 succeeds the Mach 5 for the rest of the series, and more of the original gadgets will be gradually revealed (such as the sludge slick) and used in future episodes. −

Video games[]

  • Rugrats: Search for Reptar (PlayStation)

  • Rugrats: Studio Tour (PlayStation)

  • Rugrats: Scavenger Hunt (Nintendo 64)

  • Rugrats in Paris - The Movie (Nintendo 64, Game Boy Advance, PC CD Rom, PlayStation)

  • Rugrats: Totally Angelica (PlayStation, Game Boy Advance)

  • Rugrats: Totally Angelica Boredom Busters (PC CD Rom)

  • Rugrats: Go Wild (PC CD Rom, Game Boy Advance)

  • Rugrats: All Growed Up - Older and Bolder (PC CD Rom)

  • Rugrats: Castle Capers (Game Boy Advance)

  • Rugrats: Royal Ransom (PlayStation 2, Nintendo GameCube)

  • Rugrats: I Gotta Go Party (Game Boy Advance)

  • Rugrats: The Movie (Game Boy Color)

  • Rugrats: Time Travelers (Game Boy Color)

  • Rugrats Activity Challenge (PC CD Rom)

  • Rugrats Adventure Game (PC CD Rom)

  • Rugrats Food Fight (Mobile Phone)

  • Rugrats Muchin Land (PC CD Rom)

  • The Rugrats Mystery Adventures (PC CD Rom)

  • Rocket Power: Team Rocket Rescue (PlayStation) (Tommy & Angelica appear as guest characters)

  • Nicktoons Racing (PlayStation, Game Boy Advance, Game Boy Color, Microsoft Windows, Arcade) (Tommy and Angelica playable)

  • Nicktoons: Attack of the Toybots (Wii, Nintendo DS, PlayStation 2, Game Boy Advance) (Tommy and Angelica are seen, but are not playable characters.)

  • Nicktoons: The Videogame (possibly)


See also[]

+

Episodes & DVDs[]

	+	
Main article: List of Speed Racer: The Next Generation episodes

Template:Portalpar

  • Klasky-Csupo


References[]

+

References[]

  1. Template:Cite web
  2. 2.0 2.1 2.2 2.3 2.4 2.5 TV.com
  3. "Spielberg Toons in." TV Guide. October 28, 1995. 33.
  4. 4.0 4.1 4.2 Template:Cite web
  5. Template:Cite web
  6. AWN Headline News
  7. Template:Cite web
  8. "Spielberg Toons in." TV Guide. October 28, 1995. 33.
  9. Template:Cite web
  10. AWN Headline News
  11. AWN Headline News
  12. Template:Cite web
  13. "Spielberg Toons in." TV Guide. October 28, 1995. 33.
  14. Template:Cite web

External links[]

+

External links[]

	+	

Template:Wikiquote

  • Template:Imdb title

+

  • Template:Imdb title

  • Template:Tv.com show

+

  • Template:Tv.com
	+	

	+	

  • Template:Bcdb
	+	

Template:Rugrats

Template:SNICK/TEENick


Template:Nicktoons

Template:Nicktoons

	+	

Template:Speed Racer

− + − + − + − + − + − + −


	+	

es:Meteoro: la nueva generaciónda:Rollinger (filmserie)

	+	

pt:Speed Racer Nova Geraçãode:Rugrats

es:Rugrats

fr:Les Razmoket

it:Rugrats

he:ראגרטס

la:Rugrats

ms:Rugrats

nl:Ratjetoe (tekenfilmserie)

ja:ラグラッツ

pl:Pełzaki (serial animowany)

pt:Rugrats

ru:Ох, уж эти детки!

simple:Rugrats

fi:Ipanat

sv:Rugrats

tl:Rugrats

tr:Rugrats

Revision as of 15:44, 18 January 2010 Speed Racer: The Next Generation Created by Larry Schwarz (based on the original series created by Tatsuo Yoshida) Developed by Nickelodeon Studios Written by Ben Gruber Allan Neuwirth Marv Wolfman Susan Kim Justin Gray Jimmy Palmiotti Aaron Bergeron Daniel Schofield Mike Yank Walt Gardner James Harvey Directed by Stephen Moverley John Holt Starring Kurt Csolak Sahra Mellesse Carter Jackson Peter Fernandez Michael Sinterniklaas Robbie Sublett David Zen Mansley Opening theme "Go Speed Racer Go!", rearranged by John Angier Ending theme "Go Speed Racer Go!" (w/o vocals) Composer John Angier Country of origin United States No. of seasons 1 No. of episodes 26 (list of episodes) Production Executive producers Larry Schwarz James Rocknowski John Rocknowski Producers Larry Schwarz Ken Katsumoto James Rocknowski John Rocknowski Sergei Aniskov Sean Lahey Christopher Fauci Michael Gold Doug MacLennon Running time 30 minutes (approx.) Release Original network Nickelodeon (2008) Nicktoons Network (2008-present) (Other Network) PakistanCartoon Network (Pakistan) BrazilMexicoPanamaArgentinaChileVenezuela Nickelodeon Latin America Original release May 2, 2008 – July 5, 2009 Chronology Preceded by Speed Racer Speed Racer X Related shows Three Delivery (2008-2009) Kappa Mikey (2006-2008) External links Website Speed Racer: The Next Generation is an American animated television series based on the classic Japanese Speed Racer franchise, in which the internal events take place decades after those in the 1967 Japanese series. It is the fourth television adaptation of the franchise, and is executive produced by Lions Gate Entertainment, Larry Schwarz, and Ken Katsumoto. It is the first Nicktoon not to be based on an original property, a pattern that Nicktoons appears to be adapting with Wolverine and the X-Men and Iron Man: Armored Adventures. Animation Collective produced the series, while the Flash character animation was handled by the now-defunct Collideascope Studios as their very last project. The last episode features the voice of NASCAR racer Jeff Gordon, who plays Turbo McCalister.

This series was partly made to promote the live-action film, and the pilot movie premiered on Nicktoons Network on May 2, a week before the feature film adaptation was released in theatres.[1] However, both projects were produced independently from one another and featured different generations of "Speed Racers" (with the film featuring the original generation), though both featured a Mach 6.


Contents 1 Premise 2 Characters 3 Mach Five and Mach Six 4 Episodes & DVDs 5 References 6 External links Premise Prior to the events of the series, the original Speed Racer has disappeared for unknown reasons, but the main characters know that he is alive. Only one of the original characters, Spritle, has a major role in this show. Speed Racer is seen briefly at the end of The Note and more recently in Plot for Teacher. The rest of the original cast are unseen, and their whereabouts are currently unknown.

The series follows the adventures of an orphan teenager named Speed who dreams of being a famed car racer like the one he is named after. He takes a bus to the elite Racing Academy, founded by the Racer family, and soon experiences the difficulties of fitting in and competing with X, the best racer/student in the school, and Speed Racer's son. Spritle himself is now the headmaster.

In the pilot movie, Speed discovers that he is the other son of Speed Racer, meaning that X is his brother. Through the rest of the series, Speed and his new allies set out on a quest to get through the courses, discover the mystery of Speed Racer's disappearance, and try and build the Mach 6, a car that captures the spirit and gadgets of the Mach 5 for new generations, and the first car to contain a gasless engine.

The most pivotal plot device is the virtual track, a race track that transports racers to virtual racing environments known as the Virtual World. School faculty have the ability to add as many of their own obstacles as they wish, complying to school safety regulations. Whenever a racer is defeated in the track, they automatically get dispensed back onto the real one, unharmed. However, like all programs, the virtual track can be infested with viruses and/or hacked, causing anyone trapped in the Virtual World to be affected.

Characters Main article: List of Speed Racer: The Next Generation Characters Mach Five and Mach Six The second episode features the rebuilt Mach 5 designed as it appeared in the original anime, only animated in CGI, like all of the other cars in the show's racing sequences. Minor changes have occurred in the Mach Five in this series. Although the function for the homing robot is present, it is redesigned to resemble more of a metal peacock than a sleek, futuristic robot dove. The Deflector is used as the roof of the Mach Five. Also revealed in this show is an ejector's seat underneath the driver's seat in case of emergencies. A parachute was made, but was forgotten to be installed at the time.

Its return is brief, as Zile Zazic destroys it successfully- the original makes a cameo in Plot for Teacher. However, plans for a new car are discovered and soon the protagonists rebuild the Mach Five to form the Mach 6. The Mach 6's engine is not designed to run on gas, which is a crucial story point, even though gas is still used for it through most of the series. It has all the features of the Mach Five, but redesigned or changed in some form or another. For example, the rotary saws are kept, but they're turned into laser saws. Also, the car has become more of a silver color with a fan in front and also includes two functional jets in the back where the fans were, and are used to get out of situations like a tornado ( as seen in the episode 'The Dance') or to help with acceleration. The new car features a transparent, holographic screen (better known as the 'comp') over the dashboard that the driver can use to interact live with his crew, and with other racers. Apparently, Speed mentions it can dispense rubber spiders out the back, and also real spiders, but he has not confirmed this.

The Mach 6 succeeds the Mach 5 for the rest of the series, and more of the original gadgets will be gradually revealed (such as the sludge slick) and used in future episodes.

Episodes & DVDs Main article: List of Speed Racer: The Next Generation episodes References

AWN Headline News

External links Official Speed Racer site Speed Racer: The Next Generation on IMDb Please use a more specific TV.com template. See the documentation for available templates. Speed Racer Deals Cross Finish Line NYCC 08: Speed Racer's Next Generation Revealed TV Guide's Speed Racer: The Next Generation episodes Template:Nicktoons

vte Speed Racer by Tatsuo Yoshida Franchise MangaAnimeThe New AdventuresXThe Next Generation episodescharactersFilm soundtrackRace to the Future Video games The Challenge of Racer XMy Most Dangerous AdventuresSpeed Racer (1995)Speed Racer (1996)Speed Racer (2008) Miscellaneous Mach FiveRacer XLego Speed Racer Categories: Speed RacerAmerican animated television seriesAnime-influenced animation2008 American television series debuts2009 American television series endingsTelevision series by Lionsgate Television Navigation menu Not logged in Talk Contributions Create account Log in ArticleTalk ReadView sourceView historySearch Search Wikipedia Main page Contents Current events Random article About Wikipedia Contact us Donate Contribute Help Learn to edit Community portal Recent changes Upload file Tools What links here Related changes Special pages Permanent link Page information Cite this page Wikidata item Print/export Download as PDF Printable version

Languages Español עברית Magyar Português Русский ไทย Edit links This page was last edited on 18 January 2010, at 15:44 (UTC). This version of the page has been revised. Besides normal editing, the reason for revision may have been that this version contains factual inaccuracies, vandalism, or material not compatible with the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License. Privacy policyAbout WikipediaDisclaimersContact WikipediaMobile viewDevelopersStatisticsCookie statementEnable previews Wikimedia FoundationPowered by MediaWiki Rugrats and Speed Racer: The Next Generation: Difference between pages From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (Difference between pages) Jump to navigationJump to search Revision as of 04:30, 13 August 2010 (view source) Cqcpmbhafbjh (talk | contribs) (→‎Premise)

Revision as of 22:06, 18 August 2010 (edit) 71.59.50.222 (talk)

Line 1: Line 1:

	+	

{{Infobox Television − Template:Dablink

	+	
| show_name = Speed Racer: The Next Generation

Template:For

	+	
| image = 

− {{Infobox television

	+	
| creator = Larry Schwarz
(based on the original series created by Tatsuo Yoshida)

− | show_name = Rugrats

	+	
| format = Animated sitcom science-fiction

− | image = File:Rugrats-logo.jpg

	+	
| starring = Kurt Csolak
Sahra Mellesse
Carter Jackson
Peter Fernandez
Michael Sinterniklaas
Robbie Sublett
David Zen Mansley

− | caption = Title card

	+	
| producer = Larry Schwarz
Ken Katsumoto
James Rocknowski
John Rocknowski
Sergei Aniskov
Sean Lahey
Christopher Fauci
Michael Gold
Doug MacLennon

− | show_name_2 =

	+	
| writer = Ben Gruber
Allan Neuwirth
Marv Wolfman
Susan Kim
Justin Gray
Jimmy Palmiotti
Aaron Bergeron
Daniel Schofield
Mike Yank
Walt Gardner
James Harvey

− | genre = Animation, comedy, family, fantasy

	+	
| director = Stephen Moverley
John Holt

− | format = Animated TV series

	+	
| opentheme = "Go Speed Racer Go!", rearranged by John Angier

− | creator = Arlene Klasky
Gabor Csupo
Paul Germain

	+	
| endtheme = "Go Speed Racer Go!" (w/o vocals)

− | writer = Joe Ansolabehere
Craig Bartlett
Kate Boutilier
Michael Ferris
Peter Gaffney
Paul Germain
Jonathan Greenberg
Rachel Lipman
Jeffrey Townsend
Steve Viksten
Tom Mason
Dan Danko
Jeff Wynne
Melody Fox

	+	
| composer = John Angier

− | director = Howard Baker
Rick Bugental
Jim Duffy
Steve Moore
Steve Socki
Dan Thompson
Norton Virgien
Dave Fontana
Tony Vian
Louie del Carmen
Chris Hermans
Anthony Bell
Bob Fuentes III
Carol Millican

	+	
| country = United States

− | creative_director = Paul Germain

	+	
| num_seasons = 1

− | voices = E.G. Daily
Christine Cavanaugh
Nancy Cartwright
Kath Soucie
Cheryl Chase
Tara Strong
Cree Summer
Dionne Quan
Melanie Chartoff
Jack Riley
Michael Bell
Tress MacNeille
David Doyle
Philip Proctor
Joe Alaskey
Julia Kato

	+	
| num_episodes = 26

− | narrated =

	+	
| list_episodes = List of Speed Racer: The Next Generation episodes

− | theme_music_composer = Mark Mothersbaugh

	+	
| status = Will air back on Nicktoons,

− | opentheme = The Rugrats Theme

	+	
| runtime = 30 minutes (approx.)

− | endtheme = The Rugrats Theme (Speed Up and Remixed)

	+	
| developer = Nickelodeon Studios

− | composer = Mark Mothersbaugh
Bob Mothersbaugh
Denis Hannigan
Rusty Andrews

	+	
| company = Animation Collective
Lionsgate Television
Nickelodeon Animation Studios

− | voice director = Charlie Adler

	+	
| network = Nickelodeon (2008)
Nicktoons (2008-present)

− | country = United States

	+	
| executive_producer= Larry Schwarz
James Rocknowski
John Rocknowski

− | language = English

	+	
| preceded_by = Speed Racer
Speed Racer X

− | num_seasons = 9 seasons

	+	
| related = Three Delivery
Kappa Mikey

− | num_episodes = 173 episodes

	+	
| first_aired = Template:Start date

− | list_episodes = List of Rugrats episodes

	+	
| last_aired = present

− | executive_producer = Vanessa Coffey
Gabor Csupo
Arlene Klasky

	+	
| website = http://www.lionsgate.com/speedracer/

− | producer = Cella Nichols Harris
Geraldine Clarke
David Blum
Paul Germain
Kate Boutilier

	+	
}}

− | editor = Karl Garabedian
John Bryant

	+	

Speed Racer: The Next Generation is an American animated television series based on the classic Japanese Speed Racer franchise, in which the internal events take place decades after those in the 1967 Japanese series. It is the fourth television adaptation of the franchise, and is executive produced by Lions Gate Entertainment, Larry Schwarz, and Ken Katsumoto. It is the first Nicktoon not to be based on an original property.[1] Animation Collective produced the series, while the Flash character animation was handled by the now-defunct Collideascope Studios as their very last project.Template:Citation needed The last episode features the voice of NASCAR racer Jeff Gordon, who plays Turbo McCalister. − | location = Universal Studios Florida

− | cinematography = Animation

− | camera = Single-camera

− | runtime = 23-24 minutes

− | company = Klasky Csupo[2]

− | distributor = Paramount Home Entertainment

− | channel = Nickelodeon[3]

− | picture_format = NTSC

− | audio_format = Surround

− | first_aired = Template:Start date

− | last_aired = Template:End date

− | status = Ended

− | preceded_by =

− | followed_by = All Grown Up!
(2003-2008)

− | related = Angelica and Susie's Pre-School Daze
(2005-2008)

− | website = http://www.cooltoons2.com/rugrats/

− | production_website = http://www.nick.com/shows/rugrats

− }}


	+	

This series was partly made to promote the live-action film, and the pilot movie premiered on Nicktoons Network on May 2, a week before the feature film adaptation was released in theatres.[4] However, both projects were produced independently from one another and featured different generations of "Speed Racers" (with the film featuring the original generation), though both featured a Mach 6. − Rugrats is an American animated television series created by Arlene Klasky, Gábor Csupó, and Paul Germain for Nickelodeon. The series premiered on August 11, 1991 and aired its last episode on June 8, 2004.

− The show focuses on four babies and their day-to-day lives, usually involving common life experiences that become adventures in the babies' imaginations. It was one of the first three Nicktoons and also aired on Nick Jr. in 1995.


Premise[]

Premise[]

− The show originally revolved around a group of children (three boys and one girl), including infant Thomas "Tommy" Pickles, toddler Charles "Chuckie" Finster, and the twin-infants Phillip "Phil" and Lillian "Lil" DeVille. The toddlers are able to communicate with each other through baby speak, although viewers can understand them, because it is 'translated'. Often, they mispronounce words or use poor grammar and their speaking is full of malapropisms. An example of this is using the word "poopetrator" instead of "perpetrator." The group is often reluctantly joined by Tommy's cousin, Angelica Pickles. At three years old, Angelica is able to communicate and understand language from both the toddlers and the adults, which she often uses as an advantage when she wants to manipulate either party. She is usually very mean to the babies. Susie Carmichael, who lives across the street from the Pickles, is also able to communicate on the same level as Angelica, though she isn't manipulative. As a result, Angelica and Susie often clash.[5]


	+	

Prior to the events of the series, the original Speed Racer has disappeared for unknown reasons, but the main characters know that he is alive. Only one of the original characters, Spritle, has a major role in this show. Speed Racer is seen briefly at the end of The Note and more recently in Plot for Teacher. The rest of the original cast are unseen, and their whereabouts are currently unknown. − In 1998, a new character was introduced. After The Rugrats Movie, in which Tommy's baby brother Dylan "Dil" Pickles is born, he was soon added as a character on the show. As a four month old baby, Dil is not able to communicate with anyone. Later in 2000, after Rugrats in Paris: The Movie was released, Kimi Finster was added as a character. She is Chuckie's stepsister.[5]


	+	

The series follows the adventures of an orphan teenager named Speed who dreams of being a famed car racer like the one he is named after. He takes a bus to the elite Racing Academy, founded by the Racer family, and soon experiences the difficulties of fitting in and competing with X, the best racer/student in the school, and Speed Racer's son. Spritle himself is now the headmaster. −

Characters[]

Main article: List of Rugrats characters

File:Rugrats.JPG

The main babies. Clockwise from top: Tommy, Chuckie, Angelica, Lil, Phil, Dil, Kimi, and Susie.

− The Pickles are a mixed Jewish-Christian family. There are two episodes that reflect the Pickles' Jewish heritage, one episode deals with the Passover holiday and the other with Hanukkah (in addition to episodes about Christmas, Easter, Kwanzaa, etc.). These episodes have been praised by Jewish groups and are re-run every year on Nick at the appropriate holiday times and can also be purchased on VHS or DVD.Template:Citation needed


	+	

In the pilot movie, Speed discovers that he is the other son of Speed Racer, meaning that X is his brother. Through the rest of the series, Speed and his new allies set out on a quest to get through the courses, discover the mystery of Speed Racer's disappearance, and try and build the Mach 6, a car that captures the spirit and gadgets of the Mach 5 for new generations, and the first car to contain a gasless engine. −

Production[]

Rugrats was Nickelodeon's second Nicktoon, debuting on the same day as Doug (which premiered before it) and The Ren and Stimpy Show (which debuted after). The first run of the series was produced from 1991 to 1993 before production went on a hiatus (episodes that had not yet been released at that point continued to be released through 1994). Between 1994 and 1995, only two Jewish-themed specials were produced, and the rest of the series aired in reruns. New episode production resumed in 1997, and the show aired in Nickelodeon's Snick block from 1997-2000. In terms of years on air, it is the longest lasting Nicktoon to date, at over fourteen years longevity, and did not cease production of new episodes until 2004. In terms of number of episodes, it is still in first, but by 2011 it will be surpassed by SpongeBob SquarePants, which will have 178 episodes by the end of its ninth season, barring a Rugrats revival or a SpongeBob cancellation.[6]
The Rugrats received a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame in a ceremony on June 28, 2001.


	+	

The most pivotal plot device is the virtual track, a race track that transports racers to virtual racing environments known as the Virtual World. School faculty have the ability to add as many of their own obstacles as they wish, complying to school safety regulations. Whenever a racer is defeated in the track, they automatically get dispensed back onto the real one, unharmed. However, like all programs, the virtual track can be infested with viruses and/or hacked, causing anyone trapped in the Virtual World to be affected. − The show airs in the UK on CBBC, CITV, Nicktoons, Nickelodeon UK and Nicktoonsters as well as in Canada on YTV. In Australia, it can be seen on Nickelodeon Australia (and, for a period, ABC Television).


	+	

Characters[]

− On August 11, 2001, Rugrats celebrated its 10 year anniversary. The special/TV movie, Rugrats: All Growed Up was produced for the occasion. After the show, a special retrospective lookback aired, entitled Rugrats: Still Babies After All These Years. It was narrated by Amanda Bynes.

	+	
Main article: List of Speed Racer: The Next Generation Characters

− − The show ended in 2004. Two fairy-tale themed direct-to-video films based on the original series under the title, Rugrats: Tales from the Crib were planned and then released separately in 2005 and in 2006.

− − Individual episodes are now available for purchase on Amazon Video On Demand for 99 cents per episode and on the PlayStation Store for $1.99 for two episodes.

− −

Theatrical films[]

− In 1998, the first Rugrats film was released, entitled The Rugrats Movie, which introduced baby Dil, Tommy's little brother, onto the show. In 2000 the second movie, Rugrats in Paris: The Movie, was released, with two new characters introduced, Kimi and Kira. Kimi would become Chuckie's sister and Kira would become his new mother, after marrying his father. In 2003, the third movie, Rugrats Go Wild, was released. It was a crossover between the Rugrats and The Wild Thornberrys.[7]

− −

Reception[]

− In a 1995 interview, Steven Spielberg referred to Rugrats as one of several shows that are the best children's programming at the time. Spielberg described Rugrats as "sort of a TV Peanuts of our time."[8] It was named the 92nd best animated series by IGN.[9] Jewish and Christian religion groups have given Rugrats high praises for their special holiday episodes. Rugrats were also considered a strongpoint in Nickelodeon's rise in the 1990s.[10] [11] [12] [13]

− −

Episodes[]

Main article: List of Rugrats episodes

− −

Other projects[]

Main article: All Grown Up!

Main article: Angelica and Susie's Pre-School Daze

− −

DVD releases[]

− −

Nick dvd name Release date Discs Episodes

Season 1 (1991–92) June 2, 2009 3 13

Season 2 (1992–93) June 2, 2009 3 13

Tommy Troubles February 13, 2006 1 4

Save The Day August 8, 2005 1 9

Run Riot April 25, 2005 1 9

Mysteries September 6, 2004 1 4

− − Nickelodeon and Amazon.com have struck a deal to produce DVDs of new and old Nickelodeon shows, through the CreateSpace service. Using a concept similar to print on demand, Amazon will be making the discs, cover art, and disc art itself. The complete first and second seasons of Rugrats are on sale.[14]

− −

Broadcast history[]

Template:Cleanup-section

  • Template:Flagicon USA

    • Nickelodeon (1991–2007)

    • Nicktoons Network (2002–present)

− −

  • Template:Flagicon Canada

    • Nickelodeon (2009–present)

    • YTV (first-run)

− −

  • Template:Flagicon UK

    • Children's BBC (Including Live & Kicking and Smile) (1993–2004)

    • Nickelodeon (1994–2009)

    • Nicktoons (2002–2008, September 2009–present)

    • CITV (2005–2006)

    • Nicktoonsters (August 2008-July 2009)

− −

  • Template:Flagicon Australia

    • Nickelodeon (January 1995–present)

    • ABC Television (December 1991–present)

    • Network Ten (1999–2002)

− −

  • Template:Flagicon Spain

    • La 2

− −

  • Template:Flagicon Turkey

    • CNBC-E

    • Nickelodeon Turkey

    • TRT

− −

  • Template:Flagicon Argentina

    • The Big Channel

    • Magic Kids

    • Nickelodeon

    • Canal 9

− −

  • Template:Flagicon New Zealand

    • Nickelodeon NZ (199?-present)

    • TV2 (2003–present)

− −

  • Template:Flagicon Philippines

    • TV5

    • Nickelodeon South East Asia

    • Studio 23

− −

  • Template:Flagicon Israel

    • Channel 1 (1995)

    • Channel 2 (2000)

    • Nickelodeon Israel (2003–2008)

− −

  • Template:Flagicon Ireland

    • RTÉ Two (199?-present)

− −

  • Template:Flagicon Malaysia

    • Nickelodeon South East Asia

    • TV3 (1992–1994)

    • MetroVision (1996–1998)

    • NTV7 (2001–2004)

− −

  • Template:Flagicon Netherlands

    • Nickelodeon

− −

  • Template:Flagicon Ukraine

    • ICTV (Ukraine)

− −

  • Template:Flagicon Italy

    • Italia 1

− −

  • Template:Flagicon, Template:Flagicon, Template:Flagicon, Template:Flagicon, Template:Flagicon Latin America

    • Nickelodeon Latin America 1996 - 2006

    • XHGC-TV Canal 5 (1997–2001), repeats episodes sometimes.

− −

  • Template:Flagicon Pakistan

    • Nickelodeon (Pakistan) (2006–present)

− −

  • Template:Flagicon Sweden

    • Nickelodeon (Sweden)

− −

  • Template:Flagicon Japan

    • Nickelodeon (Japan) (1998–2008)

− −

  • Template:Flagicon Greece

    • Channel 9

− −

  • Template:Flagicon France

    • Nickelodeon (France) (2005–2008)

    • Nicktoons (France) (2003–2005)

− −

  • Template:Flagicon Croatia

    • Nickelodeon (Croatia) (1997–2008)

− −

  • Template:Flagicon China

    • Nickelodeon (China)

− −

  • Template:Flagicon Russia

    • Nickelodeon (CIS)

    • Nickelodeon on TNT

− −

  • Template:Flagicon South Africa

    • Nickelodeon (Africa) (1999–present)

− −

  • Template:Flagicon Arabia

    • Nickelodeon (Arab World) (2008–2010)


	+	

Mach Five and Mach Six[]

  • Template:Flagicon Brazil

    • Nickelodeon (Brazil)


	+	

The second episode features the rebuilt Mach 5 designed as it appeared in the original anime, only animated in CGI, like all of the other cars in the show's racing sequences. Minor changes have occurred in the Mach Five in this series. Although the function for the homing robot is present, it is redesigned to resemble more of a metal peacock than a sleek, futuristic robot dove. The Deflector is used as the roof of the Mach Five. Also revealed in this show is an ejector's seat underneath the driver's seat in case of emergencies. A parachute was made, but was forgotten to be installed at the time. −

  • Template:Flagicon India

    • Nick (India)


	+	

Its return is brief, as Zile Zazic destroys it successfully - the original makes a cameo in Plot for Teacher. However, plans for a new car are discovered and soon the protagonists rebuild the Mach Five to form the Mach 6. The Mach 6's engine is not designed to run on gas, which is a crucial story point, even though gas is still used for it through most of the series. It has all the features of the Mach Five, but redesigned or changed in some form or another. For example, the rotary saws are kept, but they're turned into laser saws. Also, the car has become more of a silver color with a fan in front and also includes two functional jets in the back where the fans were, and are used to get out of situations like a tornado ( as seen in the episode 'The Dance') or to help with acceleration. The new car features a transparent, holographic screen (better known as the 'comp') over the dashboard that the driver can use to interact live with his crew, and with other racers. Apparently, Speed mentions it can dispense rubber spiders out the back, and also real spiders, but he has not confirmed this. −

Awards[]

File:Rugrats on the Hollywood Walk of Fame.jpg

The Rugrats' star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame.

− −

Year

Association

Award Category

Result

1992

Daytime Emmy Award

Outstanding Animated Program

Won

1993

Daytime Emmy Award

Outstanding Animated Children's Program

Won

1994

CableAce

Animated Programming Special or Series

Nominated

Daytime Emmy Award

Outstanding Animated Children's Program

Won

1995

Annie Award

Best Individual Achievement for Writing in the Field of Animation

Nominated

Humanitas Prize

Children's Animation Category

Nominated

1996

Kids' Choice Awards

Favorite Cartoon

Won

1997

Emmy Award

Outstanding Children's Program

Nominated

Kids' Choice Awards

Favorite Cartoon

Won

1998

Kids' Choice Awards

Favorite Cartoon

Won

1999

Emmy Award

Outstanding Children's Program

Nominated

Genesis Award

Television - Children's Programming

Won

Kids' Choice Awards

Favorite Cartoon

Won

Humanitas Prize

Children's Animation Category

Won

Humanitas Prize

Children's Animation Category

Nominated

TV Guide Award

Favorite Children's Show

Nominated

World Animation Celebration

Best Director of Animation for a Daytime Series

Won

2000

Artios Award

Best Casting for Animated Voice Over - Television

Nominated

Kid's Choice Awards

Favorite Cartoon

Won

Emmy Award

Outstanding Children's Program

Nominated

TV Guide Award

Favorite Children's Show

Won

2001

Artios Award

Best Casting for Animated Voice Over - Television

Nominated

Emmy Award

Outstanding Children's Program

Nominated

Kids' Choice Awards

Favorite Cartoon

Won

Television Critics Association Awards

Outstanding Achievement in Children's Programming

Nominated

2002

Artios Award

Best Casting for Animated Voice Over - Television

Nominated

Emmy Award

Outstanding Children's Program

Nominated

Kid's Choice Awards

Favorite Cartoon

Won

2003

Artios Award

Best Casting for Animated Voice Over - Television

Nominated

Kid's Choice Awards

Favorite Cartoon

Won

Daytime Emmy Award

Outstanding Animated Children's Program

Won

2004

Daytime Emmy Award

Outstanding Animated Children's Program

Nominated


	+	

The Mach 6 succeeds the Mach 5 for the rest of the series, and more of the original gadgets were gradually revealed (such as the sludge slick) and used in future episodes. −

Video games[]

  • Rugrats: Search for Reptar (PlayStation)

  • Rugrats: Studio Tour (PlayStation)

  • Rugrats: Scavenger Hunt (Nintendo 64)

  • Rugrats in Paris - The Movie (Nintendo 64, Game Boy Color, PC CD Rom, PlayStation)

  • Rugrats: Totally Angelica (PlayStation, Game Boy Color)

  • Rugrats: Totally Angelica Boredom Busters (PC CD Rom)

  • Rugrats: Go Wild (PC CD Rom, Game Boy Advance)

  • Rugrats: All Growed Up - Older and Bolder (PC CD Rom)

  • Rugrats: Castle Capers (Game Boy Advance)

  • Rugrats: Royal Ransom (PlayStation 2, Nintendo GameCube)

  • Rugrats: I Gotta Go Party (Game Boy Advance)

  • Rugrats: The Movie (Game Boy, Game Boy Color)

  • Rugrats: Time Travelers (Game Boy Color)

  • Rugrats Activity Challenge (PC CD Rom)

  • Rugrats Adventure Game (PC CD Rom)

  • Rugrats Food Fight (Mobile Phone)

  • Rugrats Muchin Land (PC CD Rom)

  • The Rugrats Mystery Adventures (PC CD Rom)

  • Rocket Power: Team Rocket Rescue (PlayStation) (Tommy & Angelica appear as guest characters)

  • Nicktoons Racing (PlayStation, Game Boy Advance, Game Boy Color, Microsoft Windows, Arcade) (Tommy and Angelica playable)

  • Nicktoons: Attack of the Toybots (Wii, Nintendo DS, PlayStation 2, Game Boy Advance) (Tommy and Angelica are seen, but are not playable characters.)


See also[]

+

Episodes & DVDs[]

	+	
Main article: List of Speed Racer: The Next Generation episodes

Template:Portal

  • Klasky-Csupo


References[]

+

References[]

  1. Template:Cite news
  2. Template:Cite news
  3. Template:Cite news
  4. Template:Cite news
  5. 5.0 5.1 TV.com
  6. Template:Cite web
  7. Template:Cite news
  8. "Spielberg Toons in." TV Guide. October 28, 1995. 33.
  9. Template:Cite web
  10. Template:Cite news
  11. Template:Cite news
  12. Template:Cite news
  13. Template:Cite news
  14. Template:Cite web

+

External links[]

+

External links[]

	+	

Template:Wikiquote

  • Template:Imdb title

+

  • Template:Imdb title

  • Template:Tv.com show

+

  • Template:Tv.com
	+	

	+	

  • Template:Bcdb
	+	

Template:Daytime Emmy Award for Outstanding Children's Animated Program

Template:Rugrats

Template:SNICK/TEENick


Template:Nicktoons

Template:Nicktoons

	+	

Template:Speed RacerTemplate:Creators Syndicate Comics


− + − + − + − + − + − + − + −


	+	

es:Meteoro: la nueva generaciónda:Rollinger (filmserie)

	+	

pt:Speed Racer: Nova Geraçãode:Rugrats

es:Rugrats

fr:Les Razmoket

it:Rugrats

he:ראגרטס

la:Rugrats

hu:Fecsegő tipegők

ms:Rugrats

nl:Ratjetoe (tekenfilmserie)

ja:ラグラッツ

pl:Pełzaki (serial animowany)

pt:Rugrats

ru:Ох, уж эти детки!

simple:Rugrats

fi:Ipanat

sv:Rugrats

tl:Rugrats

tr:Rugrats

uk:Невгамовні

Revision as of 22:06, 18 August 2010 Speed Racer: The Next Generation Created by Larry Schwarz (based on the original series created by Tatsuo Yoshida) Developed by Nickelodeon Studios Written by Ben Gruber Allan Neuwirth Marv Wolfman Susan Kim Justin Gray Jimmy Palmiotti Aaron Bergeron Daniel Schofield Mike Yank Walt Gardner James Harvey Directed by Stephen Moverley John Holt Starring Kurt Csolak Sahra Mellesse Carter Jackson Peter Fernandez Michael Sinterniklaas Robbie Sublett David Zen Mansley Opening theme "Go Speed Racer Go!", rearranged by John Angier Ending theme "Go Speed Racer Go!" (w/o vocals) Composer John Angier Country of origin United States No. of seasons 1 No. of episodes 26 (list of episodes) Production Executive producers Larry Schwarz James Rocknowski John Rocknowski Producers Larry Schwarz Ken Katsumoto James Rocknowski John Rocknowski Sergei Aniskov Sean Lahey Christopher Fauci Michael Gold Doug MacLennon Running time 30 minutes (approx.) Production companies Animation Collective Lionsgate Television Nickelodeon Animation Studios Release Original network Nickelodeon (2008) Nicktoons (2008-present) Original release May 2, 2008 – present Chronology Preceded by Speed Racer Speed Racer X Related shows Three Delivery Kappa Mikey External links Website Speed Racer: The Next Generation is an American animated television series based on the classic Japanese Speed Racer franchise, in which the internal events take place decades after those in the 1967 Japanese series. It is the fourth television adaptation of the franchise, and is executive produced by Lions Gate Entertainment, Larry Schwarz, and Ken Katsumoto. It is the first Nicktoon not to be based on an original property.[1] Animation Collective produced the series, while the Flash character animation was handled by the now-defunct Collideascope Studios as their very last project.[citation needed] The last episode features the voice of NASCAR racer Jeff Gordon, who plays Turbo McCalister.

This series was partly made to promote the live-action film, and the pilot movie premiered on Nicktoons Network on May 2, a week before the feature film adaptation was released in theatres.[2] However, both projects were produced independently from one another and featured different generations of "Speed Racers" (with the film featuring the original generation), though both featured a Mach 6.


Contents 1 Premise 2 Characters 3 Mach Five and Mach Six 4 Episodes & DVDs 5 References 6 External links Premise Prior to the events of the series, the original Speed Racer has disappeared for unknown reasons, but the main characters know that he is alive. Only one of the original characters, Spritle, has a major role in this show. Speed Racer is seen briefly at the end of The Note and more recently in Plot for Teacher. The rest of the original cast are unseen, and their whereabouts are currently unknown.

The series follows the adventures of an orphan teenager named Speed who dreams of being a famed car racer like the one he is named after. He takes a bus to the elite Racing Academy, founded by the Racer family, and soon experiences the difficulties of fitting in and competing with X, the best racer/student in the school, and Speed Racer's son. Spritle himself is now the headmaster.

In the pilot movie, Speed discovers that he is the other son of Speed Racer, meaning that X is his brother. Through the rest of the series, Speed and his new allies set out on a quest to get through the courses, discover the mystery of Speed Racer's disappearance, and try and build the Mach 6, a car that captures the spirit and gadgets of the Mach 5 for new generations, and the first car to contain a gasless engine.

The most pivotal plot device is the virtual track, a race track that transports racers to virtual racing environments known as the Virtual World. School faculty have the ability to add as many of their own obstacles as they wish, complying to school safety regulations. Whenever a racer is defeated in the track, they automatically get dispensed back onto the real one, unharmed. However, like all programs, the virtual track can be infested with viruses and/or hacked, causing anyone trapped in the Virtual World to be affected.

Characters Main article: List of Speed Racer: The Next Generation Characters Mach Five and Mach Six The second episode features the rebuilt Mach 5 designed as it appeared in the original anime, only animated in CGI, like all of the other cars in the show's racing sequences. Minor changes have occurred in the Mach Five in this series. Although the function for the homing robot is present, it is redesigned to resemble more of a metal peacock than a sleek, futuristic robot dove. The Deflector is used as the roof of the Mach Five. Also revealed in this show is an ejector's seat underneath the driver's seat in case of emergencies. A parachute was made, but was forgotten to be installed at the time.

Its return is brief, as Zile Zazic destroys it successfully - the original makes a cameo in Plot for Teacher. However, plans for a new car are discovered and soon the protagonists rebuild the Mach Five to form the Mach 6. The Mach 6's engine is not designed to run on gas, which is a crucial story point, even though gas is still used for it through most of the series. It has all the features of the Mach Five, but redesigned or changed in some form or another. For example, the rotary saws are kept, but they're turned into laser saws. Also, the car has become more of a silver color with a fan in front and also includes two functional jets in the back where the fans were, and are used to get out of situations like a tornado ( as seen in the episode 'The Dance') or to help with acceleration. The new car features a transparent, holographic screen (better known as the 'comp') over the dashboard that the driver can use to interact live with his crew, and with other racers. Apparently, Speed mentions it can dispense rubber spiders out the back, and also real spiders, but he has not confirmed this.

The Mach 6 succeeds the Mach 5 for the rest of the series, and more of the original gadgets were gradually revealed (such as the sludge slick) and used in future episodes.

Episodes & DVDs Main article: List of Speed Racer: The Next Generation episodes References

"Return Laps for the First Voice of Speed Racer". New York Times. Retrieved 2008-08-12.
"Nicktoons Network To Premiere New Speed Racer Series In May". Animation News Network. Retrieved 2010-04-21.

External links Official Speed Racer site Speed Racer: The Next Generation on IMDb Please use a more specific TV.com template. See the documentation for available templates. Speed Racer Deals Cross Finish Line NYCC 08: Speed Racer's Next Generation Revealed TV Guide's Speed Racer: The Next Generation episodes Template:Nicktoons

vte Speed Racer by Tatsuo Yoshida Franchise MangaAnimeThe New AdventuresXThe Next Generation episodescharactersFilm soundtrackRace to the Future Video games The Challenge of Racer XMy Most Dangerous AdventuresSpeed Racer (1995)Speed Racer (1996)Speed Racer (2008) Miscellaneous Mach FiveRacer XLego Speed Racer Categories: Speed RacerAmerican animated television seriesAnime-influenced animation2008 American television series debuts2009 American television series endings2010 American television series debutsTelevision series by Lionsgate Television Navigation menu Not logged in Talk Contributions Create account Log in ArticleTalk ReadView sourceView historySearch Search Wikipedia Main page Contents Current events Random article About Wikipedia Contact us Donate Contribute Help Learn to edit Community portal Recent changes Upload file Tools What links here Related changes Special pages Permanent link Page information Cite this page Wikidata item Print/export Download as PDF Printable version

Languages Español עברית Magyar Português Русский ไทย Edit links This page was last edited on 18 August 2010, at 22:06 (UTC). This version of the page has been revised. Besides normal editing, the reason for revision may have been that this version contains factual inaccuracies, vandalism, or material not compatible with the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License. Privacy policyAbout WikipediaDisclaimersContact WikipediaMobile viewDevelopersStatisticsCookie statementEnable previews Wikimedia FoundationPowered by MediaWiki Rugrats and Speed Racer: The Next Generation: Difference between pages From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (Difference between pages) Jump to navigationJump to search Revision as of 18:57, 17 August 2011 (view source) Xqbot (talk | contribs) m (r2.7.2) (robot Modifying: da:Rollinger (tv-serie))

Revision as of 00:47, 11 August 2011 (edit) 66.31.216.101 (talk)

Line 1: Line 1:

	+	

{{Infobox Television − Template:Dablink

	+	
| show_name          = Speed Racer: The Next Generation

Template:For

	+	
| image              = 

Template:Pp-semi-protected

	+	
| creator            = Larry Schwarz
(based on the original series created by Tatsuo Yoshida)

Template:Pp-move-indef

	+	
| format             = Animated sitcom science-fiction

− {{Infobox television

	+	
| voices           = Kurt Csolak
Sahra Mellesse
Carter Jackson
Peter Fernandez
(Season 1)
Michael Sinterniklaas
Robbie Sublett
(Season 1)
David Zen Mansley
Greg Abbey
(Season 2-present)
Bryan Tyler
(Season 2-present)

− | show_name = Rugrats

	+	
| producer           = Larry Schwarz
Ken Katsumoto
James Rocknowski
John Rocknowski
Sergei Aniskov
Sean Lahey
Christopher Fauci
Michael Gold
Doug MacLennon

− | image = File:Rugrats-logo.jpg

	+	
| writer             = Ben Gruber
Allan Neuwirth
Marv Wolfman
Susan Kim
Justin Gray
Jimmy Palmiotti
Aaron Bergeron
Daniel Schofield
Mike Yank
Walt Gardner
James Harvey

− | caption = Title card

− | show_name_2 = +

| director           = Stephen Moverley
John Holt + | opentheme = "Go Speed Racer Go!", rearranged by John Angier

− | genre = Children's television series
Fantasy

− | format = Animated series +

| endtheme           = "Go Speed Racer Go!" (w/o vocals)

− | creator = Arlene Klasky
Gabor Csupo
Paul Germain +

| composer           = John Angier
	+	
| country            = United States

− | writer = Joe Ansolabehere
Craig Bartlett
Kate Boutilier
Dan Danko
Michael Ferris
Melody Fox
Peter Gaffney
Paul Germain
Jonathan Greenberg
Rachel Lipman
Tom Mason
Dave Polsky
Jeffrey Townsend
Steve Viksten
Jeff Wynne

	+	
| num_seasons        = 2

− | director = Howard Baker
Rick Bugental
Jim Duffy
Steve Moore
Steve Socki
Dan Thompson
Norton Virgien
Dave Fontana
Tony Vian
Louie del Carmen
Chris Hermans
Anthony Bell
Bob Fuentes III
Carol Millican

− | creative_director = Paul Germain +

| num_episodes       = 35 (aired)
	+	
| list_episodes      = List of Speed Racer: The Next Generation episodes

− | starring = E.G. Daily
Christine Cavanaugh
Nancy Cartwright
Kath Soucie
Cheryl Chase
Tara Strong
Cree Summer
Dionne Quan
Melanie Chartoff
Jack Riley
Michael Bell
Tress MacNeille
David Doyle
Philip Proctor
Joe Alaskey
Debbie Reynolds
Julia Kato

− | narrated = +

| runtime            = 30 minutes (approx.)
	+	
| status             = Returning Series

− | theme_music_composer = Mark Mothersbaugh

	+	
| company            = Animation Collective
(Season 1)
Telegael
(Season 2-present)
Toonz Entertainment
(Season 2-present)

− | opentheme = "The Rugrats Theme"

	+	
| distributor        = Lionsgate Television

− | endtheme = "The Rugrats Theme" (sped up and remixed)

	+	
| network            = Nicktoons

− | composer = Mark Mothersbaugh
Bob Mothersbaugh
Denis Hannigan
Rusty Andrews

	+	
| executive_producer = Larry Schwarz
James Rocknowski
John Rocknowski

− | voice director = Charlie Adler

	+	
| preceded_by        = Speed Racer
Speed Racer X

− | country = United States

− | language = English +

| related            = Three Delivery
Kappa Mikey

− | num_seasons = 9 +

| first_aired        = Template:Start date

− | num_episodes = 172 +

| last_aired         = present
	+	
| website            = http://www.lionsgate.com/speedracer/

− | list_episodes = List of Rugrats episodes

	+	
}}

− | executive_producer = Vanessa Coffey
Gabor Csupo
Arlene Klasky

	+	

Speed Racer: The Next Generation is an American animated television series based on the classic Japanese Speed Racer franchise, in which the internal events take place decades after those in the 1967 Japanese series. It is the fourth television adaptation of the franchise, and is executive produced by Lions Gate Entertainment, Larry Schwarz, and Ken Katsumoto. It is the first Nicktoon not to be based on an original property.[1] Animation Collective produced the series, while the Flash character animation was handled by the now-defunct Collideascope Studios as their very last project.[2] The last episode of Season 1 features the voice of NASCAR racer Jeff Gordon, who plays Turbo McCalister. − | producer = Cella Nichols Harris
Geraldine Clarke
David Blum
Paul Germain
Kate Boutilier

− | editor = Karl Garabedian
John Bryant

− | location = Universal Studios, Florida

− | cinematography = Animation

− | camera = Single-camera

− | runtime = 23–24 minutes

− | company = Klasky Csupo
Nickelodeon Animation Studios[3]

− | distributor = Paramount Home Entertainment

− | channel = Nickelodeon[4]

− | picture_format = NTSC

− | audio_format = Surround

− | first_shown = Template:Start date

− | first_aired = Template:Start date

− | last_aired = Template:End date

− | status = Ended

− | preceded_by =

− | followed_by = All Grown Up!
(2003–2008)

− | related = Angelica and Susie's Pre-School Daze
(2005–2008)

− | website = http://www.cooltoons2.com/rugrats/

− | production_website = http://www.nick.com/shows/rugrats

− }}


	+	

This series was partly made to promote the live-action film, and the pilot movie premiered on Nicktoons Network on May 2, 2008, a week before the feature film adaptation was released in theatres.[5] However, both projects were produced independently from one another and featured different generations of "Speed Racers" (with the film featuring the original generation), though both featured a Mach 6. − Rugrats is an American animated television series created by Arlene Klasky, Gábor Csupó, and Paul Germain for Nickelodeon. The series premiered on August 11, 1991 and aired its last episode on June 8, 2004.


	+	

A second season began airing on March 24, 2011. [6] [7] The animation, layout, and 3D effects were outsourced to Toonz Entertainment in India for this season. After his death, Peter Fernandez's roles were replaced by Greg Abbey. − The show focuses on eight babies, as well as a dog, and their day-to-day lives, usually involving common life experiences that become adventures in the babies' imaginations.[8][9] It was one of the first three Nicktoons and also aired on Nick Jr. in 1995.


Characters[]

+

Premise[]

Main article: List of Rugrats characters

File:Rugrats.JPG

The main babies. Clockwise from top: Tommy, Chuckie, Angelica, Lil, Phil, Dil, Kimi, and Susie.

− The show originally revolved around four children (three boys and one girl) and a dog. The fearless brave leader Thomas "Tommy" Pickles (whose family moved from Akron, Ohio to their current location in California), the cautious toddler Charles "Chuckie" Finster who reluctantly agreed to venture out into the open, unsafe areas of the house, the twin-infants Phillip "Phil" and Lillian "Lil" DeVille who were ready for a new challenge, and Spike, Tommy's dog. The toddlers are able to communicate with each other through baby speak, although viewers can understand them, because it is 'translated'. A running gag in the show is that they mispronounce words or use poor grammar and their speaking is full of malapropisms. An example of this is using the word "poopetrator" instead of "perpetrator" in "The Trial" episode. The group is often reluctantly joined by Tommy's cousin, Angelica Pickles. At three years old, Angelica is able to communicate and understand language from both the toddlers and the adults, which she often uses as an advantage when she wants to manipulate either party. She is usually very mean to the babies. Susie Carmichael, who lives across the street from the Pickles, is also able to communicate on the same level as Angelica, though she is not manipulative. As a result of this, as well as being favored by the babies, she often clashes with Angelica.[10]


	+	

Prior to the events of the series, the original Speed Racer has disappeared for unknown reasons, but the main characters know that he is alive. Only one of the original characters, Spritle, has a major role in this show. Speed Racer is seen briefly at the end of The Note and more recently in Plot for Teacher, and he makes a full appearance in the pilot episode to Season 2. The rest of the original cast are unseen, and their whereabouts are currently unknown. − After The Rugrats Movie (1998), in which Tommy's baby brother Dylan "Dil" Pickles is born, he was soon added as a character on the show. As a 1 year old baby, Dil is not able to communicate with anyone. Later after Rugrats in Paris: The Movie (2000) was released, Kimi Finster was added as a character. She is Chuckie's stepsister.[11]


	+	

The series follows the adventures of an orphan teenager named Speed who dreams of being a famed car racer like the one he is named after. He takes a bus to the elite Racing Academy, founded by the Racer family, and soon experiences the difficulties of fitting in and competing with X, the best racer/student in the school, and Speed Racer's son. Spritle himself is now the headmaster. − Leaving the safety of their own playpen, the children would explore their surroundings and try to make sense out of what the adults are doing. The babies often manage to get away with meandering off and going on escapades, for the reason that Tommy’s daddy, Stu, is more often than not trying to create toys downstairs in the basement. Tommy's mother, Didi, is normally reading the most modern good-parenting guide too actively to take any kind of notice, and his paternal grandfather, Lou, is customarily sleeping in front of the television, oblivious to their antics.[12] While most of the time, the babies are in their playpen, they always manage to get out using a plastic screwdriver Tommy keeps in his diaper (unbeknownst to any of the adults). When they create any kind of mess or visible damage, they are almost never seen as the instigators, due to them being babies. If an older person is in the vicinity of the mess (usually Angelica), that individual is held accountable. The most treacherous escapade the babies embarked occured in The Rugrats Movie where they got lost in the forest going against a man-eating wolf and a pack of circus monkeys determined to steal their baby food.


	+	

In the pilot movie, Speed discovers that he is the other son of Speed Racer, meaning that X is his brother. Through the rest of the series, Speed and his new allies set out on a quest to get through the courses, discover the mystery of Speed Racer's disappearance, and try and build the Mach 6, a car that captures the spirit and gadgets of the Mach 5 for new generations, and the first car to contain a gasless engine. − The Pickles are a mixed Jewish-Christian family. There are two episodes that reflect the Pickles' Jewish heritage, one episode deals with the Passover holiday and the other with Hanukkah (in addition to episodes about Christmas, Easter, Kwanzaa, etc.).[13][14]


	+	

The most pivotal plot device is the virtual track, a race track that transports racers to virtual racing environments known as the Virtual World. School faculty have the ability to add as many of their own obstacles as they wish, complying to school safety regulations. Whenever a racer is defeated in the track, they automatically get dispensed back onto the real one, unharmed. However, like all programs, the virtual track can be infected with viruses and/or hacked, causing anyone trapped in the Virtual World to be affected. −

Origins[]

Rugrats was formed by the then husband-and-wife duo of Gabor Csupo and Arlene Klasky, along with Paul Germain in 1989. Klasky-Csupo had a major animation firm at the time which also provided services for commercials and music videos. Klasky, Csupo, and Germain were also animating The Simpsons at the time, which they would continue to do until 1992. The trio decided to create their own series in reaction to a proclamation by the children's cable network Nickelodeon that they were to launch their own line of animated shows, which would be later called Nicktoons. With the comedic stimulation branching from the antics of Klasky and Csupo's infant children, the 6Template:Frac–minute pilot episode, "Tommy Pickles & the Great White Thing" (never to be aired), went into production.


	+	

Characters[]

Peter Chung, along with Klasky and Csupo, co-designed the characters and directed the series pilot, "Tommy Pickles And The Great White Thing," as well as the opening sequence. The production was completed in 1990 and they submitted it to Nickelodeon, who tested it with an audience of children. The feedback for the pilot episode was primarily positive. With that, the series went into production. Chuckie and Angelica were added as characters.

	+	
Main article: List of Speed Racer: The Next Generation Characters

− − Paul Germain felt that the series needed a bully. Angelica was based on a bully in Germain's childhood, who was a girl. In addition to that, it was Germain who decided that Angelica would be a spoiled brat. Arlene Klasky, one of the show's creators initially did not like Angelica Pickles. Klasky also protested Angelica's actions in episodes like "Barbecue Story" (where she threw Tommy's ball over the fence).

− − In a New Yorker article, Klasky said, "I think she's a bully. I never liked Angelica." Klasky never fully approved of her character development. Her bullying caused Arlene to disdain her. Angelica started to become a problem for the some of the Rugrats staff. In some instances, her voice, Cheryl Chase, had trouble portraying a mean Angelica. To help Chase out, Steve Viksen, one of the writers, would mention that Angelica was the series's J.R. Ewing.

− − After the episode "The Trial," Klasky complained that the Rugrats were starting to act too old for their age. Csupo often acted as a mediator in arguments between Klasky and the writers, with the writers often winning. Some of the offscreen tensions ultimately found their way into the scripts and, naturally, into the show. In 1993, shortly before Nick premiered the last of the original 65, production of new episodes ceased, and most of the Rugrats writing team left Klasky-Csupo. After the first run days were over, Nick had enough episodes to show every day, and did just that in 1994, scheduling the show in the early evening, when both kids and parents will be watching. After 3 years of repeats, the show went back into production. However, the tensions between Klasky-Csupo and their former writers still existed.

− − After The Rugrats Movie and seeing the "new" Angelica in the film, Klasky changed her tune: "I think she's great for the show; I love Angelica."[15]

− −

Production[]

Rugrats was Nickelodeon's second Nicktoon, debuting on the same day as Doug (which premiered before it) and The Ren and Stimpy Show (which debuted after). The first run of the series was produced from 1991 to 1993 before production went on a hiatus (episodes that had not yet been released at that point continued to be released through 1994). Between 1995 and 1996, only two Jewish-themed specials were aired, and the rest of the series aired in reruns. Production on new episodes began 1997, and the show aired in Nickelodeon's Snick block from 1997 to 2000. As of 2011, it is the longest-lasting Nicktoon to date, at over fourteen years longevity, and did not cease production of new episodes until 2004. In terms of number of episodes, it is still in first, but by 2011 it will be surpassed by SpongeBob SquarePants, which will have 178 episodes by the end of its eighth season, barring a Rugrats revival or a SpongeBob cancellation; SpongeBob will reach Rugrats in terms of years on air in 2013.[16]

− − On August 11, 2001, Rugrats celebrated its 10-year anniversary. The special/TV movie, Rugrats: All Growed Up was produced for the occasion. After the show, a special retrospective lookback aired, entitled "Rugrats: Still Babies After All These Years." It was narrated by Amanda Bynes. Nickelodeon approved of its ratings and popularity so much (about 70% of viewers with cable tuned in), they eventually commissioned a full series, All Grown Up, which ran from 2003 to 2008.

− − Rugrats ended on June 8, 2004, along with fellow Nicktoon, Hey Arnold. After the run, two fairy-tale themed direct-to-video films based on the original series under the title, Rugrats: Tales from the Crib were produced and then released separately in 2005 and in 2006.

− −

Voice actors[]

− − Through its full run, Rugrats, occupied several main voice actors. E.G. Daily provided the voice of Tommy Pickles, except in the unaired pilot where Tami Holbrook provided the voice; Christine Cavanaugh was the original voice of Chuckie Finster, but left after 2001 for personal reasons and was subsequently replaced by Nancy Cartwright in 2002. The fraternal twins, Phil and Lil (as well as their mother, Betty) were voiced by Kath Soucie; Dil Pickles (and Timmy McNulty) were voiced by Tara Strong. Cheryl Chase initially auditioned for the role of Tommy, but was passed up. When the show came to series, she was brought on board to be cast as the voice of Angelica Pickles. Dionne Quan was the voice of Kimi Finster, however as she is legally blind, in order to do the voice, the producers had to interpret the scripts into Braille, so she could read them by sensing the bumps with her fingers. Susie was primarily voiced by Cree Summer, though in two episodes where she could not be in attendance E.G. Daily filled in.[17] Other regular voice actors included Melanie Chartoff as Didi Pickles, Jack Riley as Stu Pickles, Tress MacNeille as Charlotte Pickles, and Michael Bell as Drew Pickles and Chaz Finster. David Doyle provided the voice of Grandpa Lou Pickles until his death in 1997, where Joe Alaskey took over till the end of the series. In 2000, Debbie Reynolds joined the cast as Lulu Pickles, Lou's second wife, and remained until the series' end.

− −

Writing style[]

− With Rugrats it usually took a few months to make an episode, for the story has to get written, and then approved. The next process consisted of voice recording, storyboarding, pre-eliminating animation, overseas production & delivery, editing and polishing. All of that had to happen even before Klasky-Csupo sent the master tapes to Nick. In addition, fine animation took time to make. During the first six seasons of Rugrats it was, primarily divided into two eleven-minute episodes. After the second movie, during season 7, Rugrats made a change with a different format that consisted of three episodes per show, though it returned to its original two-episode-per-show format in the final two seasons.[18]

− −

Episodes[]

Main article: List of Rugrats episodes

− −

Other projects[]

Main article: All Grown Up!

Main article: Angelica and Susie's Pre-School Daze

− −

DVD releases[]

− − − − − − − − − −
Nick DVD name Release date Discs Episodes

Season 1 (1991–92) June 2, 2009 3 13

Season 2 (1992–93) June 2, 2009 3 13

Tommy Troubles February 13, 2006 1 4

Save The Day August 8, 2005 1 9

Run Riot April 25, 2005 1 9

Mysteries September 6, 2004 1 4

Movie Trilogy March 15, 2011 3 3 Films

Halloween September 20, 2011 1 TBA[19]

− − Nickelodeon and Amazon.com have struck a deal to produce DVDs of new and old Nickelodeon shows, through the CreateSpace service. Using a concept similar to print on demand, Amazon made the discs, cover art, and disc art itself. The complete first and second seasons of Rugrats were released on June 2, 2009 along with The Fairly OddParents first and second seasons.[20]

− −

Nick Picks DVDs[]

− These 2 Rugrats episodes were released on the Nick Picks DVDs.

− −

  • Nick Picks Volume 1: Finsterella

  • Nick Picks Volume 2: All Growed Up

− −

Reception and achievements[]

Critical reception[]

− − Since its debut in 1991, Rugrats generally received positive reviews from critics and fans. In a 1995 interview, Steven Spielberg referred to the show as one of several shows that are the best children's programming at the time. Spielberg described Rugrats as "sort of a TV Peanuts of our time."[21] It was named the 92nd-best animated series by IGN.[22] Rugrats was also considered a strong point in Nickelodeon's rise in the 1990s.[23][24][25][26] In a press release celebrating the show's 10th anniversary, Cyma Zarghami stated, "During the past decade, 'Rugrats' has evolved from a ratings powerhouse, being the number one children's show on TV, to pop icon status. It has secured a place in the hearts of both kids and adults, who see it from their own point of view".[27] According to Nickelodeon producers, this show made them the number-one channel in the 1990s.[28] Jeff Jarvis reviewed Rugrats and stated, "When the Simpsons was a segment on The Tracey Ullman Show, it was just a belch joke with hip pretensions. As a series, it grew flesh and guts. It was my favorite cartoon...until I discovered Nickelodeon's Rugrats, a sardonic, sly, kid's eye view of the world that skewers thirty-something parents and (The) Cosby (Show) kids."[29]

− −

Popularity, appeal, and controversy[]

Template:See also

− − When Rugrats débuted in 1991, it was not as hugely popular as it would later become. When production went on a hiatus from 1994, Nick began showing Rugrats repeats everyday. More and more people began to take notice of the show, with ratings and popularity for Rugrats and Nick rising. From 1995 to 2000, it was the highest-rated show on Nickelodeon and the highest rated kids' show. The show experienced a wide diverse audience consisting of kids, teenagers and adults alike. Rugrats was successful in receiving an average of 26.7 million viewers every week: 14.7 million kids (2-11), 3.2 million teens (12-17), and 8.8 million adults (18 and over). In addition, Rugrats was seen internationally in over 76 countries.[27] It was the only one of the three original Nicktoons that continued in the 2000s, and had its own spin-off. It is the most successful of the three original Nicktoons. While the other Nicktoons were popular during their run, Doug would later slip out of Nick's hands and into Disney's; and Ren and Stimpy would crash and burn in a creative rights dispute (only to return several years later in a much raunchier version on another network). During its run, Rugrats was enjoyed by a number of famous stars including Alexa Vega, Daryl Sabara, Amanda Bynes, Aaron Carter, Ray Romano, Nivea and Bow Wow.[30]

− − With 172 episodes produced over the course of nearly 13 years, Rugrats remains the longest-running Nicktoon to date. SpongeBob SquarePants will surpass both benchmarks when it airs its 173rd episode on February 27, 2012.

− − Rugrats was one of very few shows that pictured observant, identifiably Jewish families.[31] Jewish and Christian religion groups gave the show high praises for their special holiday episodes. Nonetheless, at one point the Anti-Defamation League and the Washington Post editorial page castigated the series for its depiction of the Pickles grandparents, who purportedly looked like Nazi caricatures.[31]

− −

Awards and nominations[]

− − − − − − − − − − − − − − − − − − − − − − − − − − − − − − − − − − − − − − − − − − −
Year

Association

Award Category

Nominee

Result

1992

Daytime Emmy Award

Outstanding Animated Program

Won

1993

Daytime Emmy Award

Outstanding Animated Children's Program

Won

1994

CableAce

Animated Programming Special or Series

Won

Daytime Emmy Award

Outstanding Animated Children's Program

Won

1995

Annie Award

Best Individual Achievement for Writing in the Field of Animation

'A Rugrats Passover'

Nominated

Humanitas Prize

Children's Animation Category

'I Remember Melville'

Nominated

CableAce

Animated Programming Special or Series

Nominated

1996

Kids' Choice Awards

Favorite Cartoon

Won

1997

Emmy Award

Outstanding Children's Program

Nominated

Kids' Choice Awards

Favorite Cartoon

Won

Young Artist Awards

Best Performance in a Voiceover

Charity Sanoy for Dust Bunnies/Educating Angelica

Nominated

CableAce

Best Writing In A Children's Special Or Series

Episode 'Mother's Day'

Won

1998

Kids' Choice Awards

Favorite Cartoon

Won[32]

Humanitas Prize

Children's Animation Category

Episode: Mothers Day Special

Nominated

1999

Emmy Award

Outstanding Children's Program

Nominated

Genesis Award

Television - Children's Programming

'The Turkey That Came to Dinner'

Won

Kids' Choice Awards

Favorite Cartoon

Won[33]

Humanitas Prize

Children's Animation Category

Episode 'Autumn Leaves'

Won

TV Guide Award

Favorite Children's Show

Nominated

World Animation Celebration

Best Director of Animation for a Daytime Series

Episode 'Naked Tommy'

Won

Kids Choice Awards

Favorite Movie

Won

Cable Guide

Favorite Cartoon

Nominated

2000

Artios Award

Best Casting for Animated Voice Over - Television

Nominated

Kid's Choice Awards

Favorite Cartoon

Won

Emmy Award

Outstanding Children's Program

Nominated

TV Guide Award

Favorite Children's Show

Won

2001

Artios Award

Best Casting for Animated Voice Over - Television

Nominated

Emmy Award

Outstanding Children's Program

Nominated

Star on the Hollywood Walk Of Fame

Television

Won

Kids' Choice Awards

Favorite Cartoon

Won

Television Critics Association Awards

Outstanding Achievement in Children's Programming

Nominated

Jewish Image Awards

Outstanding Achievement

Won

2002

Artios Award

Best Casting for Animated Voice Over - Television

'Cynthia Comes Alive'

Nominated

Emmy Award

Outstanding Children's Program

Special: All Growed Up

Nominated

Kid's Choice Awards

Favorite Cartoon

Nominated

BMI Cable Award

Won

2003

Artios Award

Best Casting for Animated Voice Over - Television

'Babies in Toyland'

Nominated

Kid's Choice Awards

Favorite Cartoon

Nominated

Daytime Emmy Award

Outstanding Animated Children's Program

Won

BMI Cable Award

Won

2004

Daytime Emmy Award

Outstanding Animated Children's Program

Nominated

− −

Honors[]

File:Rugrats on the Hollywood Walk of Fame.jpg

The Rugrats received a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame in a ceremony on June 28, 2001, commemorating the show's 10th anniversary.

− On June 28, 2001, in commemoration of their tenth anniversary, Rugrats received a star on the fabled Hollywood Walk of Fame, making it Nickelodeon’s first (and to date, only) series to receive a star. It was placed at 6600 W. Hollywood Bl., near Cherokee Ave. outside a toy and costume shop.[34]

− − In the October 2001 issue of Wizard Magazine, a leading magazine for comic book fans, they released the results of the 100 Greatest Toons ever, as selected by their readers, Rugrats ranked at #35. Three other Nicktoons—SpongeBob SquarePants, Invader Zim, and Ren and Stimpy—also placed on the list.[35]

− − In a list of TV Land’s The 2000 Best Things About Television, ranking the all-time TV shows, channels, commercials, people, catch phrases, etc., Rugrats is ranked #699.[36]

− − Angelica Pickles placed 7th in TV Guide's list of “Top 50 Greatest Cartoon Characters of All Time” in 2002.[37]

− −

Rugrats in other media[]

Films[]

− In 1998, The Rugrats Movie was released, which introduced baby Dil, Tommy's little brother, onto the show. It grossed in worldwide results, $140,894,675, making it a very large box office success, considering its modest $24 million budget. Not only was the movie a commercial success, the film earned mixed to positive reviews from critics. As of 2011, it remains the highest grossing Rugrats film to date. In 2000 a sequel, Rugrats in Paris: The Movie, was released, with two new characters introduced, Kimi and Kira. Kimi would become Chuckie's sister and Kira would become his new mother, after marrying his father. While it received a positive reception, it did not gross as high as the first film.

− In 2003, Rugrats Go Wild was released. It was a crossover between the Rugrats and The Wild Thornberrys.[38] It is the lowest grossing Rugrats film to date.

− −

Comics[]

− From 1998 to 2003, Nick produced a Rugrats comic strip, which was distributed through Creator's Syndicate. Initially written by show-writer Scott Gray and drawn by comic book artist Steve Crespo, with Rob Armstrong as editor. Will Blyberg came on board shortly after as inker. By the end of '98, Lee Nordling, who had joined as a contributing gag writer, took over as editor. Nordling hired extra writers, including Gordon Kent, Scott Roberts, Chuck Kim, J. Torres, Marc Bilgrey, and John Zakour, as well new artists including Gary Fields, Tim Harkins, Vince Giaranno, and Scott Roberts. Stu Chaifetz colored the Sunday strips. The Rugrats strip started out in many papers, but as often happens with spin-off strips, soon slowed down. It's still seen in some papers in re-runs. Two paperback collections were published by Andrews McMeel It's A Jungle-Gym Out There and A Baby's Work Is Never Done.

− − During this time, Nickelodeon also published 30 issues of an all Rugrats comic magazine. Most of these were edited by Frank Pittarese and Dave Roman, and featured stories and art by the comic strip creators and others. The last nine issues featured cover art by Scott Roberts, who wrote and drew many of the stories. Other writers included Roman, Chris Duffy, Patrick M. O'Connell & Joyce Mann, and Jim Spivey. Other artists included Joe Staton and Ernie Colón. The magazine also included short stories, many by Pittarese, and games, as well as reprints from an earlier, UK produced Rugrats comic.

− − Finally, Nick produced a special, 50 page comic magazine retelling of the film Rugrats In Paris, edited by Pittarese and Roman, with script by Scott Gray, pencils by Scott Roberts, and inks by Adam DeKraker.

− −

Video games[]

  • Rugrats: Search for Reptar (PlayStation)

  • Rugrats: Studio Tour (PlayStation)

  • Rugrats: Scavenger Hunt (Nintendo 64)

  • Rugrats in Paris - The Movie (Nintendo 64, Game Boy Color, PC CD Rom, PlayStation)

  • Rugrats: Totally Angelica (PlayStation, Game Boy Color)

  • Rugrats: Totally Angelica Boredom Busters (PC CD Rom)

  • Rugrats: Go Wild (PC CD Rom, Game Boy Advance)

  • Rugrats: All Growed Up - Older and Bolder (PC CD Rom)

  • Rugrats: Castle Capers (Game Boy Advance)

  • Rugrats: Royal Ransom (PlayStation 2, Nintendo GameCube)

  • Rugrats: I Gotta Go Party (Game Boy Advance)

  • Rugrats: Time Travelers (Game Boy Color)

  • Rugrats Activity Challenge (PC CD Rom)

  • Rugrats Adventure Game (PC CD Rom)

  • Rugrats Food Fight (Mobile Phone)

  • Rugrats Munchin Land (PC CD Rom)

  • The Rugrats Movie (Game Boy Color)

  • The Rugrats Mystery Adventures (PC CD Rom)

  • Rocket Power: Team Rocket Rescue (PlayStation) (Tommy & Angelica appear as guest characters)

  • Nickelodeon Party Blast (Gamecube), Xbox (Tommy and Angelica are playable)

  • Nicktoons Racing (PlayStation, Game Boy Advance, Game Boy Color, Microsoft Windows, Arcade) (Tommy and Angelica playable)

  • Nicktoons Basketball (PC CD Rom) (Tommy appears in All Grown Up! appearance)

  • Nicktoons: Attack of the Toybots (Wii, Nintendo DS, PlayStation 2, Game Boy Advance) (Tommy and Angelica are seen, but are not playable characters.)

− −

Live performances[]

− − Rugrats—A Live Adventure was a show about Angelica's constant attempts to scare Chuckie. To help Chuckie combat his wide range of fears, Tommy invents a magic wand called the "People-ator" to make Chuckie brave. Angelica, however, wants Chuckie to stay scared, so she steals Tommy's wand. The Rugrats try to get it back, but to no avail. Angelica becomes Princess of the World. Eventually, Chuckie becomes brave thanks to the help of Susie, Mr. Flashlight and the audience.[39] Many songs were included in the play, including the theme song. The music was met with a rather mixed reception, which applause was tepid at best. However, the dancing was much better received. In addition, as soon as a character approached the stage to engage the crowd, the response from the kids was wild. Chuckie's pleas help from the audience to stop Angelica's megalomaniacal march toward world domination elicited much excitement and response. Overall, despite the criticism, the show was well received.[40] The show had two 40-minute acts, with a 20-minute intermission (or a commercial break).


	+	

Mach Five and Mach Six[]

Merchandise[]

	+	

The second episode features the rebuilt Mach 5 designed as it appeared in the original anime, only animated in CGI, like all of the other cars in the show's racing sequences. Minor changes have occurred in the Mach Five in this series. Although the function for the homing robot is present, it is redesigned to resemble more of a metal peacock than a sleek, futuristic robot dove. The Deflector is used as the roof of the Mach Five. Also revealed in this show is an ejector's seat underneath the driver's seat in case of emergencies. A parachute was made, but was forgotten to be installed at the time. − Merchandise that was based on Rugrats varied from video games toothpaste, Kellogg’s cereal to slippers, puzzles, pajamas, jewelry, wrapping paper, Fruit Snacks, Inflatable balls, watches, pens, pencils, markers, cookie jars, key rings, action figures, and bubblegum.

− The show also managed to spawn a popular merchandise line at Wal-Mart, K-Mart, Target, EBay, Hot Topic, JCPenney, Toys "R" Us, Mattel, Barnes & Noble and Basic Fun, just to name a few.[41]


	+	

Its return is brief, as Zile Zazic destroys it successfully - the original makes a cameo in Plot for Teacher. However, plans for a new car are discovered and soon the protagonists rebuild the Mach Five to form the Mach 6. The Mach 6's engine is not designed to run on gas, which is a crucial story point, even though gas is still used for it through most of the series. It has all the features of the Mach Five, but redesigned or changed in some form or another. For example, the rotary saws are kept, but they're turned into laser saws. Also, the car has become more of a silver color with a fan in front and also includes two functional jets in the back where the fans were, and are used to get out of situations like a tornado ( as seen in the episode 'The Dance') or to help with acceleration. The new car features a transparent, holographic screen (better known as the 'comp') over the dashboard that the driver can use to interact live with his crew, and with other racers. Apparently, Speed mentions it can dispense rubber spiders out the back, and also real spiders, but he has not confirmed this. In recent episodes in Season 2, a new Mach 6 feature has been revealed after the completion of the gasless engine. When the Mach 6 gets up to the speed of 250 mph, an electrical charge causes the car to jump to another location in a matter of seconds. However, this feature can only be used three times before the car can be restarted. It has also been hinted that the Mach 6 has the ability to time travel with the right part for the gasless engine. − The Rugrats had their own cereal made by Post called Reptar Crunch Cereal. The Rugrats and Reptar were predominantly featured on the front, there's a board game on the back, and a special $3 rebate for Runaway Reptar on the side. This cereal was released for a limited time only, sold at US supermarkets 8/1/99 to 9/15/99 only, and not all supermarkets carried the cereal. To memorialize the movie, Rugrats in Paris, another Rugrats-based cereal came out in October 2000. Simply called the Rugrats in Paris Cereal, it has a similar appearance to Trix; it's a sweetened, multi-grain cereal with small-round bits in plain, red, purple and green. Small Eiffel Towers could also be seen.[42]

Rugrats made fast-food appearances as well with the most appearances being on

− Burger King. Their first fast food appearance was in 1994, when the Hardee's fast food chain offered a collection of Nicktoons toys as premiums that were included with kids' meals at Hardee's. All 4 Nicktoons at that time were featured—Ren & Stimpy, Rocko’s Modern Life, Doug and Rugrats. Other food items that feature Rugrats were Fruit Snacks, Macaroni and Cheese, Bubble Gum and Campbell's Rugrats Pasta with Chicken and Broth.[43]


	+	

The Mach 6 succeeds the Mach 5 for the rest of the series, and more of the original gadgets were gradually revealed (such as the sludge slick) and used in future episodes. − In their first tie-in with Burger King, 5 Rugrats toys were offered with their Kids Club meals, a different one with each meal. Each toy came with a 12-page (including covers) miniature version of Nickelodeon Magazine, which featured the toy's instructions, word search, picture puzzle, "Say What?”,a scrambled word puzzle, a coupon for Oral-B Rugrats toothpaste & toothbrush, and entry blanks to subscribe to Rugrats Comic Adventures, Nick Magazine and the Kids Club. From 1998 till 2003, "Rugrats" based-products included watches and various toys.[44]


See also[]

+

Episodes & DVDs[]

	+	
Main article: List of Speed Racer: The Next Generation episodes

Template:Portal box

  • Klasky Csupo

  • Rocket Power

  • SpongeBob SquarePants

  • The Fairly OddParents

  • Aaahh!!! Real Monsters

  • Hey Arnold!


References[]

+

References[]

  1. Template:Cite news
  2. http://www.thecoast.ca/halifax/empty-frames/Content?oid=1018259
  3. Template:Cite news
  4. Template:Cite news
  5. Template:Cite news
  6. http://www.toonzone.net/forums/showthread.php?t=278865
  7. ALSO CONFIRMED BY TEASER TRAILER RELEASED BY NICK and TNG FACEBOOK PAGE.
  8. Template:Cite news
  9. Template:Cite news
  10. TV.com
  11. Template:Cite news
  12. Template:Cite news
  13. Template:Cite news
  14. Template:Cite news
  15. Template:Cite news
  16. Template:Cite web
  17. Template:Cite web
  18. Template:Cite news
  19. [1]
  20. Template:Cite web
  21. "Spielberg Toons in." TV Guide. October 28, 1995. 33.
  22. Template:Cite web
  23. Template:Cite news
  24. Template:Cite news
  25. Template:Cite news
  26. Template:Cite news
  27. 27.0 27.1 Template:Cite news
  28. Template:Cite news
  29. Template:Cite news
  30. Template:Cite news
  31. 31.0 31.1 Danny Goldberg, Dispatches from the Culture Wars: How the Left Lost Teen Spirit (New York: Miramax Books, 2003), 197.
  32. Template:Cite news
  33. Template:Cite news
  34. Template:Cite news
  35. Template:Cite news
  36. Template:Cite news
  37. Template:Cite news
  38. Template:Cite news
  39. Template:Cite news
  40. Template:Cite news
  41. Template:Cite news
  42. Template:Cite news
  43. Template:Cite news
  44. Template:Cite news

+

External links[]

+

External links[]

	+	

Template:Wikiquote

  • Template:IMDb title

+

  • Template:Imdb title

  • Template:Tv.com

+

  • Template:Tv.com
	+	

	+	

  • Template:Bcdb
	+	

Template:Rugrats

Template:Daytime Emmy Award for Outstanding Children's Animated Program

Template:SNICK/TEENick


Template:Nicktoons

Template:Nicktoons

	+	

Template:Speed RacerTemplate:Creators Syndicate Comics

Template:Nick Jr.


− + − + − + − + − + − + −


	+	

es:Meteoro: la nueva generaciónar:راجراتس

	+	

pt:Speed Racer: Nova Geraçãoda:Rollinger (tv-serie)

	+	

ru:Спиди-гонщик: Новое поколениеde:Rugrats

es:Rugrats

fa:راگرتز

fr:Les Razmoket

it:Rugrats

he:ראגרטס

la:Rugrats

hu:Fecsegő tipegők

ms:Rugrats

nl:Ratjetoe (tekenfilmserie)

ja:ラグラッツ

pl:Pełzaki (serial animowany)

pt:Rugrats

ru:Ох, уж эти детки!

simple:Rugrats

fi:Ipanat

sv:Rugrats

tl:Rugrats

tr:Rugrats

uk:Невгамовні

Revision as of 00:47, 11 August 2011 Speed Racer: The Next Generation Created by Larry Schwarz (based on the original series created by Tatsuo Yoshida) Written by Ben Gruber Allan Neuwirth Marv Wolfman Susan Kim Justin Gray Jimmy Palmiotti Aaron Bergeron Daniel Schofield Mike Yank Walt Gardner James Harvey Directed by Stephen Moverley John Holt Voices of Kurt Csolak Sahra Mellesse Carter Jackson Peter Fernandez (Season 1) Michael Sinterniklaas Robbie Sublett (Season 1) David Zen Mansley Greg Abbey (Season 2-present) Bryan Tyler (Season 2-present) Opening theme "Go Speed Racer Go!", rearranged by John Angier Ending theme "Go Speed Racer Go!" (w/o vocals) Composer John Angier Country of origin United States No. of seasons 2 No. of episodes 35 (aired) (list of episodes) Production Executive producers Larry Schwarz James Rocknowski John Rocknowski Producers Larry Schwarz Ken Katsumoto James Rocknowski John Rocknowski Sergei Aniskov Sean Lahey Christopher Fauci Michael Gold Doug MacLennon Running time 30 minutes (approx.) Production companies Animation Collective (Season 1) Telegael (Season 2-present) Toonz Entertainment (Season 2-present) Distributor Lionsgate Television Release Original network Nicktoons Original release April 27, 2008 – present Chronology Preceded by Speed Racer Speed Racer X Related shows Three Delivery Kappa Mikey External links Website Speed Racer: The Next Generation is an American animated television series based on the classic Japanese Speed Racer franchise, in which the internal events take place decades after those in the 1967 Japanese series. It is the fourth television adaptation of the franchise, and is executive produced by Lions Gate Entertainment, Larry Schwarz, and Ken Katsumoto. It is the first Nicktoon not to be based on an original property.[1] Animation Collective produced the series, while the Flash character animation was handled by the now-defunct Collideascope Studios as their very last project.[2] The last episode of Season 1 features the voice of NASCAR racer Jeff Gordon, who plays Turbo McCalister.

This series was partly made to promote the live-action film, and the pilot movie premiered on Nicktoons Network on May 2, 2008, a week before the feature film adaptation was released in theatres.[3] However, both projects were produced independently from one another and featured different generations of "Speed Racers" (with the film featuring the original generation), though both featured a Mach 6.

A second season began airing on March 24, 2011. [4] [5] The animation, layout, and 3D effects were outsourced to Toonz Entertainment in India for this season. After his death, Peter Fernandez's roles were replaced by Greg Abbey.


Contents 1 Premise 2 Characters 3 Mach Five and Mach Six 4 Episodes & DVDs 5 References 6 External links Premise Prior to the events of the series, the original Speed Racer has disappeared for unknown reasons, but the main characters know that he is alive. Only one of the original characters, Spritle, has a major role in this show. Speed Racer is seen briefly at the end of The Note and more recently in Plot for Teacher, and he makes a full appearance in the pilot episode to Season 2. The rest of the original cast are unseen, and their whereabouts are currently unknown.

The series follows the adventures of an orphan teenager named Speed who dreams of being a famed car racer like the one he is named after. He takes a bus to the elite Racing Academy, founded by the Racer family, and soon experiences the difficulties of fitting in and competing with X, the best racer/student in the school, and Speed Racer's son. Spritle himself is now the headmaster.

In the pilot movie, Speed discovers that he is the other son of Speed Racer, meaning that X is his brother. Through the rest of the series, Speed and his new allies set out on a quest to get through the courses, discover the mystery of Speed Racer's disappearance, and try and build the Mach 6, a car that captures the spirit and gadgets of the Mach 5 for new generations, and the first car to contain a gasless engine.

The most pivotal plot device is the virtual track, a race track that transports racers to virtual racing environments known as the Virtual World. School faculty have the ability to add as many of their own obstacles as they wish, complying to school safety regulations. Whenever a racer is defeated in the track, they automatically get dispensed back onto the real one, unharmed. However, like all programs, the virtual track can be infected with viruses and/or hacked, causing anyone trapped in the Virtual World to be affected.

Characters Main article: List of Speed Racer: The Next Generation Characters Mach Five and Mach Six The second episode features the rebuilt Mach 5 designed as it appeared in the original anime, only animated in CGI, like all of the other cars in the show's racing sequences. Minor changes have occurred in the Mach Five in this series. Although the function for the homing robot is present, it is redesigned to resemble more of a metal peacock than a sleek, futuristic robot dove. The Deflector is used as the roof of the Mach Five. Also revealed in this show is an ejector's seat underneath the driver's seat in case of emergencies. A parachute was made, but was forgotten to be installed at the time.

Its return is brief, as Zile Zazic destroys it successfully - the original makes a cameo in Plot for Teacher. However, plans for a new car are discovered and soon the protagonists rebuild the Mach Five to form the Mach 6. The Mach 6's engine is not designed to run on gas, which is a crucial story point, even though gas is still used for it through most of the series. It has all the features of the Mach Five, but redesigned or changed in some form or another. For example, the rotary saws are kept, but they're turned into laser saws. Also, the car has become more of a silver color with a fan in front and also includes two functional jets in the back where the fans were, and are used to get out of situations like a tornado ( as seen in the episode 'The Dance') or to help with acceleration. The new car features a transparent, holographic screen (better known as the 'comp') over the dashboard that the driver can use to interact live with his crew, and with other racers. Apparently, Speed mentions it can dispense rubber spiders out the back, and also real spiders, but he has not confirmed this. In recent episodes in Season 2, a new Mach 6 feature has been revealed after the completion of the gasless engine. When the Mach 6 gets up to the speed of 250 mph, an electrical charge causes the car to jump to another location in a matter of seconds. However, this feature can only be used three times before the car can be restarted. It has also been hinted that the Mach 6 has the ability to time travel with the right part for the gasless engine.

The Mach 6 succeeds the Mach 5 for the rest of the series, and more of the original gadgets were gradually revealed (such as the sludge slick) and used in future episodes.

Episodes & DVDs Main article: List of Speed Racer: The Next Generation episodes References

"Return Laps for the First Voice of Speed Racer". New York Times. 2008-05-10. Retrieved 2008-08-12.
http://www.thecoast.ca/halifax/empty-frames/Content?oid=1018259
"Nicktoons Network To Premiere New Speed Racer Series In May". Animation News Network. Retrieved 2010-04-21.
http://www.toonzone.net/forums/showthread.php?t=278865
ALSO CONFIRMED BY TEASER TRAILER RELEASED BY NICK and TNG FACEBOOK PAGE.

External links Official Speed Racer site Speed Racer: The Next Generation on IMDb Please use a more specific TV.com template. See the documentation for available templates. Speed Racer Deals Cross Finish Line NYCC 08: Speed Racer's Next Generation Revealed TV Guide's Speed Racer: The Next Generation episodes Template:Nicktoons

vte Speed Racer by Tatsuo Yoshida Franchise MangaAnimeThe New AdventuresXThe Next Generation episodescharactersFilm soundtrackRace to the Future Video games The Challenge of Racer XMy Most Dangerous AdventuresSpeed Racer (1995)Speed Racer (1996)Speed Racer (2008) Miscellaneous Mach FiveRacer XLego Speed Racer Categories: Speed RacerAmerican animated television seriesAnime-influenced animation2008 American television series debutsTelevision series by Lionsgate TelevisionNicktoons (TV channel) original series Navigation menu Not logged in Talk Contributions Create account Log in ArticleTalk ReadView sourceView historySearch Search Wikipedia Main page Contents Current events Random article About Wikipedia Contact us Donate Contribute Help Learn to edit Community portal Recent changes Upload file Tools What links here Related changes Special pages Permanent link Page information Cite this page Wikidata item Print/export Download as PDF Printable version

Languages Español עברית Magyar Português Русский ไทย Edit links This page was last edited on 11 August 2011, at 00:47 (UTC). This version of the page has been revised. Besides normal editing, the reason for revision may have been that this version contains factual inaccuracies, vandalism, or material not compatible with the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License. Privacy policyAbout WikipediaDisclaimersContact WikipediaMobile viewDevelopersStatisticsCookie statementEnable previews Wikimedia FoundationPowered by MediaWiki

Advertisement